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Psychology

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F2, F8

This course is designed for the non-psychology major and will examine a different general-interest topic each time it is taught. Students will be exposed to the five major theoretical perspectives and to research methods as they pertain to a thematic topic such as ‘close relationships,’ ‘psychology of the self,’ ‘drugs, brain, and behavior,’ etc.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F8

This course will cover major content domains in the discipline of Psychology, including biological, cognitive, developmental, social and personality, and mental health. In addition, themes that are relevant to all of these domains and that link content areas will be discussed, with emphasis on ethics and cultural/social diversity. This course is also intended to foster an appreciation of the role of scientific reasoning in understanding human behavior and the mind. Students will be introduced to the major theoretical perspectives and to the basic principles of psychological research methods.

Credits:
4

Students will be taught critical thinking and scientific reasoning skills. Topics include: philosophy of science and the scientific method, measurement theory (reliability and validity), the basics of research design (control variables, rival hypotheses, and confoundings), and elementary statistical analysis. 

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F6

Statistical methods are an integral part of social sciences, particularly psychology, as they provide the tools that are needed to reveal patterns in complex behavior. Students will develop an appreciation of the role of statistics and knowledge of the major tests that demonstrate differences and relationships. Math 111 cannot be substituted for this course.

Credits:
4

A survey of theories and research concerning sensation and perception focusing on how we construct an internal representation of the external world from the evidence of our senses.

Credits:
4

Traditional Western conceptualization of health divides our experiences into physical and mental - body and mind, and also into wellness and illness. Yet many other cultures understand health very differently. Increasingly, Western models of health care aim to approach health from a more integrated and culturally competent model. This is in response to recognition that current leading causes of mortality (such as substance abuse, overeating, unprotected sex, and suicide) are driven by psycho-social factors. It is also increasingly seen as necessary in order to develop health interventions that serve culturally diverse populations. This course will give students access to critical knowledge in the burgeoning field of health psychology, which aims to address these issues. Course material will cover basic theory, research, and intervention methods in the field, integrating content from biology, psychology, sociology, and anthropology. Based on this knowledge, students will create proposals for health psychology interventions in their area of interest, empowering them with the skills necessary to be leaders of progress in the areas of health and wellness. Health psychology is a broad and upcoming field important for those interested in public health, medicine, and psychology.

Credits:
2

Theories and research on human learning and teaching, especially in educational settings. This course will cover the current theories of teaching and learning processes from a variety of perspectives, with emphasis placed on applications of research to practice and policy. Cognitive processes, individual differences, strategies for instruction, motivation, critical thinking, and self-regulation of learning will be stressed.  

Prerequisites:
,
Credits:
4

The phenomenology, etiology, and treatment of the major forms of psychological disorders, including schizophrenia, mood disorders, anxiety disorders, and personality disorders. We will evaluate theories and research concerning these disorders from psychobiological, behavioral, cognitive, sociocultural, and psychodynamic perspectives. 

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F11

A study of developmental principles, focusing on research relevant to prenatal development, infancy, and childhood. Theories of emotional, cognitive, and personality development will be examined. Students will consider the implications of developmental research for social and educational policy that affects the welfare of children. F11 sections include a 10-hour community-based learning requirement.

Prerequisites:
,
Credits:
4

Theories and research on adolescent and early adult development will be applied to educational and social policy issues pertaining to identity work and the accomplishment of other developmental tasks typically undertaken during the teens and twenties.

Prerequisites:
,
Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F11

This course will explore how cognition, emotion, social relations, and mental health change with healthy aging, and to a lesser extent, pathological aging. Major theories and research findings in these areas will be discussed and applied to the everyday functioning of this growing segment of our population.

 

Credits:
4

Students will consider research and theory on the ways that gender is established and enacted in language structures and in discourse practices. We will critically examine research on gender differences in language use and we will play with linguistic forms and speaking styles that seem to be gendered in some cultural communities. Students will collect data on their own and their classmates’ speech habits and will endeavor to develop discourse skills that allow them to be intentional about appropriating and resisting gender norms, as the situation demands.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F11

This course provides an introduction to community psychology, focusing on historical foundations, theory, methods, and practice. In this course, students will learn about the basic theories and concepts that define community psychology while becoming familiar with examples of effective community action and research. Students will have the opportunity to examine the potential relevance of community psychology for addressing social problems.

Prerequisites:
,
Credits:
4

All of us have been raised swimming in a sea of information regarding what sex, gender, and sexuality are and what it means to be of a certain sex, gender, and sexual orientation. But how much is fact and how much is fiction? Are people with penises always boys? Are women more nurturing? Is being gay genetic? This course aims to peel the curtains away and look at what the psychological science really says about sex, gender, and sexuality. This course will be challenging in that it will require students to examine their own experiences with their sex, gender, and sexuality as well as question their own assumptions about sex, gender, and sexuality. Having gained knowledge in an area often ripe with misperceptions, students will also be tasked with developing a proposal to increase knowledge regarding the psychology of sex, gender, and sexuality in a target audience of their choice. 

Prerequisites:
,
Credits:
4

A discussion of recent theory and research on human language. Topics to be covered include language development, the relationship between language and thought, and the relationship between language and culture.

Non-psychology majors with a special interest in language or theatre are welcomed in this course.

Credits:
4

Study of social behavior, including such topics as interpersonal attraction, altruism, aggression, conformity, group dynamics, leadership, intergroup conflict and negotiation, attitude change, person perception, and the social aspects of environmental and health psychology.

Credits:
4

This course is a survey of the empirical development, implementation, and dissemination of current practices of psychotherapy. In particular, the course will utilize scientific knowledge to answer the question, “For whom does this psychological intervention work, and under what conditions?” The importance of multicultural contributions and competencies will also be emphasized throughout the course. Case conceptualization skills will be learned and practiced, using DSM-5 diagnoses to inform selection and implementation of an indicated evidence-based therapy. 

Prerequisites:
,
Credits:
4

This course will cover theories of learning and motivation. Emphasis will be placed on individual differences and underlying cognitive processes involved in learning, as well as behavioral and social cognitive perspectives of learning, and on the theories and influences on motivation to learn. We will also cover the science of studying learning and motivation, and application of the material, including to students’ own learning and motivation within and outside of the classroom.

Prerequisites:
,
Credits:
4

This course is an in-depth exploration of human cognitive abilities, including perceptual processes, attention, memory, language, and thinking. In addition to providing an overall understanding of these topics, this course examines the research methodology and theoretical frameworks used to study cognitive processes, how these processes can be applied to everyday life, and current issues in the field of cognitive psychology.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F11

Psychometric principles of test construction and issues of reliability and validity of contemporary psychological tests will be covered. Students will learn accepted practices and critical issues in the administration and interpretation of psychological tests.

Credits:
4

This course examines the link between brain and behavior from the systems level. We will explore the major cognitive systems, including object recognition, attention, memory, language, emotion, social cognition, and executive function, as well as broad-based topics such as brain plasticity and cognitive perspectives on psychopathology.

Credits:
4

Students will conduct a laboratory or field research experiment on human participants. Note: Must be taken by the end of the junior year.

Prerequisites:
,
Credits:
4

Students will gain experience in program evaluation, community psychology, and with the design and collection of survey data. Counts as an applied psychology course. Note: Must be taken by the end of the junior year. Psychology 250 is strongly recommended prior to enrolling in this course.

Prerequisites:
,
Credits:
4

Students will collect and/or analyze qualitative and/or observational research data. Note: Must be taken by the end of the junior year.

Prerequisites:
,
Credits:
1

A survey of contemporary research on selected topics, to be taken in preparation for honors research. Open only to junior psychology majors.

Credits:
2-4

An issue of current interest and importance in psychology will be explored in depth. Topics will be announced each time the course is offered.

Credits:
4-8
Degree Requirements:
F11

Supervised experience in applying psychological knowledge and principles in a real-world setting for junior and senior psychology majors. Students prepare a research paper or a literature review on a topic related to the internship, work on a project with the off-campus supervisor, and keep a journal. Only 4 internship credits may count towards the major. This is a pass/fail course.

Credits:
4

Psychology majors are required to enroll in Senior Seminar during the senior year. Senior seminar is intended to be a capstone experience in Psychology, requiring both oral and written work.

Credits:
4

Maximum of 12 hours credit. For students accepted into the honors program of the department to do independent research.

Credits:
4

Maximum of 12 hours credit. For students accepted into the honors program of the department to do independent research.