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Theatre

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F5

Introduction to elements of theatrical performance, including design, acting, history, and literature.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F5

Introduction to elements of conventional acting for the stage. Involves script analysis with a concentration on relationships between characters, their goals and obstacles. Practice involves improvisation and scripted scenes.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F5

An exploration of the creative process and the principles and tools of design as they apply to theatrical production. Emphasis will be on script analysis, graphic techniques, and trends in theatrical design through research, practical exercises, and projects.

Credits:
1-4

Actual stage experience in one of the subscription series productions ranging from minor to major roles. Investigation into character, period and author will be included. 46 hours of work will be required for each academic credit.

Credits:
1-4

A course designed to prepare students to audition for TTA, SETC, URTA and other established auditions.

Credits:
4

A course designed to prepare students to audition for TTA, SETC, URTA and other established auditions.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F5

How can simple actions like cleaning a staircase, cooking and serving food, or sitting across from a stranger be considered art? In this class we'll explore the ways in which carefully considered interactions with other people, objects, and spaces can become extraordinary experiences. We'll focus on everyday activities and examine how actions like recontextualizing, scripting, and repeating these activities can shift our understanding and impact an audience. We'll read about and recreate significant performances from the 1960's - today, and work individually and collaboratively to produce original works of performance art. No prior performance experience is necessary.

Credits:
4

This course provides an introduction to technical theatre, with emphasis on standard scenic elements and lighting mechanics. A significant practical laboratory gives students hands-on experience with set construction and lighting.

Credits:
4

This course is designed for a study of variety in acting styles and disciplines.

Credits:
4

A study of the history, theory and practice of the art of creating performance environments, including visual, experiential and spatial compositions, this course will also distinguish the individual elements that comprise the “design” of a performance event (including but not limited to sets, lights, sound and costumes). The course will explore global influences on scenography, as well as practical collaborative applications of this holistic approach to the construction and reception of meaning in contemporary performance (such as theatre, dance, performance art and film).

Credits:
1-4

Stage experience in a major role.

Credits:
4

Special Topics in Theatre.

Credits:
4

A study of theories of performance. Not merely a historical survey of ideas, this course investigates how theatre works, and looks carefully at the boundaries of theatrical performance. The course considers space and time, concepts of identity, dramatic literature, the theatre metaphors that pervade philosophy and the social sciences, and radical experiments with theatrical performance.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F4

Study of selected plays, performance genres and styles, and theatre’s roles in political and philosophical movements during the past century.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F4

Application of experience and training in acting, design, technology, and theory in the development of original performance pieces. Involves a study of deliberate efforts in history to change how theatre is done and to adapt theatre to unexpected purposes.

Credits:
4

Practical engagement with the art of developing and directing theatrical productions.

Credits:
1-4

Work on a production under the supervision of the director in the area of historical and critical analysis of the play.

Credits:
4

The actor’s instrument is the self. The goal of this class is to exercise the whole person, as training for performance and in the service of realizing creative imagination.

Credits:
4

This course explores the creative process and the principles and tools of design as they apply to costume design. Emphasis will be on script analysis, period research and rendering techniques, utilizing classroom discussion, design evaluation, practical exercises and projects.

Credits:
1-4

Designed for students to do advanced work in directing plays in production.

Credits:
4

The process of scene design, from inception of an idea to completion of a documentation package, will be the focus of this course.

Credits:
1-4

Working experience in the design and execution of stage settings.

Credits:
1-4

Working experience in the design and execution of costumes for productions of the McCoy Theatre or the Theatre Department. Students act as designers or assistant designers.

Credits:
1-4

Working experience in the design and execution of audio-visual elements for productions.

Credits:
1-4

Working experience in the design and execution of lighting designs.

Credits:
1-4

Working experience in the various areas of production, including but not limited to stage management, properties management, and set/costume/lighting crews.

Credits:
1-4

Working experience in the areas of public relations, advertising sales, newsletter publication, house management training, etc.

Credits:
4

An exploration of lighting design and documentation through small class projects designed to help develop each student’s ability to make appropriate design choices.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F9

This course is an introduction to forms of theatrical performance in India, particularly those which exist as religious or devotional practices. The material of the course includes Vedic and epic literature, classical Sanskrit drama, and a variety of contemporary forms such as kathakali and raslila. The course is designed for students in various disciplines, and assumes no significant prior knowledge either of South Asian culture or of performance theory.

Credits:
4

Focused and intensive study of various aspects of theatre arts not covered in existing courses. Topics vary with instructor. The course is repeatable for credit with different topics.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F5

This course is team-taught with a faculty member from the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures, most often Spanish. The course objective is to develop an understanding and appreciation of a panorama of intellectual and cultural activities through the reading and staging of a variety of dramatic works. Students analyze dramatic texts as literature; at the same time they develop a series of theatrical scenes for performance in class and one or two public performances of a full play or an extended portion thereof. See Spanish 320.

Credits:
1

Junior Theatre majors contemplating honors are required to enroll in a preparatory tutorial. Enrollment in this course does not guarantee acceptance into the Honors Program.

Credits:
1-4

Actual working experience in areas of interest may be gained through this course. Work may be on or off campus. Applications for internships must be filed and approved prior to registering for this course.

Credits:
4

Collaborative and/or individual research or creative projects to be realized as the culmination of a student’s study of Theatre and Performance.

Credits:
4

Open to candidates for Honors in Theatre. 

Credits:
4

Open to candidates for Honors in Theatre. 

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F5

This is the travel-study portion of Track One: Ancient Greece and Rome: The Foundations of Western Civilization of the European Studies Program. This includes a month-long tour of the Continent including Crete, Athens, Delphi, Didyma, Istanbul, Troy, Naples, Pompeii, Herculaneum, Rome and the Vatican City, ending in the final week in London. During the tour, each student keeps a daily academic journal. Most students will never have thought seriously about art, architecture and city structure before going on this program but, by the end of it, each student should have the wherewithal to look at a building or a sculpture and understand its period, its aims, the way it was produced and what the artist intended by it.