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Business

Credits:
4

This course introduces student of diverse majors to an alternative future where they may achieve financial independence and security for
themselves; while also contributing to the economic well-being of the community. Students will explore start-up and small business
issues and develop some of the skills needed to: evaluate the potential for success of ideas; determine resources needed and methods to
acquire them; communicate those ideas in a convincing manner; implement ideas into a working enterprise; understand and deal with
pitfalls; and manage and grow the resulting enterprise. Rhodes College is an incubator of ideas where students have been instilled with a
passion for their major fields while building a level of expertise in them. This course will enable students to look at their diverse
expertise and passions through the different perspective of turning ideas into enterprises. Class discussions will be exploratory in nature;
introducing a number of business skills needed by entrepreneurs. Students will make several presentations of their venture ideas, write
and present feasibility studies/business plans, and discuss small business and start-up firm cases. There may also be some participation in
the course by the entrepreneurial community. This course is open to students of all majors.

Credits:
4

Principles of financial accounting that are used to communicate financial information to external parties. The study of financial
accounting provides a strong foundation for future courses in business and finance. The student is introduced to accounting concepts,
how to record transactions for the three legal forms of business organizations, and how to prepare financial statements.

Credits:
4

Analysis of cost accounting techniques and applications relative to managerial planning, control, and decision-making. Topics include
measurement of unit costs, control of operating costs, incremental decision-making, production cost reports, cost variances, and profit
planning. Computer spreadsheets and cases are used to analyze cost accounting data and to simulate managerial accounting decisions.

Credits:
4

Introduction to legal concepts in those areas of the law essential to commercial transactions, including creation and performance of
contracts for the sale of goods and other property, negotiable instruments, real and personal property, leases, and wills and estates. The
course will be taught largely utilizing the case method and problem approach, with an emphasis on how legal concepts are applied to
specific factual situations. (Not scheduled for 2016-2017)

Credits:
1-4

Content of the course varies with instructor. The course may be repeated for credit as long as topics covered are different.

Credits:
4

This course focuses on the development of a working knowledge of basic tools that guide the student in the acquisition of sound personal
financial discipline at the individual level. The course approaches this objective assuming that the student has little or no background in
the issues or tools relating to the management of one’s financial resources, with a focus on the development and appropriate
implementation of a personal budget; the management of individual credit exposure and issues surrounding the borrowing and
repayment of money; an analysis of investment alternatives and vehicles, and risks typically associated therewith; the impact of personal
income taxes on decision making where multiple financial alternatives exist. Particular nuances of stock, bond, mutual fund, and ETF
investment alternatives are explored, as well as the structural aspects of tax-deferred savings opportunities (including 401(K) and IRA
vehicles.) The protection of wealth through the use of insurance and other risk management techniques is also emphasized. (Not
scheduled for 2016-2017)

Not open to first-year students or to Business or Economics/Business majors.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F9, F11

This course raises awareness about the influence of regional and local culture on business activities. Students will analyze key elements
of the Catalan culture through readings from traditional Catalan literature and scholarly articles that focus on identifying cultural
dimensions and their effect on business. The students will use these readings to analyze everyday experiences during their three-week
program in Barcelona. Through the students’ reflections on their exposure to the Catalan culture, they will compare and contrast the local
culture with their own and explore the impact of those differences on living, working, competing in athletic events and conducting
business abroad.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F11

Course is a combination of lectures, case discussion, and site visits. Lectures by Rhodes and University of Antwerp faculty as well as
European Union officials on international business including strategy, finance, marketing and management within the context of the
European Union will form the basis for class discussion of business cases. Following work on business cases, students will visit business
sites for discussion of the businesses’ strategies and performances with firm officials. The course is offered in Antwerp, Belgium. Cases
and site visits will vary from year to year. Business 283 is not open to students who have completed any prerequisites for Business 483.
By application and acceptance to the program only. (Same as International Studies 283.)

Credits:
1

Open only to Business majors and sophomore students fully intending to declare a major in Business. The course focuses on assignments
that will assist in focusing on career direction and choice. Course requirements include producing a resume and mandatory attendance at
specified guest speaker lectures. The resume and lecture attendance may be used as the required essay for major declaration.

Sophomore, junior, or senior status. Students who have completed BUS 460 may not
enroll.

Credits:
4

Accounting theory, from both the theoretical and practical viewpoints. Covers the foundation of accounting theory, the accounting and
reporting process, and the impact of the recent pronouncements from FASB, AICPA, AAA, and SEC.

Prerequisites:
, ,
Credits:
4

Accounting theory, from both the theoretical and practical viewpoints. Covers the foundation of accounting theory, the accounting and
reporting process, and the impact of the recent pronouncements from FASB, AICPA, AAA, and SEC.

Credits:
4

An introduction to the principles of taxation applicable to individuals and businesses, including determination of income, deductions,
exemptions, capital gains and losses, depreciation, employee expenses, alternative minimum tax, and property transactions. The course
emphasizes taxation of individuals, but introduces corporate and partnership taxation as well. Coverage includes the theory and purpose
of taxation, the impact of taxes on management decisions, and the evolution of the tax system over time. A computer tax service and a
computer tax preparation program are utilized for tax research and simulation of financial decisions involving complex tax issues.

Prerequisites:
,
Credits:
4

The main objectives of the financial manager are to plan for, acquire, and use funds in an efficient manner in order to maximize the value
of the firm. This course introduces the discounted cash flow model, modern portfolio theory, the capital asset pricing model, and the
static theory of capital structure. Major topics covered include decision-making under uncertainty, cost of capital and valuation, history
of capital markets, and financial analysis. Students are introduced to computerized financial spreadsheets, case studies, and contemporary
financial issues.

Prerequisites: Cost Accounting, Introduction to Economics, and Statistical Analysis for Economics and Business or Introduction to Applied Statistics

Prerequisites:
, , ,
Credits:
4

Focuses on evidence-based management to separate useful from useless management practices. Initially, the course Introduces scientific
principles as an analytic framework for evaluating management theories about people at work, especially theories about work
motivation, leadership and job design. Later, the course focus shifts to the topic of organizational design and the management of firms in
an ever-changing business and competitive environment. This subject identifies structures and processes for managing within the everchanging
environments organizations face. Students acquire experiences in applying scientific analyses to real-world situations by
analyzing cases and through research projects.

 

Prerequisites: Introduction to Economics; Cost Accounting; and Statistical Analysis for Economics and Business or Introduction to Applied Statistics or Statistical Methods

Prerequisites:
, , ,
Credits:
4

An introduction to the study of marketing as a value adding exchange process. The theoretical underpinnings of how businesses add value to consumers and collaborators is examined. Topics covered include the marketing process, buyers and markets, identifying market opportunities and satisfying them through managing pricing, products, services, communications and channels.

Prerequisites:
, ,
Credits:
4

Conceptual approach to auditing process, procedures, communications and professional environment which includes auditing standards,
legal responsibilities and professional ethics.

Credits:
4

Application of financial theories introduced in Financial Management (Business 351) to actual business problems using quantitative and
qualitative techniques. Presented with debatable alternatives, students analyze, choose, and defend their ideas and a course of action.
Financial theories are reexamined in conjunction with their related cases. Case topics include financing current operations, long-term
financing, investment decisions, signaling with dividend and debt policies, and mergers and acquisitions. Contemporary corporate
financial issues are examined, as well as financial ethics. Extensive creation of computerized financial spreadsheets. Students are
organized into teams for case preparation.

Credits:
4

Introduction to the environment of international financial management and aspects of capital markets, including the international
monetary system, balance of payments, parity conditions in the foreign exchange market and selected investment topics. Presentation of
foreign exchange markets,domestic and international investment analysis, domestic and international capital markets and derivatives,
using concepts learned in Business 351: the efficient market hypothesis, discounted cash flow analysis, modern portfolio theory and
static capital structure theory. Students are also exposed to financial engineering and option theory in order to understand foreign
exchange forward and futures contracts and foreign exchange options, which are important hedging securities. Case studies included.
Use of computerized spreadsheet required.

Credits:
4

Open only to Business majors, the internship program provides an experiential approach to the learning process and affords students the
opportunity to work in both business and nonprofit organizations for academic credit. Internship placements are designed to complement
learning goals and career plans by allowing the student to apply theoretical principles learned in the traditional classroom. Placements
are arranged by the Director of Career Services and work schedules are arranged by the student and the on-site supervisor. Typically
students work on specific projects related to their career interests and compatible with the goals and interests of the sponsoring
organization. A major focus of the course is teaching students better interview skills and how to improve their written and verbal
communication techniques all within a context of the student becoming more professional as he/she approaches obtaining a job, and how
better to conduct themselves on the job. Internships are available to junior and senior Business majors. Arrangements for internships are
made the semester prior to the actual experience. No more than 8 internship credits may be allowed to count toward the credits required
for graduation.

Prerequisites:
, , ,
Credits:
1

This internship course provides an experiential approach to the learning process and affords Business majors the opportunity to work in
both business and nonprofit organizations for academic credit. Students are encouraged to explore areas of possible career interest
through internships. Students must have the approval of and coordinate with a designated Professor in the Department of Business on an
internship that exposes the student to meaningful aspects of a career in business. The Career Services Office will also coordinate the
internship choice. There are requirements for both the sponsoring organization and for the student. The student must submit a resume, an
application, have an interview arranged an interview with the on-site supervisor, and prepare an essay summarizing the experience, all as
directed by the supervising Professor. This internship program is limited to Business majors and is available only for non-paid
internships. Course may be repeated for credit, but no more than eight credits may be counted toward graduation.

Credits:
4

Explores the application of management models to international business decisions in the areas of work design, organizational structure,
strategic planning and human resource/personnel management. The focus is on the usefulness of contemporary models across diverse
cultural settings as indicated by recent empirical research.

Credits:
4

The course will start with a brief recap of the development of the current theories of entrepreneurship, and a discussion of the value of
those theories using some actual examples in the form of scenarios and case studies. The participants will practice techniques related to
the critical analysis of novel business opportunities in terms of market conditions, product/service value, existing and potential
competition, design of operations, and the availability of critical resources. There will be several formal and informal presentations
which will be given in the context of an entrepreneur making a pitch to potential investors. Development of detailed business plans will
be a major deliverable in the course, including entry strategies, human resource/management considerations, legal and financial issues,
pricing, promotion, and implementation plans. Cash flow and forecasting the first 3-5 years and discussion of some challenges to be
anticipated in those early years will also be expected. Before the course starts, students will be required to present and gain instructor
approval of a proposal for a business opportunity personally to explore during the semester. (Not scheduled for 2016-2017)

Prerequisites:
, ,
Credits:
4

Content of course varies with instructor. The course may be repeated as long as topics covered are different.

Credits:
4

An introduction to the functions of personnel/human resource management. Topics covered include human resource planning, training
and development, wage and salary administration, selection instrument validation, employee performance evaluation, and employee
relations. Special attention is given to the use of information systems for managing personnel functions. A computer/library project that
focuses on the relationship between work attitudes and work behavior
is required.

 

Prerequisites: Management of Organizations and Statistical Methods for Economics and Business or Introduction to Applied Statistics, or Statistical Methods

Prerequisites:
, , ,
Credits:
4

An exploration of how organizations can create a more inclusive corporate climate, which will allow them to learn from and enhance the
potential of employees from all backgrounds. Discussions and assignments will examine research on and practical solutions for
management of global and diverse workforces. The course will begin with research on the development of personal stereotypes as well
as systemic discrimination in society, and will progress into specific human resources policies and decisions affecting employees at
various stages of their careers. The course will end with an examination of organizational cultures and the development of inclusive
workplaces.

Credits:
4

This course focuses on decision making through use of principles, frameworks and theories from strategy and marketing, along with quantitative and qualitative techniques. Topics covered in the cases include competitive and growth strategies, customer acquisition, retention, and management; product, innovation and brand management; offline and online channel management; and technology management strategies. The course emphasizes metrics and measurement for real-world decision making, primarily in dynamic industries. Some sections will utilize a computer simulation.

Credits:
4

An introduction to the global marketing environment, with an examination of how international business variables affect the marketing
process. Objectives include understanding the differences between domestic and international marketing, providing a framework for
analyzing major risks and opportunities in foreign markets, and developing techniques for preparing and implementing strategic
marketing plans through the use of case studies.

Credits:
4

Services Marketing is the management of customer experiences. Hospitals, executive training firms, movie theaters, universities, law
firms, non-profit agencies, insurance agencies, restaurants, ad agencies, hotels, recruiting firms, etc. (i.e., both consumer and business-tobusiness
firms) are examples of service businesses. However, all businesses have some component of service to them. The main
objective of the course is to understand the nature of services and discuss ways in which services can streamline operations and improve
productivity and profitability through examination of the customer service experience and establishing the relationship between customer
value and sustainable competitive advantage. There will be case assignments and presentations to enhance in-class learning experience.
A major team project will be conducted to help a local business to analyze the customer service experience and provide a series of
strategic marketing suggestions for the management.

Prerequisites:
, ,
Credits:
4

An exploration of the ethical and social issues facing business leaders today. Students will gain a basic understanding of philosophical
ethical theories and begin to apply them to a variety of business cases and ethical dilemmas, using critical thinking skills and reputable
research to examine issues from multiple perspectives. Students will learn how to recognize ethical dilemmas, examine the consequences
of various decisions, and be able to develop and defend arguments for the business decisions that they make.

Prerequisites:
, ,
Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F9, F11

This course raises awareness about the influence of regional and local culture on business activities. Students will analyze key elements
of the Catalan culture through readings from traditional Catalan literature and scholarly articles that focus on identifying cultural
dimensions and their effect on business. The students will use these readings to analyze everyday experiences during their three-week
program in Barcelona. Through the students’ reflections on their exposure to the Catalan culture, they will compare and contrast the local
culture with their own and explore the impact of those differences on living, working, competing in athletic events and conducting
business abroad. Students will apply the knowledge gained from their exploration of Catalan culture to the functional area(s) of business
they have completed in their 300-level business course(s).

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F11

The course is a combination of lectures, case analyses, and site visits. Lectures by Rhodes and University of Antwerp faculty as well as
European Union officials on international business including strategy, finance, marketing and management within the context of the
European Union will form the basis for written case analyses and oral presentations. Following case completion, students will visit
business sites for discussion of the businesses’ strategies and performances with firm officials. Students enrolled in this course will be
required to complete detailed and sophisticated case analyses drawing upon prerequisitecourse work as well as course lectures. The
course is offered in Antwerp, Belgium. Cases and site visits will vary from year to year. BUS 483 may be used as one of the two required
electives for a business or economics/business major. Open only by application and acceptance to the program.

Prerequisites:
, ,
Credits:
4

A study of the theory and practice of setting and administering business policy, this course integrates the student’s previous study of
economics and business. Emphasis is on appraising a company’s performance and strategy considering general social and economic
conditions, as well as the internal conditions of the firm; developing objectives, policies and plans; and developing, guiding, and
maintaining an administrative organization to carry out the plans and meet the objectives. Pedagogy includes computerized case studies
in business and team teaching. Students are organized into teams for case preparation and presentation, and will be required to present
their analyses orally and in writing and to respond to analyses of other students.

 

Prerequisites: Senior Status; Corporate Financial Management, Management of Organizations, Marketing Management I, Completion of at least two of the upper level business electives from two different areas as required for a major in Business, or permission of the Department Chair.

Credits:
4

Same as Business 452 with additional requirements for graduate credit.

Credits:
4

Same as Business 454 with additional requirements for graduate credit.

Credits:
4

Same as Business 463 with additional requirements for graduate credit.

Credits:
1-4

Content of the course varies with instructor. The course may be repeated for credit as long as topics covered are different. The course
will include international accounting, accounting for not-for-profit organizations, including governmental entities.

Credits:
4

Same as Business 466 with additional requirements for graduate credit.

Prerequisites:
, ,
Credits:
4

Same as Business 472 with additional requirements for graduate credit. Prerequisites: Economics 290 and Business 243 and 371 or the
permission of the instructor and program director.

Credits:
4

Same as Business 473 with additional requirements for graduate credit.

Credits:
4

Same as Business 483 with additional requirements for graduate credit.

Credits:
4

An in-depth analysis of the measurement and reporting of financial information to investors and managers. Conventional accounting
methods, asset valuation, and income determination, as well as other current topics, will be explored. The course will utilize current
articles to study contemporary research issues in financial accounting.

Prerequisites:  Completion of Core courses.

Credits:
4

An advanced study of conceptual and practical aspects of accounting as a control system. Topics will include measurement of
organizational performance, resource allocation, activity-based costing, break-even analysis, process costing, cost variances, transfer
pricing, and choosing among alternative projects. Students will analyze case studies, work problems similar to real-world situations, read
journal articles on current cost issues, and prepare written reports and presentations.

Prerequisites: Completion of Core courses

Credits:
4

An overview of the accounting principles, procedures, and reporting for governmental and not-for-profit entities. Topics covered include
accounting for state and local governments, operating statement accounts, budgetary accounting, general capital assets, long-term
liabilities and debt service, college and university accounting, and health care accounting. The course will stress comparisons between
governmental accounting and corporate accounting to strengthen the students’ understanding of the conceptual bases of each.

Prerequisites; Completion of Core courses.

Credits:
4

An intensive examination of the federal income tax laws as they relate to partnerships, trusts, and corporations. Discussions will focus on
economic and policy issues surrounding the current tax structure. Also, emphasis will be placed on tax research to enable students to
analyze complex tax problems.

Prerequisites: Completion of Core courses.

Credits:
4

This course will address various topics in advanced accounting. Accounting for investments including fair value, equity and
consolidation of financial statements will be covered in depth. Bankruptcy and partnership accounting issues will be reviewed. Foreign
currency transactions and translation will be examined. Emerging issues related to the accounting profession will be discussed as an
integral part of the course.

Prerequisites: Completion of Core courses.

Credits:
4

The impact of federal regulations on businesses, particularly in the areas of antitrust law and securities regulations. This course will
examine the legal responsibilities of business owners and directors, as well as the responsibilities of business entities.

Prerequisites: Completion of Core courses.

Credits:
4

A comprehensive view of the development, implementation, and auditing of accounting information systems. The course will cover the
theoretical and technical aspects of the attest function, with an emphasis on the establishment and analysis of controls in computer-based
systems. Topics will include data integrity and quality, materiality, sampling, reports, ethics, and regulations.

Prerequisites: Completion of Core courses.

Credits:
1-4

Content of the course varies with instructor. The course may be repeated for credit as long as topics covered are different. The course
will include international accounting, accounting for not-for-profit organizations, including governmental entities.

Credits:
4

This is a survey course of the relationship between business and society. The course explores a wide variety of analytical models that
might be used to evaluate business decisions from an ethical perspective. The course uses lectures, discussion and case methods to
analyze the relationship between business and the public with which it interacts.