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International Studies

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F3, F8

A survey of contemporary international politics. Major topics covered in this course include international political geography, the
evolution of the international system, the nation-state, modern diplomacy, international political economy, international law and
organization, the East-West conflict, and North-South issues.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F8

An introduction to the principal theories, analytical approaches, and methods relating to the study of comparative politics. Concrete
country and case studies are used to highlight the relationship between the tools of comparative politics and real world political events
and processes.

Credits:
1

Simulation of United Nations bodies (General Assembly, Security Council, Economic and Social Council, etc.) in a controlled class
environment where debate and procedure are emphasized. Students engage in topical research on political, economic, and social issues
of assigned countries and formulate position papers and resolutions for debate in the simulation. The course meets one evening per week
for eight weeks. It may be repeated for credit up to a maximum of four (4) credits.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F3

Survey of significant events and trends in the international system since 1945. Topics include the origins, evolution, and end of the cold
war. The emergence of the post-cold war era, decolonization and East-West competition, the rise of nationalism, the role of nuclear
weapons in world politics, changes in the global economy, and challenges facing the United States today are also examined.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F8

An introduction to the ecological politics paradigm, an alternative approach to the study of international relations. This course explores
how environmental issues, population, disease, technology, and globalization create both problems and solutions to traditional questions
of international relations (like war and peace, sovereignty, development, and power) and raise new areas of inquiry. This course may be
sequenced with INTS 341: Comparative Ecopolitics for the purposes of the IS minor.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F2i

An exploration of the shifting meanings and interpretation of “security,” particularly the securitization of population. The course covers a
wide range of population topics, including aging, migration, the youth “bulge,” urbanization, health, and the demographic “bonus.”
Population trends, their security implications, and their connections to issues such as development and the environment are examined.
This course may be sequenced with INTS 340: The Politics of Migration for the puposes of the IS minor.

Credits:
1

A review of important global issues confronting U.S. foreign policy decision makers. The course meets in the evening for two hours,
once a week for eight weeks. The teaching of this course is shared as each member of the departmental faculty will typically deliver one
lecture. The course is open to Meeman Center Students.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F8, F9

Survey of historical and political trajectories of selected Middle East states, including Turkey, Iran, Israel-Palestine, and the Eastern
(Mashreq) Arab world. The region’s history, influence of Islam, and ideological trends are considered as are the roles of ethnic and
religious minorities, state building, economic and political liberalization, authoritarian rule, conflict, and gender questions.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F8

Survey of topical areas of significance to Middle East politics. Possible topics include the treatment of minority peoples, social
movements, and political ideologies in the region as well as the Arab-Israeli conflict and the Kurdish dispute.

Credits:
4

Survey of the foreign policies of selected Middle Eastern states. Particular attention is paid to theoretical interpretations of state behavior,
individual decision makers, unintended policy results, and the need to balance domestic and external policy imperatives. The central
pedagogic concern revolves around understanding how and why various Middle Eastern states choose the policies they do.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F9

An introduction to the complexity of the African political and socio-economic mosaic. The course examines the political, economic, and
social transitions on the continent since the 1960s with particular focus on issues of governance and socio-economic development in
selected countries. The role of both external and internal factors in shaping these political and social dynamics provides the theoretical
focus for an investigation of present political economy and future possibilities.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F9

This course examines the origins and development of Pan-Africanism and its impact as a political movement for the empowerment of
Africans in the Diaspora and the decolonization of the African continent. The role of the OAU/AU as the basis of collective African security, diplomacy, regional economic integration, and development is evaluated with a view to determining its achievements, problems, and prospects. Particular emphasis is placed on the role of agency in hatching, animating, and orchestrating social movements.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F8

A theoretical delineation of how ethnic groups are socially constructed and maintained through a deliberate process of cultural
objectification. The historical, political, religious and socio-economic roots of identity conflict in Africa are examined. Conflicts such as
the Sudanese civil war; the Rwandan genocide; the Biafran civil war; conflict in the Great Lakes region; post-election violence In Kenya
as well as ethnic strife in other areas are covered.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F9, Africana Studies Elective, Film Studies Elective

This course will use documentary film to help understand the remarkable political transformation of South Africa in the 20th century.
When the first Europeans settled in South Africa in 1652 they laid the basis for a racial oligarchy which only ended in 1994 with the
election of Nelson Mandela as President of a "New" South Africa. Heretofore South Africa had been ruled by whites for the benefit of
whites with a system of racial domination called apartheid (from 1948) and which kept the white minority in power with a combination
of economic dependency, political exploitation, psychological manipulation and violent repression. The inherent inhumanity of apartheid
created an international outcry and spawned a global human rights movement which, along with internal political action by the black
majority, helped move South Africa toward a non-racial government. Essential to that movement were images of life inside the apartheid
system which were seen via a set of documentary films. The earlier documentary films we will see both not only showed the truth of
what happened on the ground but also became artifacts of the struggle itself. It is for this reason that we will use documentaries to tell the
story of South Africa's transition from apartheid to freedom. The latter films show how much needs to be done before the promise of
equality in South Africa is realized.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F2i

 

Critically analyze the ethics and rationale for using film as political propaganda to exert control,manipulate policy, and conduct war in totalitarian and democratic Germany and the UnitedStates during the 20th century. Historical and contemporary films are drawn from several nationsincluding the United States, Germany, United Kingdom, Qatar, and Russia. 

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F11

A six week study program in China. Emphasis is placed on the language, culture, history, politics, and economy of China. Students
should contact the I.S. Department and/or the International Programs Office for additional details.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F9

A study of the political system of the People’s Republic of China, including an examination of the three centers of power (party,
government, and military), ideology, leadership, political change, provincial and local governments. The Chinese political system is
assessed as a unique communist system and one that is changing due to rapid economic development. Current political problems are also
analyzed.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F9

An analysis of China’s foreign policy from 1949 to the present. Particular emphasis is placed on China’s relations with the United States,
Russia, Japan and Europe, its bid to lead the Third World bloc, Beijing’s efforts to adjust to a new world order and its new role as an
economic power.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F8

A comparative study of the interactions between politics and the economy in Japan, South Korea, and Taiwan. Major topics covered
include developmental states, state-society interactions, state-business relations, labor politics, economic and political development, and
welfare politics.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F8

An exploration of the political and economic dimensions of China-Taiwan relations as well as the role played by the U.S. in these
relations. Major topics covered include Sino-U.S. relations, Chinese nationalism, identity politics in Taiwan, Taiwan Strait Crises, the
U.S. approach to China-Taiwan relations, China’s Taiwan policy, Taiwan’s China policy, and economic ties between China and Taiwan.

Credits:
4

Concentrated study on issues of special importance in international affairs. Recently offered topics include Modern Islamic
Fundamentalism, International Development, Ethnic Conflict, Terrorism, and International Drug-Trafficking.

Credits:
4

Concentrated study on issues of special importance in international affairs. Recently offered topics include Modern Islamic
Fundamentalism, International Development, Ethnic Conflict, Terrorism, and International Drug-Trafficking.

Credits:
4

This course examines various tools and methods used in the study of international relations. The formulation and design of research
projects is emphasized. Basic analytical concepts and techniques are introduced as students explore various approaches to the study of
world politics.

Prerequisites:
,
Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F8, F9

An introduction to Latin American politics. Military rule, human rights, democratization, populism, and the politics of gender, class, and
ethnicity are examined in relation to specific countries in the region. The course then explores the political dimensions of development,
poverty, and inequality. Emphasis is placed on the most important conceptual and theoretical frameworks used to understand politics and
governance in Latin America.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F8

A survey of Inter-American affairs, with a focus on past and present relations between Latin American countries and the United States.
The course examines the consequences of U.S.-Latin American relations for democracy, human rights, and economic prosperity in the
Western Hemisphere. Relevant themes include democracy promotion, immigration, and trade. The course combines case studies of
specific countries, policy analysis, and historical/theoretical perspectives on Inter-American relations.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F8

A comparative study of the government and politics of Europe. Emphasis is given to the evolution of parliamentary democracy,
governmental, political, and social institutions, disparate decision-making patterns, and different political cultures. A special segment is
devoted to the evolution of the European Union and the current level of European integration.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F8

An examination of the evolving European integration process, institutions, and policymaking procedures, and the interaction between
national and "European" interests and political outcomes. The development of Europe as a "community of values" and the fostering of a
"European" identity are examined in the context of the European Union's growth as a political community and its relations with nonmember
states.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F11

This travel/study course is a combination of lectures, case discussions, and site visits in Antwerp, Belgium. Students should contact the
Economics and Business Department and/or the International Programs Office for additional details. The course is the same as Business
283.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F8, F9

A study of countries comprising the former USSR. The course discusses the politics of reform, as well as the domestic, foreign, and
security policies of the successor states, and the context of the changed global power equation after the Cold War.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F9

This course examines mainstream and independent media sources, literary works, and films in order to find the authentic Putin and
dynamic contemporary Russia. Unraveling over a century of attempts by the West to penetrate and remake Russia, we will apply
theoretical frameworks appropriate to the specific forms of communication and expression (journalism, literature, and film) in order to
better understand the real, instead of parodied or demonized, president and the country he has steered since the beginning of the
millennium. The course is the same as Russian 285.

Credits:
2

The course is intended to help students to engage with the host culture while abroad; in so doing, students will hopefully learn more
about themselves as well. It will also allow students to keep in touch with their peers and others engaged in study/internship abroad.
Students will communicate with each other and their Rhodes mentor using Moodle.

Credits:
2

This course is designed to prepare students for their study abroad experience and to help them derive maximum benefit from their time abroad. Studying or interning in a different country can be exciting and life-changing. It can also be confusing and frustrating, especially if you are not prepared for the different cultural context and are uncertain about the prevailing social norms or work habits of the host country. This first course will prepare the student for his or her first exposure to living, studying, and working in a foreign country.

Credits:
2

The objective of this course is to facilitate re-entry after a study abroad experience, identify intercultural competency and cultural
learning gained through the study-abroad experience, and extend and apply that learning in new situations both at present and looking
toward the future.

Credits:
4

An examination of the major theoretical paradigms in the study of international politics and/or comparative politics. An overview of
approaches to the study of international relations with emphasis on the realist, liberal, critical, and Marxist debates. Paradigms of
international development studies are also analyzed.

Prerequisites:
,
Credits:
4

Contemporary nation-states display a wide range of diversity in their patterns of power and authority and choices of economic systems.
This course seeks to comprehend from a theoretical perspective the processes which produced these present systems, their similarities
and differences, and their sources and mechanisms of change. Major theoretical perspectives are reviewed.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F8

An overview of major issues and theoretical paradigms in international political economy, including interdependence, foreign economic
policymaking, the evolution of the international financial system, the role of multinational corporations, and issues in the North-South
dialogue. Emphasis is on the variety of ways in which political and economic forces interact to affect flows of goods, services,
investments, money and technology.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F2i, F8

This course examines contemporary political developments that have affected women around the world, including the “War on Terror,” armed conflicts, sex trafficking and tourism, migration, and democratization. In addition to investigating the gendered effects of policies, we analyze women as political actors in their own right. Their participation in both violent and non-violent struggles will be discussed. Revolutionaries, protesters, environmentalists, motherist movements, presidents, and members of parliament: these are but a few examples of the diverse expressions of women’s politics. 

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F8, F11

This community-integrative course introduces students to the politics of social movements and activism both within the United States
and abroad. The main focus will be urban-based movements seeking to represent communities who have been politically marginalized
on the basis of class, race, ethnicity, gender and/or sexuality. Students will investigate the strategies participants in such movements use
to identify pressing social problems, to mobilize support for their cause, and to influence policy making. Comparative analysis of
local/national forms of activism and movements that have emerged overseas is central to the course. All students will engage in
community-based learning by working with local organizations involved in advocacy.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F8, F9

Religious politics is on the rise: sectarian conflict is destabilizing the Middle East, Hindu and Jewish ethno-religious parties are
challenging liberal democracies through democratic systems, the Christian Right in the US has become a crucial player in local and
national politics, Christian Democrats in Europe are leading governments, the Catholic Church is reorienting itself with a new global
mission, Evangelical Protestantism is spreading widely and quickly in Latin America and Africa, religious liberties are still a human
rights issue in China, and radical transnational religious movements, such as Al Qaeda and ISIS, are challenging the international system based on nation-states. In this class, we will address this rise of religious politics through: (1) the lenses of comparative politics theories and discuss issues such as the role of religion in democratization, civil wars, national identity, and post-conflict reconciliation, and (2) the lenses of international relations theories and discuss issues such as the global rise of radical religious movements, the role of religion in
foreign policy making and regional conflicts.

Credits:
4

This course will examine many of the complex and controversial issues regarding the emergence of the contemporary international
human rights regime. Among these issues are: What is the purpose of human rights? What should their content be? When do violations
of human rights warrant intervention across national boundaries? Is there a single moral foundation for human rights that spans many
cultures or are there many culturally specific moral foundations, or none? In what sense, if any, are human rights universal? We begin
with a brief look at the philosophy of rights, discussing how to define rights in general and human rights in particular. Using Mary Ann
Glendon’s study of Eleanor Roosevelt and the drafting of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights as a point of departure, we also
review existing international treaties on human rights. Our class discussions will focus on rights about which there is a great deal of
international consensus (such as the right not to be tortured) and rights over which there is much disagreement (such as the right to health
care). We will also discuss whether rights are accorded to individuals or groups and how rights are guaranteed. We conclude with a
consideration of what makes for a successful human rights campaign (e.g. South Africa) and what challenges are faced by “new”
campaigns such as women’s rights, LGBTQ rights, and the rights of the child?

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F8, F11

This course explores how international migration challenges notions of identity, citizenship, and economic livelihood and how migrants
engage in transnational social practices through travel, communication, and financial transfers. It examines whether the international
regime to deal with migration is adequate to meet today’s challenges, including refugees and trafficked persons, and how the cultural
challenges of integration differ across countries, particularly in liberal states. This course may be sequenced with INTS 221: Population
and National Security for the purposes of the IS minor.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F8

This course examines the question why different countries and communities end up with different approaches to the same environmental
and population problems. Using a comparative lens, we look for the answer in different roles of social movements and advocacy; regime
type; political culture and institutions; the policymaking process; and economic development. This course may be sequenced with INTS
220: Global Ecopolitics for the purposes of the IS minor.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F8

This course examines the foreign policy making process in the U.S. and American foreign policy since World War II. Emphasis is placed
on the historical evolution of American foreign policy, the conduct and style of foreign policy making and the contemporary foreign
policy establishment. Policy alternatives for specific issues in the present and near future are also studied.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F8

This course examines the evolution of American military power and U.S. national security policy in the twentieth century. Emphasis is
placed on the dynamics of policy formation, the interaction of foreign and defense policy, and the impact of domestic politics and the
changing international environment on the policy process. Various strategic theories, assumptions about national security policy, and
dilemmas regarding the use of force are also examined.

Credits:
4

An examination of the impact of terrorism on U.S. national security in the post-9/11 environment. The impact of 9/11 on U.S. security
policy is considered, including the threats posed by terrorism to the homeland and to U.S. interests abroad, U.S. responses to terrorism,
and long-term implication of the Global War on Terrorism strategy for U.S. global power position.

Credits:
4

An examination of how Security Studies have evolved over the years, covering both traditional and non-traditional areas of security. It
examines a range of concepts from “hard security” to such ideas as energy security, economic security, cyber security and human
security. The problem of preventive war, deterrence, mass suicide terrorism, nuclear proliferation unconventional war, and globalization
are also considered.

Credits:
4

An examination of U.S. foreign policy toward the countries of East Asia with a focus on America’s traditional role in the Far East, wars
in Korea and Vietnam, problems in current relations with China and Japan, the NICs and ASEAN. Also to be assessed are the survival of
communism in East Asia, trade and security issues, and human rights.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F3

This course examines the concept and theories of revolution; the development of processes involved in revolutionary political
movements, and the consequences and ramifications of revolutionary political change. Historical case studies are employed to analyze
the specific revolutionary role of such contributive factors as human agency, mass mobilization, state breakdown, international dynamics,
and the prevailing social and cultural environment.

Credits:
4

An examination of the global expansion of democracy in recent decades. The course analyzes the processes of democratic transition,
consolidation, and deepening. Relevant themes include civil society, political institutions, culture, and economic development. A variety
of countries in Africa, Asia, Latin America, the Middle East, and the former Soviet Bloc are explored. Particular attention is given to
theories of democratization within the field of comparative politics.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F8

A survey of theoretical explanations of international and regional conflicts and an analysis of the practicalities of conflict management
and resolution through negotiation, mediation, adjudication, and various other forms of third party intervention. Emphasis is placed on
historical origins of conflict; its ethnic, religious, geographic, and political dimensions; and the complexities of conflict management and
resolution on the part of international actors.

Credits:
4

An examination of the history, structure and evolution of the United Nations and analysis of procedures of international cooperation in key issue areas, including the peaceful settlement of disputes and collective security, human rights, population, the environment, and economic well-being.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F8

A study of the sources and development of international law with particular focus on examination of the core domains of the law
including international human rights law; diplomatic law; the law of treaties; international criminal law; international environmental
law; as well as the law of the sea, among others. The course seeks to address questions such as; what are the sources of international
law? Who makes international law and how is it legislated? What are the rights and duties of subjects of international law? Who
enforces international law and how? Towards this end, specific legal cases are delineated and discussed with a view to demonstrating the
practical application of international law and the difficulties associated with enforcing international law.

Credits:
1-8
Degree Requirements:
F11

On an individual basis and in conjunction with the Career Services Office, students can receive internship credit for work in various
professional settings. Internships have been arranged in the past with a variety of local law firms, non-profit agencies, government
agencies, and area corporations. The typical internship experience receives four academic credits on a pass/fail basis. Student interns are
expected to keep a regular log of their activities and write a final paper reflecting on their experience.

Credits:
2
Degree Requirements:
F11

The Mertie W. Buckman International Internship Program provides an opportunity for outstanding International Studies majors and
International Studies-related Interdisciplinary majors to spend two months abroad while working on an internship project approved by
the International Studies faculty. The internships, which seek to give students a practical exposure to international politics and
economics, are awarded on a competitive basis.

Credits:
4

Conducted as a tutorial in seminar format, this course assists students in intensive research and the completion of the Senior Paper and an
oral presentation of the Senior Paper based on topics chosen by students and approved by the faculty member in charge of the seminar.
Social science research methods and theories used in the study of international relations and comparative politics are also discussed.

Credits:
4

An Honors version of International Studies 485, this tutorial will consist of individual research and writing of the Honors Project.
Students should consult with an International Studies faculty or staff member about their intentions to pursue an honors project at the
beginning of the fall semester of the senior year (or earlier) and obtain a copy of the “Honors in International Studies Guidelines.”

Credits:
4

An Honors version of International Studies 485, this tutorial will consist of individual research and writing of the Honors Project.
Students should consult with an International Studies faculty or staff member about their intentions to pursue an honors project at the
beginning of the fall semester of the senior year (or earlier) and obtain a copy of the “Honors in International Studies Guidelines.”