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Biology

Credits:
4

Topics in Biology courses provide an in-depth understanding of a topic in the Biological Sciences. As in other introductory biology courses, each Topics course details fundamental principles and concepts in the discipline but in the context of a specific topic. Topics in Biology may be taken as elective credit by students majoring in Biology provided they have not already taken an upper level Biology course of similar content; however, Topics in Biology will not satisfy a course requirement for the major in Biology.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F7

Similar to BIOL 104 but includes a laboratory component.

Credits:
4

Consortium course at Christian Brothers University. An introduction to human anatomy and physiology designed for and required by some nursing, physical therapy, and physician assistant programs. Often accepted to fulfill Anatomy and/or Physiology requirements at pharmacy programs. This course is not designed or recommended for those seeking acceptance at medical, dental, or veterinary medical schools. This course is taught by and at our cross-town partner, Christian Brothers University. Availability is learned at the start of their semester. Registration requires specific steps. Instructions are available from Dr. Alan Jaslow. Biology 115, 115L will not satisfy a course requirement for the major in Biology

Prerequisites:
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Credits:
4

Consortium course at Christian Brothers University. A continuation following Human Anatomy and Physiology I. Same specifics as Biology 115, 115L, listed above.

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F7

This course focuses on a scientific understanding of the environment as well as on people’s impact upon the natural world. Emphasis is on critical evaluation of environmental issues based on scientific principles. The fundamental ecological principles are the foundations for the students’ learning and understanding of, among others, human population dynamics, natural resources, energy sources and their use, and sustainable human systems. Through field-based laboratories, the students learn how to evaluate and quantify the ecosystem services provided by an urban park like Overton Park. During the semester students collect and analyze data to estimate selected ecosystem services such as: climate regulation or carbon dioxide removal, and water purification. Biology 120 will not satisfy a course requirement for the major in Biology.

Credits:
3
Degree Requirements:
F7

An examination of the structure and functions of life at the cellular level. Topics include the organization of prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells, the role of proteins in cell structure and metabolism, membrane structure and function, bioenergetics, interactions between a cell and its environment, and the mechanisms of heredity. Biology 130 and 131L are linked co-requisites. Both must be completed successfully for F7 credit.

Credits:
1
Degree Requirements:
F7

An introduction to investigative techniques in biology and skills required for the analysis and presentation of scientific findings, with emphasis on topics at the cellular level.  Biology 130 and 131L are linked co-requisites. Both must be completed successfully for F7 credit.

Credits:
4

A study of biological principles at the level of organisms and above. This course covers the mechanisms of evolution; plant and animal development, anatomy, and physiology; behavior and ecology. Biology 140 and 141L are linked co-requisites.

Prerequisites:
,
Credits:
1
Degree Requirements:
F7

Continued development of investigative techniques in biology and the skills required for the analysis and presentation of scientific findings, with emphasis on topics at the level of organisms and above.  Biology 140 and 141L are linked co-requisites.

Prerequisites:
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Credits:
4, 1

Evolution is the grand unifying idea of biology. This study of the evolutionary process will include discussion of the genetic mechanisms of variation, natural selection, change in populations, speciation, coevolution, hominid evolution and biogeography, as well as applications of evolutionary biology to real-world problems. The history of evolutionary ideas from before Darwin to the present will also be covered. Laboratories will involve original research design, data analysis, discussion of a many types of literature and presentation of ideas in a variety of formats.

Prerequisites:
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Credits:
4, 1

The study of life’s “fifth kingdom”: the fungi. Even though they share an equal evolutionary standing with plants and animals, to most people fungi are amongst the most mysterious and least understood of nature’s inhabitants. Just what is a fungus anyway? Where do fungi live, and what are they doing out there? This course will provide answers to questions like these, as well as provide examples of the practical uses of fungi in industry and research and of the roles that some of them play as agents of disease. Laboratory work includes methods for isolating and identifying fungi from nature, methods of genetic analysis, and methods for producing commercial products like tempeh and beer.  (Course normally offered in alternate years; anticipated for 2017-2018.)

Prerequisites:
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Credits:
4

A study of the diversity of vertebrates including past and present radiations. This course focuses on the various and diverse adaptations in behavior, ecology, morphology and physiology that allow vertebrates to successfully inhabit water, air and land. (Course normally offered every two to three years.)

Prerequisites:
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Credits:
4, 1

Development is the process by which a multi-cellular organism constructs itself from a single egg cell. This course examines the cellular and genetic mechanisms required for pattern formation, differentiation, morphogenesis and other events that shape the organism during development. These phenomena will be explored in the context of evolution and medical applications. Modern experimental approaches and current models will be emphasized.

Prerequisites:
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Credits:
4, 1
Degree Requirements:
F11

An evolutionary and ecological approach to questions of why and how animals behave as they do. Emphasis is on how traits help individuals maximize the survival of genes within them. Laboratories will involve quantitative data collection in both the laboratory and field.

Biology 200 recommended. Math 111 or equivalent suggested.

Prerequisites:
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Credits:
4

A study of the morphological changes that occur in animals from fertilization of an egg to birth. This anatomically-based course will focus on the development of the major organ systems and body plan of vertebrates, including comparisons of developmental patterns among vertebrates and understanding what happens when the patterns are disrupted to produce birth defects. Class meetings will be predominantly lecture with some laboratory work. (Course normally offered every two to three years.)

Prerequisites:
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Credits:
4

An interdisciplinary examination of the environmental issues of a region of the world famous for its captivating scenery, immense richness and dire scarcity of natural resources, and cultural diversity of its people. Special attention will be devoted to the role of parks and community-based conservation projects in achieving a balance between people’s needs and wildlife conservation. By itself, this course satisfies an upper-level requirement for the Biology major; when combined with Biology 214, the two courses together satisfy a requirement for one upper-level course with laboratory. (Course offered pending student demand; anticipated in 2018-2019.)

Credits:
4
Degree Requirements:
F11

An in-country exploration of the major environmental issues of Namibia, one of the world's most arid and most beautiful countries. Students will spend three weeks in the region, visiting different ecosystems, such as the Namib Desert, dry thornveld savannas, and the Kalahari sands. They will meet with indigenous people, NGOs, and governmental officers involved in local environmental issues. Elephant and cheetah tracking can be part of the educational experience during this field study trip. This course emphasizes critical thinking and interdisciplinary learning and is meant to challenge students' world-view to enable them to increase their awareness and knowledge of our global society. (Course offered pending student demand; anticipated in 2018-2019.)

Credits:
4, 1
Degree Requirements:
F11

This course will showcase the dynamic inner workings and rich evolutionary history of the plant kingdom. Topics to be covered include the genetics underlying morphological form and function, plant responses and adaptations to the environment, the biomechanics of plant anatomy and physiology, evolutionary history, taxonomic diversity, and interactions between people & plants. Examples of laboratory activities include characterizing the genetics behind environmental responses, looking at hormonal pathways with transgenic plants, and learning to identify the rich diversity of plants in our Memphis area. Students will interface with different organizations in Memphis, improving our understanding of local plant diversity and helping others to better understand the importance of plants. (Course normally offered in alternate years; anticipated for 2018-2019.)

Prerequisites:
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Credits:
4

This course is offered at the Semester in Environmental Science (SES) Program at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts. Students accepted into the SES Program will take this course.

The microbiology techniques commonly used to study microbes affecting human health are often ineffective for the study of microbes in natural ecosystems. Lectures in this course will present the scientific rationale behind a number of methods used by microbial ecologists. In the laboratory, students will work with the latest techniques to measure microbial biomass, activity, extracellular enzymes, biogeochemistry and species diversity.  These methods include epifluorescence microscopy, radioisotopic tracers for bacterial production, fluorescent substrates, hydrogen sulfide and methane production, and molecular probes for classes of bacteria. Students may use these techniques in concurrent independent research projects.  This course is an elective offered to students who enroll in the Semester in Environmental Science (SES) Program at the Marine Biological Laboratory in Woods Hole, Massachusetts.

Students who participate in the SES Program may count ENVS 260 and ENVS 270 as two upper-level courses with labs towards the Biology major (subject to the limit that no more than two courses outside of the Rhodes Biology program may be applied to the major), but BIOL 280 will count only as elective credits in Biology (this course may not count as one of the six upper-level Biology courses required for the major).

Prerequisites:
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Credits:
4, 1

The study of microorganisms from the perspectives of molecular biology, metabolism, physiology, genetics, evolution and ecology. Principal emphasis will be placed on prokaryotic microorganisms (the bacteria and archaea) and the importance of their metabolic strategies and physiology in defining the roles that they play in nature including, though not limited to, the ability of pathogenic microorganisms to survive in a host and cause disease. The laboratory emphasizes the development of skills in isolation and characterization of bacteria.

Prerequisites:
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Credits:
4

The study of the transmission of genetic factors in humans and eukaryotic model systems. Principal emphasis will be placed on the analysis of heredity, genes as functional units, and phenotypes resulting from regulated gene expression. Students who already have credit for Biology 304/304L may not earn credit for Biology 303. (Course normally offered every two to three years.)

Prerequisites:
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Credits:
4, 1

The study of the transmission of genetic factors in humans and eukaryotic model systems. Principal emphasis will be placed on the analysis of heredity, genes as functional units, and phenotypes resulting from regulated gene expression. Laboratory exercises include experimental genetic screens, genomic approaches and their analysis. Students who already have credit for Biology 303 may not earn credit for Biology 304/304L.

Prerequisites:
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Credits:
4

An advanced treatment of the structure and function of eukaryotic cells. Major emphasis will be placed upon the roles played by biological membranes in cell nutrition and energy transduction; on processes of signal transduction; on the roles of the cytoskeleton in cell structure, motility, and reproduction; on mechanisms that regulate the cell cycle and cell death; and on mechanisms that regulate intracellular trafficking. Optional laboratory credit is available by taking BMB 310 (see Biochemistry and Molecular Biology program under Interdisciplinary Study).

Prerequisites:
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Credits:
4, 1

A broad study of concepts in the science of ecology. This course stresses the biotic and abiotic interactions that determine the distribution and abundance of organisms. The laboratory component consists of both on-campus laboratory work and intensive field experiences including at least one overnight outing. Students with organismal and environmental interests desiring a field component are encouraged to participate. Occasional Saturday and weekend field trips are required.

Credits:
4, 1

An interdisciplinary examination of the science of conservation of biological diversity at gene, population, species, and ecosystem levels. Learning the theories and practice of conservation biology and critically evaluating strategies adopted to prevent loss of biodiversity are the main objectives of this course.  Laboratories and field work are designed to make the students familiar with research methods and tools used by conservation biologists.

Credits:
4, 1

A study of the structure and function of genes at the molecular level. Topics include the synthesis of nucleic acids and proteins and the mechanisms of gene expression and control in prokaryotes and eukaryotes. An emphasis will be placed on the design, analysis, and interpretation of classic and contemporary experiments. The laboratory component will teach the student how to conduct and interpret experiments in molecular biology such as isolation of DNA, gel electrophoresis, recombinant DNA cloning, and DNA sequencing within the context of specific projects.

Prerequisites:
,
Credits:
4

A course examining the fundamental facts and concepts of the fields of both Virology and Immunology. The Virology component, approximately one quarter of the course, introduces the key features of viral structure, function, pathogenesis and epidemiology in the context of example viruses that cause significant human disease. The Immunology component of this course examines the components of the vertebrate immune system and how they interact to defend the organism against pathogens, how a dysfunctional immune system can cause disease, and how knowledge of the immune system can be applied in areas such as transplant medicine and the immunotherapy of cancer. 

Prerequisites:
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Credits:
4, 1

A study of the various systems of animal physiology (e.g., muscular, nervous, endocrine, cardiac, digestive, respiratory, renal). These themes will be covered in an integrative manner that includes analysis at molecular, cellular, systems, and organismal levels. An emphasis will be placed on the maintenance of homeostasis. Furthermore, a comparative approach will be taken to emphasize not only how the human body functions, but also how various animals have evolved similar physiological endpoints that can be compared in their structure and functional efficacy to the human body. Such an approach will allow an understanding of how physiology functions, what are its constraints and specializations, what aspects of physiology are integral to sustaining life, etc. Laboratory investigations will include studies of vertebrate muscle physiology and biochemistry and regulation of vertebrate cardiac activity, blood pressure and respiration. Laboratory experiments will involve the careful and humane use of live vertebrates as research models. Laboratories are scheduled for 4 to 5 hours each week.

Prerequisites:
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Credits:
4, 1

A field-based course examining how the study of birds has informed our understanding of the natural world. Topics include the ecology, conservation, behavior, biogeography, and evolution of birds. Labs provide hands-on experience with avian research methods, focusing especially on survey techniques and identification of local species. A strong emphasis is placed on experiencing local avifauna in their natural habitats through field trips, and students will spend considerable time in the field observing the natural history of birds. Occasional Saturday and weekend field trips are required. (Course normally offered every two to three years.)

Credits:
4, 1

A comparative approach to the study of vertebrate anatomy, emphasizing evolution, development, and functional significance. This course focuses on understanding human anatomy through the examination of morphological patterns shared by vertebrates. Laboratories will involve dissection of representative vertebrates, with a focus on mammals. Two lecture sessions and not less than 4 hours of laboratory/practicum per week.

Prerequisites:
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Credits:
4, 1

A study of the anatomy and physiology of animal cells, tissues and organs at the microscopic level. This course emphasizes the relationship between microscopic form and function starting with a brief overview of cells and progressing through the different mammalian organ systems.

Prerequisites:
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Credits:
4, or 4, 1

Introduction to selected advanced biology topics. Topics vary with instructor. May be repeated for credit when topics differ. Course offering may or may not have a laboratory credit associated with the class. Not offered every year. Course may include the equivalent of 3 hours of laboratory each week.

(Biology 120 and Chemistry 120 may serve as prerequisites for some offerings when
used to satisfy Environmental Science major requirements. Consult the professor offering the course.)

Prerequisites:
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Credits:
4

An exploration of reciprocal interactions between the nervous and endocrine systems: how the brain regulates endocrine homeostasis, and how developmental and daily/seasonal changes in hormone levels bring about changes in neural structure and function. These themes will be covered in an integrative manner that includes analysis at molecular, cellular, systems, and organismal levels. Topics will include gonadal hormones and neural sex differences during development and adulthood, the hippocampal-hypothalamic-pituitaryadrenal stress axis, circadian and circannual rhythms, neuroendocrine regulation of appetite and thirst, and neuroendocrine regulation of social behaviors.

Prerequisites:
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Credits:
4

An exploration of the unique cell biology and physiology of neurons.  Students will learn how neurons grow and maintain highly specialized structures such as dendrites and axons, and then use them to send, receive, and process information.  Course topics will include the neuronal cytoskeleton, axonal transport, axonal pathfinding and synaptogenesis, action potential generation and propagation, synaptic transmission, dendritic integration, and synaptic plasticity.

Prerequisites:
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Credits:
4

A topical exploration of the connection between basic biomedical science and its clinical significance. Four topics are covered during the semester. Each topic is taught by a St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital post-doctoral fellow; a Rhodes faculty member directs the course. Each topic consists of a presentation of pertinent background information on basic scientific principles, reading and discussion of secondary and primary literature within the research area of the post-doctoral fellow, and discussion of potential clinical significance of the research.

Prerequisites:
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Credits:
1-4

Qualified students may conduct original laboratory or field research in biology. A student may use four credits of research or a combination of two credits from BMB 310 combined with research credit to total four credits to satisfy one of the upper level requirements in Biology. Students may earn a maximum of four credits of BIOL 451 plus 452. Interested students should consult the appropriate Biology faculty member. At least three hours per week per credit, weekly conferences with faculty sponsor, written report at the end of the semester.

Credits:
1-4

Qualified students may conduct original laboratory or field research in biology. A student may use four credits of research or a combination of two credits from BMB 310 combined with research credit to total four credits to satisfy one of the upper level requirements in Biology. Students may earn a maximum of four credits of BIOL 451 plus 452. Interested students should consult the appropriate Biology faculty member. At least three hours per week per credit, weekly conferences with faculty sponsor, written report at the end of the semester.

Credits:
1-4

Qualified students may continue original laboratory or field research in biology past the four credits gained in BIOL 451 and 452. BIOL 453 credits may not be used to satisfy upper level course requirements. Interested students should consult the appropriate Biology faculty member. At least three hours per week per credit, weekly conferences with faculty sponsor, written report at the end of the semester.

Credits:
3-4
Degree Requirements:
F11

The Internship Program is designed to introduce students to practical applications of their academic work. Students may work off campus under professional supervision in fields related to the biological sciences, such as health care, laboratory diagnosis, forensics, environmental protection, agriculture. Students will be required to integrate academic and work experiences in a written report due at the end of the internship. No more than 4 credits per semester for no more than two semesters; at least three hours involvement per week per credit. Pass/Fail credit only. Biology 460 does not satisfy an upper level Biology course requirement for the major.

Credits:
1-2

Similar to BIOL 460, but does not require a written report and does not fulfill the F11 degree requirement.

Credits:
4

All Biology majors are required to enroll in Senior Seminar during one semester of their senior year. Senior Seminar is intended to be a broad, integrative experience in Biology, requiring both oral and written work.

Credits:
4

All Biology majors are required to enroll in Senior Seminar during one semester of their senior year. Senior Seminar is intended to be a broad, integrative experience in Biology, requiring both oral and written work.

Credits:
4-6

Open to candidates for Honors in Biology. Includes supervised honors research in a biological field of study. General information may be found in the Catalogue under the Honors Program (http://catalog.rhodes.edu/catalog/opportunities-individualized-study). Contact the Department Chair for additional information related specifically to Honors in Biology. 

Credits:
4-6

Open to candidates for Honors in Biology. Includes supervised honors research in a biological field of study. General information may be found in the Catalogue under the Honors Program (http://catalog.rhodes.edu/catalog/opportunities-individualized-study). Contact the Department Chair for additional information related specifically to Honors in Biology.