Programs of Study

A course at Rhodes is an academic activity undertaken by a student that is structured, directed, advised, and evaluated by a faculty member. Typically, a course requires a student to read, listen, discuss, and write while learning and developing specific abilities and sensibilities and while internalizing information and ideas from the specific subject areas outlined in the course syllabus. These activities require many hours of work over a semester and involve regular meetings with the faculty member and other enrolled students. The meetings or class sessions provide opportunities for lecture by faculty, discussion among students, student presentations, and other activities directly related to students’ learning that are naturally done in a collective setting. Class meetings and the final examination period together usually constitute only one-fourth to one-third of the time spent on a course, so the majority of time a student dedicates to a course is outside of the classroom or laboratory. Measured in academic credit, a typical student’s work load each semester is sixteen credits. Such a load corresponds to approximately fifty to fifty-five hours of work per week and is consistent with the understanding that a student’s academic work is considered to be his or her full-time job while enrolled in the College.

One credit is equivalent to one semester hour. A student is expected to spend a minimum of forty-six hours in academic study for every hour of academic credit. This principle applies to directed inquiries, tutorial study, and to all courses in the curriculum.

The College reserves the right to cancel any course for which there is insufficient enrollment.

“Fall” and “Spring” below the course titles indicate the semester in which the course is normally taught. However, course offerings are affected by semester or annual staffing patterns, so the semester class schedule should be consulted for the official course offerings for any one semester. Course credit is shown at the right of the line.

Courses taught in a two-semester sequence are normally scheduled with the Fall Semester course being the first in the sequence. In most cases, the second course in the sequence requires successful completion of the first course, but there are some sequential courses that allow the second course to be taken first. The course descriptions will identify such courses. Credit is given for half of a hyphenated course should the student not enroll the following semester.

Course Numbering

Normally courses numbered in the one-hundreds and two-hundreds are for first and second year students; those in the three-hundreds and four-hundreds are for juniors and seniors. Courses numbered above 500 are graduate-level courses and are open only to students admitted to the graduate program. Courses numbered above 800 are courses designed for and offered only to students attending any of the various Rhodes foreign study programs.

In general, courses numbered in the one-hundreds and two-hundreds are offered yearly. Higher level courses are frequently offered every other year. Students making long range plans for majors are urged to consult with the chairperson of the department for information concerning the sequence of offerings.

From time to time, special topics courses are offered by faculty members. These courses are not listed in the catalogue by title or description. They are conducted in a manner consistent with regular course offerings, governed by normal class schedules and examination policies; however, they may not be used to satisfy degree requirements unless so specified at the time the course was approved. Special topics courses are also used for transfer credit in some cases where no exact equivalent course is offered in the Rhodes curriculum.

Because the course topics and content vary from year to year, the courses offered through the British Studies at Oxford are not described in this catalogue. These courses are numbered from 800 to 899. Course descriptions of offerings of this program are available from the Office of British Studies or from the Registrar at Rhodes. In addition, several departments offer “Topics” courses for which the course description varies from semester to semester. Those course descriptions may be available from the appropriate department or faculty member.

Foundation Courses

Only certain courses in the Rhodes curriculum and in each department are approved to meet Foundation requirements. Each of these courses is designated in the course description in this catalog and on the class schedule for each semester online. It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of what courses in which they may be enrolled satisfy foundation requirements. Such courses are submitted by faculty members to the Foundations Curriculum Committee for approval. It is not possible for students to request foundation credit approval by the Committee for any coursework with the exception of Foundation 11. Self-initiated requests for F11 credit for certain coursework or experiences may be requested using the appropriate form available online. 
Directed Inquiries may not be used unless requested by the department and approved by the Foundations Curriculum Committee. With very few exceptions, the courses designated as fulfilling degree requirements carry four credits. An accumulation of one-credit applied music may be used to satisfy the Fine Arts or the F5 requirements.

Class Schedules

Courses carrying four credits normally meet for a total of 150 minutes per week. The four-credit classes meeting three days per week meet for fifty minutes during each class period. Those four-credit classes meeting two days per week meet for seventy-five minutes during each class period. Others will meet four or five times per week on other daily schedules. Laboratory courses carrying four credits will also meet one or two afternoons per week for the laboratory. The amount of credit does not necessarily equate to the time spent in the classroom. Outside of class assignments, readings, service-learning opportunities, and other activities supplement the actual class time.

The Academic Calendar

The academic year consists of two semesters, each containing fourteen weeks of instruction and a fifteenth week devoted to examinations. The first semester begins in late August and ends in mid-December; the second semester begins in January and ends in early May. A detailed calendar including dates of recesses and special academic days may be found elsewhere in the College catalogue or on the Rhodes web site. Students normally enroll in four courses, totaling sixteen credits, each semester. In each academic year a student should plan to earn a minimum of thirty-two credits in order to meet all graduation requirements in the standard four-year undergraduate program.

 

Anthropology and Sociology

Anthropology and Sociology offers students an opportunity to learn how to interpret and explain the structural and environmental forces that influence human action, and that have resulted in myriad cultural forms. 

Anthropology/Sociology: Faculty and Staff

Professor

Susan M. Kus. 1984. B.A., University of Michigan; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Michigan. (Archaeology, state formation, symbolic anthropology, ethno-archaeology, sub-Saharan Africa and Madagascar.)

Associate Professor

Jeanne Lopiparo. 2009. Chair. B.A., Harvard University; M.A. and Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley. (Archaeology of Mexico and Central America, social archaeology, material culture, household archaeology.)
Thomas G. McGowan. 1988. B.A., M.S.S.R., Hunter College, City University of New York; Ph.D., University of New Hampshire. (Interpretive sociology, medical sociology, community-integrative education, evaluation research.) 
Evelyn Perry. 2010. B.A., Colorado College; M.A. and Ph.D., Indiana University. (Community and urban sociology, culture, inequality, race and ethnic relations, social theory.)

Assistant Professors

Kimberly C. Kasper. 2011. B.A., Fordham University; M.Sc. Florida State University; M.Sc, Sheffield University; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, Amherst. (Human-environmental interactions, paleoethnobotany, spatial analysis, North American archaeology, ethics.)
Zandria F. Robinson. 2015. B.A. and M.A., University of Memphis; Ph.D., Northwestern University. (Race, class, gender, popular culture and sociology of culture, feminist theory, urban sociology.)

Staff

Sean Hardwick. Departmental Assistant

Requirements for a Minor in Anthropology/Sociology

A total of twenty-four (24) credits as follows:

  1. Anthropology/Sociology 103 and 105.
  2. One of the following courses: Anthropology/Sociology 380, Anthropology/Sociology 391, Anthropology/Sociology 392,  Anthropology/Sociology 393, or other theoretically intensive course by petition.
    (To be taken junior or senior year)
  3. Three additional courses (12 credits) in Anthropology/Sociology.

Requirements for a Major in Anthropology/Sociology

A total of fifty (50) credits as follows:

  1. Anthropology/Sociology 103 and 105.
  2. Anthropology/Sociology 351.
    (To be taken junior year)
  3. One of the following methods courses: Anthropology/Sociology 352, Anthropology/Sociology 254, Interdisciplinary Studies 225, or other methodologically intensive course by petition.
    (Ideally taken junior year)
  4. Anthropology/Sociology 380.
    (To be taken junior year)
  5. Anthropology/Sociology 485 and 486.
    (To be taken senior year)
  6. Six additional courses (24 credits) in Anthropology/Sociology.

The six elective courses are chosen in conference with departmental faculty members and should reflect the student’s specific interests and needs. Students may count the following courses as electives towards the major: Field Research in Environmental Archaeology (ARCE 120), Learning From Things: Material Culture Studies (ARCE 210), Archaeological Methods (ARCE 220), Archaeological Field School (ARCE 450), Geographic Information Systems (INTD 225).

Honors in Anthropology/Sociology

  1. Completion of all requirements for a Bachelor of Arts degree in Anthropology and Sociology, as well as a minimum overall grade point average of 3.50 and a minimum anthropology and sociology grade point average of 3.50.
  2. Completion of Anthropology/Sociology 495 - 496
  3. Completion of a substantial research project and paper in an area of special interest to the candidate.

Art and Art History

The Department of Art and Art History offers to the student, regardless of experience or major, the opportunity to develop a sensitivity to visual language through studio work and the study of the history of art.

Art and Art History: Faculty and Staff

Professor

David P. McCarthy. 1991. B.A., Gettysburg College; Ph.D., University of Delaware. (Modern, contemporary, and American art history.)

Associate Professors

A. Victor Coonin. 1995. B.A., Oberlin College; M.A. Syracuse University; Ph.D., Rutgers University. (Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque art history.)
Erin Harmon. 2003. Chair. B.A., San Diego State University; M.F.A., Rhode Island School of Design. (Painting and Drawing.)

Assistant Professors

Joel Parsons. 2014. B.A., Rhodes College; M.F.A., School of the Art Institute of Chicago. (Sculpture and Performance.)
Miriam G. Clinton. 2015. B.A., Yale University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania (Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World.)
Ryan Rasmussen. 2015. B.F.A., University of Minnesota; M.F.A., University of Iowa. (Sculpture and Drawing.)
Darren Douglas Floyd. 2016. B.A., The College of Wooster; M.F.A., Temple University. (Digital Arts, Video, Film and New Media.)

Director, Clough-Hanson Gallery

Joel Parsons. 2014. B.A., Rhodes College; M.F.A., School of the Art Institute of Chicago. (Sculpture and Performance.)

Curator, Visual Resources Collection

Rosanna Parrella Meindl. 2014. B.A., Lewis and Clark College; M.A., University of Oregon (Asian Studies.)

Staff

Stephanie Cage. Departmental Assistant.

The Clough-Hanson Gallery, located in Clough Hall, brings to campus exhibitions of contemporary art from September through March. In April and early May, the gallery hosts two student exhibitions: the Juried Student Exhibit and the Senior Thesis Exhibit.

The Department of Art and Art History offers three majors to meet students’ particular interests and post-graduate goals: Art, Art History, and a combined Art and Art History sequence.

Requirements for a Major in Art

For the student interested in art as a vocation, for teaching, or for further study in graduate school, a program of studies is preferable. The following courses are required.

A total of forty-eight (48) credits as follows:

  1. Studio Art: two of the following 100-level courses: 101, 105, 107.
  2. 485, 486.
  3. Art History: 151, 152.
  4. Three additional courses in studio at the 200 level or above (at least one of which must be at the 300 level)
  5. Three additional courses in the department of Art and Art History (of which no more than one may be Art History with the exception of the Art 260-Curation in Context course, or by petition.)

Requirements for a Major in Art History

For those students interested in the study of art history with graduate school as a possible goal, this program of study is suggested. The following courses are required.

A total of forty-eight (48) credits as follows:

  1. Studio Art: 101 and either 105 or 107.
  2. Art History: 151, 152, 218, 223, 242, 485,
  3. One additional course in each of the three areas, at least one of which must be 300 level:
    1. Ancient studies (Prehistoric through Roman.) (may include 209, 219, 220, 353, and 265/365-Special Topics in Ancient Art History.)
    2. Medieval through Baroque. (may include 221, 226, 228, 356, 265/365-Special Topics in Medieval through Baroque Art History.)
    3. Modern (post 1800.) (may include 234, 241, 245, 330, 260, 265/365-Special Topics in Modern Art History.)
  4. One additional course in Art History at 200 level or above.

German and/or French through the 201-level are strongly recommended for those students planning to pursue graduate work in art history.

Requirements for a Major in Art and Art History

A total of sixty-four (64) credits as follows:

  1. Studio Art: 101 and either 105 or 107.
  2. Art 485, Art 486, and Art History 485.
  3. Art History: 151, 152, 218, 223, 242.
  4. Three additional courses in studio at the 200 level or above (at least one of which must be at the 300 level.)
  5. Three additional courses in the department of Art and Art History at the 200 level or above.

Requirements for a Minor in Art

A total of twenty-eight (28) credits as follows:

  1. Studio Art: two of the following: 101, 105, 107.
  2. Art History: either 151 or 152.
  3. 485.
  4. Three additional courses in studio Art at 200-level or above.

Requirements for a Minor in Art History

A total of twenty-eight (28) credits as follows:

  1. Art: one of the following: 101, 105, 107.
  2. Art History: 151, 152, 218, 223, 242.
  3. 485.

Honors in Art and Art History

  1. In the spring of the junior year, an art major, in consultation with an appropriate member of the art faculty, may write a proposal for honors work in the senior year. The department must approve the proposal.
  2. An overall grade of A- on the thesis or project itself is required for honors credit.
 

Biology

As one of the most popular majors on campus, the Biology Department offers students opportunities to learn about all levels of biology, as well as modern methods of research and investigation. The study of biology prepares students for a wide range of career options.

 

Biology: Faculty and Staff

Professors

Terry W. Hill. 1978. B.A., University of South Florida; M.S., Ph.D., University of Florida. (Cell biology, microbiology, biology of fungi.)
Carolyn R. Jaslow. 1988. Chair. B.A., Mount Holyoke College; M.S., Ohio University; Ph.D., University of Chicago. (Histology, reproductive biology, embryology, mammalogy.)
Gary J. Lindquester. 1988. B.S., Furman University; M.S., Ph.D., Emory University. (Molecular biology, virology, immunology.)
Mary Miller. 2001. B.A., University of Tennessee; Ph.D., University of Virginia. (Genetics, microbiology, cancer biology, cell biology.)

Associate Professors

Sarah Boyle. 2009. B.A., College of William and Mary; Ph.D., Arizona State University. (Ecology, conservation biology, tropical field biology.)
Michael D. Collins. 2010. B.S., University of Arizona; M.S., Florida State University; Ph.D., University of Tennessee. (Ecology, ornithology, wildlife biology, statistics.)
Jonathan Fitz Gerald. 2007. B.S., University of California at Irvine; Ph.D., University of Chicago. (Plant biology, development.)
Alan P. Jaslow. 1984. B.S., University of Wisconsin; M.S., Ph.D., University of Michigan. (Vertebrate biology, functional morphology, animal communication.)
David Kabelik. 2009. H.B.Sc., University of Toronto; Ph.D., Arizona State University. (Neuroscience, endocrinology, physiology, animal behavior.)

Assistant Professors

Kelly A. Dougherty. 2014. B.S., West Chester University; Ph.D., Thomas Jefferson University. (Neuroscience, biophysics, neurophysiology.)
Elaine R. Frawley. 2016. B.A., Ph.D., Washington University in St. Louis. (Microbiology, molecular biology, bacterial pathogenesis.)
Stephanie Haddad. 2017. B.S., M.S., American University of Beirut; Ph.D. University of Memphis. (Entomology, evolutionary biology, systematics and phylogenetics.)
Erin S. Honsa. 2016. B.S., Queensland University of Technology (Australia); Ph.D., Baylor College of Medicine. (Microbiology, infectious disease.)
David A. Pike. 2016. B.S., North Carolina State University; M.S., Towson University; Ph.D., University of Sydney Australia. (Ecology, wildlife biology, herpetology.)
Graham Tuttle. 2017. B.S., State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry; Ph.D., Colorado State University. (Community ecology, invasion ecology, plant biology.)
Bayly S. Wheeler. 2015. B.S.E., University of Michigan; Ph.D., Duke University. (Molecular biology, genetics, genomics, microbiology.)

Staff

Dianne Cox. 2014. Biology Department Assistant. B.A., University of Mississippi.
Sarah Hasty. 2009. Biology Department Lab Manager for Frazier-Jelke Science Center. B.S., Louisiana State University; M.S., University of Memphis.
Justin A. Porter. 2017. Biology Department Lab Manager for Robertson Hall. B.S., M.S., University of Georgia.
 

Requirements for Major in Biology Leading to the B.S. Degree

A total of fifty-three to fifty-seven (53-57) credits as follows:

  1. Biology 130-131L, 140-141L.
  2. Six upper-level courses; at least four of which must have an associated lab experience. Normally four of the six courses used to satisfy these requirements must be taken within the Biology Department at Rhodes. Four credits of Research in Biology (451 or 452) can satisfy one upper-level course with lab requirement. Courses taught outside the department that can satisfy upper level course requirements for the biology major, subject to the limit indicated above, are Chem 416, Chem 414 (Chem 414 with BMB 310 may satisfy a course with lab requirement), ENVS 260, ENVS 270, Neur 270 (Neur 270 with Neur 350 may satisfy a course with lab requirement), and certain courses approved by the Department Chair for transfer credit.
  3. Biology 485 or 486.
  4. Chemistry 120-125L and 211.
  5. One course from Math 111, Math 211, Econ 290, or Psych 211.
  6. One course from Math 115, Math 121, Math 214, or Computer Science 141.

Students, in consultation with their advisers, should select a diversity of upper level courses, thereby gaining experience in different areas of biology. Satisfying the prerequisites for courses is the student’s responsibility; however, in special circumstances, students with advance permission of the instructor may enroll in a course without meeting prerequisites.
Courses and accompanying laboratories of the same name are linked co-requisites and must be taken together unless approved by petition to the department. Unless otherwise noted, courses meet under the standard class schedule and laboratories meet for a three-hour period; laboratories also often require further project work outside the scheduled lab time.
Students seeking a double major must have at least four upper-level courses for the Biology major that are not used to satisfy requirements for the other major.

Business

The Business Department teaches students both theories and methods, as well as the broader social and historical perspectives of business practices in accounting, finance, marketing, and management.

Business: Faculty and Staff

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS

Dee Birnbaum. 1991. B.A., State University of New York at Stony Brook; M.B.A., Baruch College; M.Phil. and Ph.D., City University of New York. (General management, human resource management.)
Pamela H. Church. 1988. Director, M.S. in Accounting Program. B.S. and M.S., University of Memphis; Ph.D., University of Houston. CPA. (Accountancy.)

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS

Kayla D. Booker. 2015. B.B.A., M.P.A., Ph.D., Jackson State University. C.P.A. (Accountancy.)
Sujan M. Dan. 2013. B.Tech, Kerala University, India; M.S., Ph.D., Texas A&M University. (Marketing.)
Denis Khantimirov. 2015. B.A., North Ossetian State University, Russia; M.B.A., University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Ph.D., Old Dominion University. (Marketing.) 
Kelly P. Weeks. 2015. B.A., Rhodes College; M.A. and Ph.D., The University of Memphis. (Management.)
Andrey Zagorchev. 2013. B.S., M.S., Plovdiv University, Bulgaria; M.B.A., Wright State University; Ph.D., Lehigh University. (Finance.)

PART-TIME ASSISTANT PROFESSORS

Jill P. Giles. 2014. B.S. Alfred University; M.B.A. and Ph.D. Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. CPA. (Accountancy.)
Milton L. Lovell. 2003. B.S., J.D., University of Mississippi. LL.M., New York University School of Law. CFO and General Counsel, NexAir, LLC. (Accountancy, taxation.)

INSTRUCTORS

Margaret O. Lovell. 2017. B.A., Spring Hill College; M.S., Mississippi State University. (Accountancy.)
Jade O. Planchon. 2012. B.A., Rhodes College; M.B.A., Columbia University. (Finance.)

PART-TIME INSTRUCTOR

Chris Nunn. 2010. B.A., M.S., Rhodes College. Chief Financial Officer, Security Bancorp of Tennessee, Inc. (Accountancy.)

STAFF

Linda Gibson. 2006. Departmental Assistant. B.A., Vanderbilt University; M.L.S., George Peabody College.

The Department of Business offers a major in Business. There are two tracks within the Business major: General Business and International Business. In addition, an Interdisciplinary major is offered in Economics/Business.

Master of Science in Accounting. A more concentrated study of accounting may be undertaken in the M.S. in Accounting Program offered by the Department of Business. Students who have completed an undergraduate degree in the Department of Business and/or have taken the appropriate accounting courses can finish the requirements of the M.S. in Accounting degree in two additional semesters of study.

 

Honors in Business

  1. Meet requirements for a major in Business.
  2. Business 495-496.
  3. A substantial research paper in an area of special interest to the candidate.
  4. An oral examination on the research paper.

All honors students must meet eligibility criteria established for the Honors Program.

Requirements for a Major in Business

General Business Track

A total of forty-eight (48) credits as follows:

  1. Business 241, 243, 351, 361, 371, 486.
  2. Economics 100.
  3. Economics 290 or Math 111.
  4. Math 115, 116 or 121.
  5. Two courses from one of the following areas and one course from one of the remaining areas:
    1. Accounting: Business 341, 342.
    2. Finance: Business 452, 454.
    3. Management: Business 463, 466, 467.
    4. Marketing: Business 472, 473, 474.
    5. Business 481.
    6. Business 483.
  6. Recommended: Business 460; Philosophy 206; Computer Science 141, 142; Interdisciplinary 240.

International Business Track

A total of forty-eight (48) credits as follows:

  1. Business 241, 243, 351, 361, 371, 486.
  2. Economics 100.
  3. Economics 290 or Math 111.
  4. Math 115, 116, or 121.
  5. Three courses from: Business 454, 463, 473, 483; Economics 310.
  6. Foreign Language proficiency in or completion of course of study in a modern foreign language through the second full year at the college level.
  7. Recommended: Business 460; Philosophy 206; Computer Science 141, 142; Interdisciplinary 240.

Requirements for a Minor in Business

A total of twenty-eight (28) credit hours as follows:

  1. Business 241, 243, 351, 361, 371.
  2. Economics 100.
  3. Economics 290 or Math 111. 

Chemistry

The Chemistry Department trains students in modern, interdisciplinary chemistry and prepares them for careers in chemistry research, education, and industry, as
well as for further education in chemical, medical, and other health-related fields. 

Chemistry: Faculty and Staff

Professors

Mauricio L. Cafiero. 2004. Chair, Director of Fellowships and Undergraduate Research. B.S., University of North Florida; M.A., and Ph.D., University of Arizona. (Physical Chemistry.)
Darlene M. Loprete. 1990. B.A., Clark University; Ph.D., University of Rhode Island. (Biochemistry.)
Jon Russ. 2004. B.S., Corpus Christi State University; Ph.D., Texas A&M University. (Analytical Chemistry.)

Professor Emeritus

David Y. Jeter. 1973. B.S., Texas A&M University-Commerce; Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. (Inorganic Chemistry.)

Associate Professors

Loretta Jackson-Hayes. 2003. B.S., Tougaloo College; Ph.D., University of Tennessee. (Pharmacology.)
Roberto de la Salud Bea. 2010. B.S. and M.S., University of Valencia, Spain. Ph.D., University of Nebraska. (Organic Chemistry.)

Assistant Professors

Kimberly Brien. 2012. B.S., Texas Lutheran University; M.S., Baylor University; Ph.D.,Texas Christian University. (Organic Chemistry.)
William Eckenhoff. 2015. B.S., Allegheny College; Ph.D. Duquesne University (Inorganic Chemistry).
Dana Horgen. 2014. B.S., Saint Olaf College; Ph.D., Baylor University (Organic Chemistry.)
Dhammika S. Muesse. 2007. B.S. and M.S., University of Colombo; Ph.D., University of Memphis. (Analytical Chemistry.) 
Larryn W. Peterson. 2011. B.A., Carroll College; Ph.D., University of Southern California. (Organic Chemistry.) 
Shana Stoddard. 2015. B.S. Prairie View A&M University; Ph.D. University of Mississippi. (Biochemistry)

Chemistry Storeroom Manager

Jeff R. Goode. B.S., University of Memphis.

Chemistry Instrument Technician and Chemical Safety Officer

Karen Mosely. B.S., University of Memphis; M.S. University of Memphis.

The Department is certified by the American Chemical Society as complying with its requirements for the professional training of chemists.

Honors in Chemistry

  1. Courses required: those listed for the B.S. degree as well as Chemistry 495 and 496.
  2. An original investigation of some problem in chemistry or biochemistry, usually related to research being carried on by a member of the department, is required. A creditable thesis must be presented at the end of the project. The honors project and its outcome must be approved by the student’s Honors Committee.
  3. A public presentation on the honors work is required by the department.

Requirements for Certification by the American Chemical Society

  1. Chemistry 211, 240 and 240L, 311, 408, 414 - these serve as the foundation courses. Then the in-depth courses are 212 and 212L, 312 and 312L, 406 and 415.
  2. Physics 109-110, or 111-112; 113L-114L.
  3. Mathematics 121-122.
  4. Chemistry 485 or 486 or 415.
  5. At least 4 credit hours of research (Chem 451 and/or 452.)

Requirements for a Major in Chemistry Leading to the B.S. Degree

  1. Chemistry 120, 125, 211-212, 212L, 240 and 240L 311-312, 312L,and at least 2 additional courses from the following list: 206, 406, 408, 414, 416, 422, 451-452 (total of four credits.)
  2. Physics 109-110 or 111-112; 113L-114L.
  3. Mathematics 121-122.
  4. Chemistry 485,486 or 415.

These requirements may be tailored to suit the interests and goals of the student. Some suggestions include:

  1. Chemistry graduate school: 406, 408, 414, 451-452.
  2. Biochemistry graduate school in a chemistry department: 414, 416, 451 452. (Note: students interested in graduate biochemistry may also wish to consider the Biochemistry-Molecular Biology major.)

Requirements for a Minor in Chemistry

The minor in Chemistry consists of 6 courses: 120, 211, 212, 240, and 2 additional courses: one must be at least 300-level, and the other may be at the 200-level or above. The final two courses must be at least 4-credit courses.

There are also three required lab courses:125, 240L, and 212L.

Science is increasingly interdisciplinary. Students who wish to pursue careers and/or further study in biology, neuroscience, environmental science, physics or other sciences may see the need to have a firm background in chemistry as well. By declaring a minor, students work with a minor-advisor who will help these students find and define a course of study that can complement their future plans. Students looking to pursue a career in patent or intellectual property or patent law can also benefit by having a chemistry minor.

Requirements for a major in Chemistry, Drug Design track

This major track may be of interest to students interested in a career in pharmaceutical or medicinal chemistry, medicine, pharmacy, or other health professions. Many of the faculty members in the Chemistry department conduct research in this area (6 of the 10 faculty in the department) and so we have research opportunities for students who want to pursue this major.

1. Chem 120/125: Foundations of Chemistry and Lab; Chem 211 and 212/212L: Organic Chemistry I and II and Lab; Chem 240/240L: Analytical Chemistry with lab; Chem 311 and 312/312L: Physical Chemistry I and II and Lab; Chem 414: Biochemistry; Chem 411: Medicinal and Computational Chemistry with lab; Chem 416: Mechanisms of Drug Action; and Chem 415: Advanced Biochemistry

2. Math 121 and 122: Calculus I and II

3. Phys: 109/110 or 111/112 with labs: Physics I and II and Labs

Economics

The Economics Department, through its emphasis on logical
and quantitative analysis and communication skills, serves
as prepares students interested in careers in business, law, medicine, government, non-profits, and international relations, as well as in academic roles. 

Economics: Faculty and Staff

PROFESSORS

Marshall K. Gramm. 2000. Chair. B.A., Rice University; Ph.D., Texas A & M University. (Applied microeconomics.)
John E. Murray. 2011. Joseph R. Hyde III Professor of Political Economy. B.A., Oberlin College; M.S., University of Cincinnati; M.A., Ph.D., The Ohio State University. (Economic history.)
C. Nicholas McKinney. 2003. Robert D. McCallum Professor of Economics. B.A., B.S., Centenary College of Louisiana; Ph.D., Texas A & M University. (Experimental economics, applied microeconomics.)

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

Teresa Beckham Gramm. 1999. B.A., Agnes Scott College; Ph.D., University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. (International economics.)

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS

Bruno D. Badia. 2015. B.A., Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil; M.A., Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil; Ph.D., Stony Brook University. (Industrial organization, game theory, applied microeconomics.
Courtney A. Collins. 2013. B.A., Rhodes College; Ph.D., Texas A&M University. (Applied economics.)
Jaqueline Oliveira. 2016. B.A., Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil; M.Sc., University of Sao Paulo, Brazil; M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University. (Development, labor, family and urban economics.)

VISITING PROFESSOR

Erin Kaplan. 2016. B.A., University of Kansas; Ph.D., University of California at Santa Barbara. (Labor and health economics.)

STAFF

Linda Gibson. 2006. Departmental Assistant. B.A., Vanderbilt University; M.L.S., George Peabody College.

Honors in Economics

  1. Requirements for a major in Economics.
  2. Economics 495-496 (instead of Economics 486).
  3. A substantial research paper in an area of special interest to the candidate.
  4. An oral examination on the research paper.

All honors students must meet eligibility criteria established for the Honors Program.

Requirements for a Major in Economics

A total of forty-eight (48) credits as follows:

  1. Economics 100, 201, 202, 290, 420, 486.
  2. Twenty credits from Economics 250, 265, 305, 308, 310, 311, 312, 317, 318, 323, 331, 339, 343, 345, 349, 357, 377, 407, 440, 465; Math 342.
  3. Mathematics 115 or 121. (For graduate study, Math 121 and 122 should be considered.)
  4. Recommended: Mathematics 121, 122. Students planning on attending graduate school should consider the Mathematics and Economics interdisciplinary major.

In addition, interdisciplinary majors are offered in:

  • Economics and Business.
  • Economics and International Studies.
  • Mathematics and Economics.
  • Political Economy (an interdisciplinary program.)

Requirements for a Minor in Economics

A total of twenty (20) credits in Economics as follows:

  1. Economics 100, 201, 202.
  2. Eight credits from Economics 250, 265, 290, 305, 308, 310, 311, 312, 317, 318, 323, 331, 339, 343, 345, 349, 357, 377, 407, 420, 440, 465.

Educational Studies

Program Vision and Goals

The Educational Studies Program at Rhodes College is committed to combining a liberal arts education with opportunities for our students to integrate classroom learning with practice in the complex, vibrant, and diverse urban settings of Memphis, TN. The goal of our program is to build upon this commitment to produce future leaders, teachers, researchers, and education policy makers who have hands-on experience in local public schools and have a firm commitment to social justice and anti-oppressive practices in educational spaces.

Program Mission

In collaboration with colleagues on campus and community partners and in keeping with Rhodes’ continuing commitment to academic excellence, the Educational Studies Program strives to:

provide opportunities for students to engage in the study of education as an interdisciplinary field of inquiry and advocacy;

prepare educators, advocates, and thought leaders to provide service and leadership in culturally diverse, economically challenged educational systems and communities;

provide students with unique opportunities at a leading liberal arts college situated in the heart of a resource-rich urban setting.

 

 

Background Checks

Tennessee Code Annotated (TCA 49-5-5610) requires all students entering state approved educator preparation programs to submit the result of a criminal back check to the institution. In compliance with this requirement, Shelby County Schools (SCS) requires criminal background checks for Rhodes College students who are placed in their schools for clinical experiences and internships with P – 12 students. The results will be sent to a Rhodes College representative. For more information, contact the Director for Teacher Licensure and Fields Placements, Dr. Kathy Evans (evansk@rhodes.edu).

Educational Studies: Faculty and Staff

Professors

Natalie K. Person. 1994. Chair. B.A., University of Mississippi; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Memphis. (Cognitive psychology: learning technologies; educational psychology.)

Assistant Professors

Zachary Casey. 2014. B.A.E. and M.A., Arizona State University; Ph.D., University of Minnesota. (Curriculum and Instruction, Multicultural Education, Critical Pedagogy, Teacher Education.)
Laura Taylor. 2017. B.S. Cornell University; M.Ed. University of Saint Thomas; Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin. (Elementary Education, Urban Language and Literacies.)

Program Committee

Charles McKinney, Associate Professor of History
Marcus Pohlmann, Professor of Political Science
Elizabeth Thomas, Associate Professor of Psychology, Director of Urban Studies

Additional Affiliated Faculty

Courtney Collins, Assistant Professor of Economics 
Rebecca Finlayson, Associate Professor of English 
Dana Horgen, Assistant Professor of Chemistry
Felix Kronenberg, Associate Professor of German
Geoff Maddox, Assistant Professor of Psychology 
Pat Shade, Associate Professor of Philosophy 
Marsha Walton, Professor of Psychology 
​Jeanne Wilson, Long-term Adjunct Faculty

Staff

Kathy D. Evans. 2016. Director of Teacher Licensure and Field Placements. B.A., Wheaton College (Norton, MA); M.S., Peabody College; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. (Early childhood education, Child development, Curriculum, Developmental Psychology)

Licensure to Teach

Students can earn elementary (grades K - 5) or secondary licensure (grades 6 -12) within the Teaching and Learning track of the Educational Studies major. The licensure program prepares students to teach in either elementary schools or middle and/or high schools in one of twelve endorsement areas: American Government, English, History, Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry, Spanish, French, German, Latin, Russia, and Chinese. The course of study for secondary licensure students is designed with guidance from faculty members in the discipline in which the student is being certified as well as with faculty in the Educational Studies Program. All secondary licensure candidates are required to double major in Educational Studies and their endorsement discipline. Elementary licensure does not require a double major. Students who are interested in teacher licensure should contact our Director of Teacher Licensure and Field Placements in the early stages of the academic planning process. Applications to the Rhodes College Teacher Licensure Program can be found on the program's website.

 

Licensure to teach is a function of state governments. Institutions and agencies that offer licensure are approved by their respective state departments and boards of education. Tennessee licensure is transferable to all 50 states; some states may require additional exams or content. A guide to certification reciprocity is available through Certification Map. https://certificationmap.com/states/reciprocity-disclaimer/ Students wishing to teach in other states are advised to review the licensure requirements on the appropriate state's department of education website.

 

 

 

Requirements for a Major in Educational Studies

A total of fifty-one (51) credits for students not seeking licensure;  a total of fifty-two (52) credits for elementary licensure students; a total of forty seven (47) credits for secondary licensure students (NOTE: All licensure students will student teach in a post-baccalaureate ninth semester in which they will register for 12 credits):

  1. Core Requirements (7 courses)
     
    1. Foundations (both required)
      1. Foundations of Education ED 201 (F8)
      2. Educational Psychology PSY 222
    2. Human Behavior (one of the following)
      1. Infant and Child Development PSY 229 (F11)
      2. Adolescence PSY 230
      3. Learning & Motivation PSYC 326
    3. Quantitative Skills (one of the following)
      1. Psychological Statistics PSY 211 (F6)
      2. Econ Stat ECON 290 (F6)
      3. Probability Stat MATH 111 (F6)
    4. Philosophy, Ethics, Policy, & History (one of the following)
      1. Philosophy of Education PHIL 270 (F11)
      2. Ethics PHIL 301 (F1)
      3. Urban Education Policy POLSCI 240
      4. Some sections of ED 265
    5. Educational Equity and Disparities (one of the following)
      1. Urban Education ED 220
      2. African American Experience in U.S. Schools ED 225 (F9, F11)
      3. Race, Class, Gender, & Sexuality ED 320 (F9)
      4. Some sections of ED 265
    6. Education Senior Seminar 485
  2. Community-integrative Education ED 360/460 (three or four semesters) (3 or 4 credits total)
    1. All students in Educational Studies are required to complete at least 1 credit of EDUC 360: Field Experience.  Each track has additional requirements, detailed below.
    2. Teaching and Learning: Elementary students must complete 4 credits of EDUC 360 in Shelby County Schools; each of these field experiences (1 credit each) will have a different subject matter focus. Secondary students must complete 3 credits of EDUC 360 in Shelby County Schools. These three semesters will include (in any order) a semester each in a high school, middle school, and special education/special needs setting (any grades 6-12).
    3. Community and Social Change: Students must complete 1 section of EDUC 360, Field Experience in Shelby County Schools (any grades K-12).  Students must complete 2 additional credits, of either EDUC 360 or EDUC 460.
    4. Policy and Reform: Students must complete 1 section of EDUC 360, Field Experience in Shelby County Schools (any grades K-12).  Students must complete 2 additional credits, of either EDUC 360 or EDUC 460.
    5. Students will have their first field placement in their first semester after declaring. The ED 460 course instructor will work with majors to ensure that the school/community placement complements each student’s course of study.
    6. Students must adhere to all Shelby County School rules and protocols in their placements.​
    7. EDUC 460 is an Educational Studies Internship, which can be taken for 1-4 credits.  Please contact Educational Studies Faculty and Staff for additional information about possible internships.
  3. Three tracks (five courses/20 credits for students not seeking licensure;five courses/20 credits for students elementary licensure students; four courses/16 credits for secondary licensure students). All majors will choose one of three following tracks (1) Teaching and Learning; (2) Community and Social Change, (3) Policy and Reform.
     
    1. Teaching and Learning - (licensure optional) - supports students interested in entering the teaching profession as teachers or administrators and those interested in seeking licensure. Licensure within this track is optional. Students who wish to teach at the secondary level must also major in the discipline in which they plan to teach. All licensure candidates will register for 12 credits and student teach in a ninth semester.

      Required courses for those seeking elementary licensure (five courses, 20 credits)

      1. Principles of Curriculum and Instruction ED 355
      2. Educational Technologies ED 300
      3. Literacy & Reading in the Content Areas EDUC 310
      4. Elementary Literacies EDUC 370
      5. One additional course from electives

      Required courses for those seeking secondary licensure (four courses, 16 credits)

      1. Principles of Curriculum and Instruction ED 355
      2. How to Write: Academic Writing and the Pedagogies that Support It ENG 290 (F2i and F11)
      3. Educational Technologies ED 300
      4. Literacy & Reading in the Content Areas EDUC 310
       
  4. Community and Social Change - ­supports students who are interested in educational practices outside traditional educational settings.  Prepares students who are interested in adult literacy and basic education, youth development, educational work in non-profits, museum education, artists-in-residence, community education, environmental educational, etc.

 

  1. Policy and Reform - provides opportunities for interdisciplinary explorations of pressing social and educational issues on local, national, and international levels. Prepares students who are interested in issues of equity and diversity, civic education, feminist and critical education, and the media.

    Elective courses for all three tracks (at least two 300-400 level courses)
    1. Gender and Society ANSO 231
    2. Gender Politics and Protests ANSO 233
      The Sociology of MLK in Practice: A Place-Based Study of King and the St. Augustine Civil Rights Movement ANSO 235 (F9, F11)
    3. Urban Social Problems ANSO 241
    4. Social Movements ANSO 243
    5. The Sociology of Community-Integrative Education ANSO 245 (F11, F2i)
    6. Gender and Environment ANSO 273
    7. Race and Ethnicity in American Society ANSO 331
    8. Intro to Social Research ANSO 351
    9. Black Feminist Thought ANSOC 365
    10. Hip-Hop & the Post-Soul South ANSOC 365
    11. Anthropology of Social Change ANSO 379
    12. Prejudice and the Human Condition ANSO 391
    13. Sociology of Violence and Peace Making ANSO 392
    14. Economics of Education ECON 265
    15. Topics in Education EDUC 265
    16. Directed Research in Education EDUC 451
    17. Study in African American Literature ENGL 264
    18. African American Literature ENGL 364
    19. Junior Seminar Critical Theory ENGL 385
    20. Introductory Seminars in History (when topics are relevant) HIST 105 (F2i, F3)
    21. Selected Topics in History (when topics are relevant) HIST 205 (F3)
    22. The United States in the Twentieth Century HIST 233 (F3)
    23. African American History HIST 242 (F3, F9)
    24. Civil Rights Movement HIST 243 (F3)
    25. History of Memphis HIST 248 (F3)
    26. Gender in the United States HIST 249
    27. Slavery in the United States HIST 342
    28. Civil Rights in Memphis HIST 345
    29. African American Activism HIST 447
    30. Government and Politics of Africa IS 251 (F9)
    31. International Human Rights IS 336
    32. Philosophy of Race PHIL 255
    33. Philosophy of Education PHIL 270 (F11)
    34. Introduction to Public Policy POLSC 205
    35. Urban Politics and Policy POLSC 206
    36. Race and Ethnic Politics POLSC 207
    37. Modern Ideologies POLSC 214
    38. Justice, Equality, and Liberty POLSC 218
    39. Black Political Thought POLSC 230
    40. Poverty and Public Policy POLSC 318
    41. Race, Housing and Urban Revitalization POLSC 319
    42. Healthcare Policy 320 POLSC 320
    43. Community Psychology PSY 250
    44. Gender and Sexualities PSY 280
    45. Social Issues in Ethical & Religious Perspective RS 232 (F1)
    46. Theologies of Liberation RS 259
    47. Health Equity Internship RS 460
    48. #DOBLACKLIVESMATTER? THEA 265
    49. Intro to Urban Studies URBN 201 (F8, F11)
    50. Research Methods in Urban Studies URBN 220 (F8, F11)
    51. Urban Geography URBN 230 (F2i, F8)
    52. Introduction to Urban and Community Health URBN 240 (F8)
    53. Intercultural Knowledge & Competence URBN 250 (F9)
    54. Urban Field Research URBN 362

      Additional electives for Teaching & Learning track only:
       
    55. Environmental Issues in Southern Africa BIOL 212
    56. Collaborative Chemistry Communities CHEM 260 (2 credits)
    57. Language Acquisition and Pedagogy GRS/MLL 240
    58. Principles of Curriculum and Instruction EDUC 355
    59. How to Write: Academic Writing and the Pedagogies that Support it ENGL 290 (F2i and F11, 4 credits)
    60. Advanced Grammar ENGL 380
    61. Advanced Language and Civilization SPAN 301
    62. Spanish American Literature and Culture SPAN 306
    63. Children’s Literature: Page to Stage THEA 254

      Additional elective courses in Community and Social Change track:
       
    64. Management of Organizations BUSCOM 361
    65. Global Politics IS 220 (F8)
    66. Comparative Ecopolitics IS 341 (F8)
    67. U.S. Politics POLSC 151 (F8, F2i some sections)
    68. Non-profits in the City URBN 340
    69. Urban Studies Internship (Crosstown Arts Section) URBN 460

      Additional electives for Policy & Reform track:
       
    70. Management of Organizations BUSCOM 361
    71. Global Politics IS 220 (F8)
    72. Comparative Ecopolitics IS 341 (F8)
    73. U.S. Politics POLSC 151 (F8, F2i some sections)
    74. Philosophy of Law PHIL 216
    75. Politics of Migration IS 340

 

Requirements for a Minor in Educational Studies

The Minor in Educational Studies requires 24 credits:

1. Education 201 & 355.

2. Psychology 222.

3. Twelve credits selected from the following courses: Education 220, 225, 265, 300, 310, 320, 370; Education 360, 451, 460 (2 or 4 credits); Economics 295 (2 credits); Language Acquisition and Pedagogy GRS/MLL 240; Philosophy 255, 270; Political Science 240; Psychology 229, 230, 250, 326; Urban Studies 250.

English

From the classics to the contemporary, the Department of English offers Rhodes students a wide array of courses in literature, creative writing and film. Students develop the ability to analyze and create with an emphasis on establishing strong writing skills. 

English: Faculty and Staff

Professors

Gordon Bigelow. 1998. The T. K. Young Chair of Literature. A.B., Brown University; M.A., University of New Hampshire; Ph.D., University of California, Santa Cruz. (Nineteenth-century Britain and Ireland, Cultural Studies.) 
Marshall Boswell. 1996. B.A., Washington and Lee University; M.A., Washington University; Ph.D., Emory University. (American Literature.)
Scott Newstok. 2007. B.A., Grinnell College; Ph.D., Harvard University. (Shakespeare, Poetics.)
Brian W. Shaffer. 1990. Associate Dean of Academic Affairs for Faculty Development. B.A., Washington University; Ph.D., University of Iowa. (Twentieth-century British and Irish literature, modern novel.)

Associate Professors

Rebecca Finlayson. 2001. Director of College Writing, Director of the Rhodes Summer Writing Institute. B.A., Smith College; M.A. and Ph.D., Emory University. (Early Modern British Literature.)
Lori Garner. 2009. B.A., Hendrix College; M.A. University of Arkansas; Ph.D., University of Missouri. (Medieval Studies, Oral Tradition.)
Judith Haas. 2002. B.A., Wesleyan University; Ph.D., University of California, Santa Cruz. (Medieval Studies, Women’s Studies.)
Leslie Petty. 2003. The Charles R. Glover Chair of English Studies. B.A., Emory University; M.A., Louisiana State University; Ph.D., University of Georgia. (American Literature.)
Rashna Wadia Richards. 2008. B.A., Narsee Monjee College, Mumbai, India; M.A., University of Mumbai, India; M.A., West Virginia University; Ph.D., University of Florida. (Film Studies.)
Seth Rudy. 2010. B.F.A., New York University (Film and Television); M.A., New York University; Ph.D., New York University. (Eighteenth Century English Literature, British Romanticism.)

Assistant Professors

Amy Benson. 2016. B.S., Bowling Green State University; M.F.A., University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (Creative Non-Fiction.)
Chanelle Benz. 2017. B.F.A., Boston University; M.F.A., Syracuse University. (Creative Writing, Fiction.)
Stephanie Elsky. 2017. B.A., Columbia University; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. (Early Modern Literature.)
Ernest Gibson, III. 2012. B.A., Fisk University; M.A., Purdue University; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Massachusetts-Amherst. (Afro-American Studies.)
Jason Richards. 2008. B.A., and M.A., California State University, Long Beach; Ph.D., University of Florida. (American Literature, Postcolonial Literature.)
Caki Wilkinson. 2012. B.A., Rhodes College; M.F.A. (Poetry) Johns Hopkins University; Ph.D., University of Cincinnati. (English and Comparative Literature.)

Staff

Lorie W. Yearwood. 2006. Departmental Assistant. A.A.S., State Technical Institute at Memphis.

Honors in English

  1. Courses required: fulfillment of the requirements for a major in English; English 495-496.
  2. A substantial, in-depth thesis.
  3. Approval by the English Honors Committee.

Requirements for a Major in English

A total of 11 courses (forty-four credits) as follows:

Track I: Concentration in Literature:

  1. English 285, normally taken by the end of the sophomore year.
  2. English 385, normally taken in spring of the junior year (students abroad may take this course in senior year).
  3. English 485, normally taken in the senior year.
  4. Eight (8) additional courses in English, 190 or above, at least 6 of which must be in literature.
  5. Of the eleven required courses, a minimum of seven (7) must be numbered 300 or above. (English 460 does not fulfill this requirement.)
  6. Of the eleven required courses, a minimum of three (3) must be in literature written before 1800 (i.e., 219, 230, 260, 315-345, 359, 485 where topic is appropriate) with at least two (2) numbered 300 or above.

Track II: Concentration in Literature and Creative Writing:

  1. English 285, normally taken by the end of the sophomore year.
  2. English 385, normally taken in spring of the junior year. (Students abroad may take this course in the senior year.)
  3. One of the following sequences of major genre workshops (three courses):
    1. English 200, 300, 400 (Poetry Workshops)
    2. English 201, 301, 401 (Fiction Workshops)
  4. One additional course chosen from English 200, 201, 203, 204, 205, 300, 301, 400, 401
  5. English 485, normally taken in the senior year.
  6. One course in literature written before 1800 numbered 300 or above (English 315, 319, 320, 322, 323, 325, 332, 335, 336, 340, 345, 359, 485 where topic is appropriate).
  7. Two (2) additional literature courses numbered 300 or above. (English 460 does not fulfill this requirement.)
  8. One additional course in literature, 190 or above. (One film course or internship may be counted in this category.)

Note: Those considering the concentration in writing should contact one of the creative writing professors for early advising, preferably by the end of the first year.

Requirements for a Minor in English

A total of 5 courses (20 credits) as follows:

  1. Two courses at the 190 or 200 level
  2. Three additional courses in English numbered 300 or higher.

The Writing Center

The Department oversees a writing service available to all Rhodes students. Student tutors are available daily to assist students with written work. 

Greek and Roman Studies

The Greek and Roman Studies program helps students develop a thorough understanding of the ancient Greek, Roman, and associated cultures as the basis for the artistic, scientific, social, and political traditions of Western society.  

In addition to this disciplinary function, the department fulfills other roles in the college's curriculum:

The F10 Degree Requirement. The degree requirement in languages may be met by the successful completion of any appropriate four-credit course numbered 201 or higher or by demonstrating proficiency through placement into a language course at a level above 201 and approval by the appropriate language faculty. Students who take 201 (or higher) or the equivalent at another institution can earn transfer credit, but must still demonstrate proficiency in the specific language before the degree requirement is satisfied. This policy pertains to languages that are taught at Rhodes. Students for whom English is a second language may have this requirement waived.

Rhodes offers a secondary licensure program within the Teaching and Learning track of the Educational Studies major. This program prepares students to teach middle and/or high school in one of eleven endorsement areas, including Latin. The course of study for secondary licensure students is designed with guidance from faculty members in the discipline in which the student is being certified as well as members of the Educational Studies Program. All secondary licensure candidates are required to double major in Educational Studies and their endorsement discipline.

Greek and Roman Studies: Faculty and Staff

Professors

Geoffrey W. Bakewell. 2011. B.A., Yale University; Ph.D., Brown University. (tragedy, Athenian democracy, Greek and Latin languages and literatures.)

Associate Professors

Kenneth S. Morrell. 1993. B.A., Stanford University; M.A. and Ph.D., Harvard University. (Greek and Latin languages and literatures, information technology.)
Susan Satterfield. 2008. B.A., University of Alabama; Ph.D., Princeton University. (Roman history, religion, and historiography, Greek and Latin languages and literatures.)
David H. Sick. 1997. Chair. B.A., College of Wooster; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Minnesota. (Greek and Roman religion, Indo-European mythology, Roman social history, Greek and Latin languages and literatures.)

Assistant Professors

Joseph N. Jansen. 2007. B.A., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin. (ancient history, economy, and historiography, Greek and Latin languages and literatures.)
Ariel López.  2014.  B.A., University of Buenos Aires; Ph.D. Princeton University. (late antique history, monasticism, Coptic language and literature.)
R. Scott Garner. 2016. B.A. University of Missouri--Columbia; Ph.D., Princeton University. (oral tradition, Greek epic and poetry, Greek and Latin languages and literatures.)

Honors in Greek and Roman Studies

Detailed information about graduating with honors in Greek and Roman Studies is available from the department. Only students with a minimum overall GPA of 3.5 and a GPA within GRS of 3.7 by the end of the fall semester of their junior year will be eligible to pursue honors. In addition to fulfilling the requirements for the major with a concentration in either Greek, Latin, Classical Studies, or material culture, students seeking honors will be expected to complete the following additional work:

  1. GRS 495-496: Honors Tutorial. (GRS 496 will count as GRS 475-6 for students attempting to graduate with honors.)
  2. An honors thesis or project that demonstrates an exceptional understanding of one or more aspects of the ancient world. Such a project might take the form, for example, of a written thesis, an analysis of archaeological fieldwork, or the production of a tragedy or comedy.

Programs Abroad

To help students experience the artifacts of the Greeks and Romans and other Mediterranean cultures in the areas where they lived, GRS offers a number of opportunities for travel-study abroad. As described below in the descriptions for GRS 305 and Latin 232, the department regularly offers courses that involve travel and study in Greece, Italy, and other countries in the Mediterranean and Middle East. Faculty members also contribute to collaborative initiatives that provide opportunities for research, and the department secures places for students in archaeological excavations and surveys, such as those at the harbor at Kenchreai, Greece. European Studies features course work at Sewanee, Rhodes and Oxford in conjunction with visits to sites in Great Britain, Italy, Greece, and Turkey. (More information about European Studies is available in the catalog in the section on “Opportunities for Study Abroad and Off-Campus Study.”) Finally, the college is a member of the American School of Classical Studies in Athens and the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome, which operate centers for study and research in Greece and Italy respectively.

 

Requirements for a Major in Greek and Roman Studies

Concentration in Classical Languages (Greek and/or Latin):

A total of thirteen courses (46 credits) as follows:

  1. Six courses (24 credits) of ancient Greek and/or Latin. Four of these courses must be above the 201 level, and the student must take at least two courses in each language.
  2. Greek and Roman Studies 275, 474, 475, and 476.
  3. Three courses (12 credits) on the culture and civilization of ancient Greece and Rome. The courses below count toward this requirement:
    • Art 209, 218, 219, 220, 253, 365 (when appropriate)
    • European Studies: Art 836, Greek and Roman Studies 833, 834, History 830, Philosophy 835
    • Greek and Roman Studies: 150, 245, 250, 255, 260, 265, 270, 283, 305, 310, 315, 361
    • History 211, 221, 222, 311, 312, 313
    • Humanities (Search) 101, 102, 201 (Classical Track)
    • Philosophy 201
    • Political Science 311
    • Religious Studies 214, 280, 281, 282, 283, 285, 286
    • Theatre 280

Concentration in Classical Studies:

A total of thirteen courses (46 credits) as follows:

  1. Three courses (12 credits) of ancient Greek and/or Latin beyond 201. These may be in one language solely or a combination of the two.
  2. Greek and Roman Studies 275, 474, 475, and 476.
  3. Six courses (24 credits) on the culture and civilization of ancient Greece and Rome. The courses below count toward this requirement:
    • Art 209, 218, 219, 220, 253, 365 (when appropriate)
    • European Studies: Art 836, Greek and Roman Studies 833, 834, History 830, Philosophy 835
    • Greek and Roman Studies: 150, 245, 250, 255, 260, 265, 270, 283, 305, 310, 315, 361
    • History 211, 221, 222, 311, 312, 313
    • Humanities (Search) 101, 102, 201 (Classical Track)
    • Philosophy 201
    • Political Science 311
    • Religious Studies 214, 280, 281, 282, 283, 285, 286
    • Theatre 280

Concentration in Material Culture:

A total of thirteen courses (46 credits) as follows:

  1. One course (4 credits) of ancient Greek or Latin beyond 201.
  2. Greek and Roman Studies 275, 474, 475, and 476.
  3. Archaeology 220 or Anthropology 254: Archaeological Methods.
  4. Three courses (12 credits) from the following courses:
    • Art: 209, 218, 219, 220, 253, 365 (when appropriate)
  5. Four courses (16 credits) from the following courses:
    • Anthropology 290/Archaeology 210
    • Chemistry 107
    • European Studies: Art 836, Greek and Roman Studies 833, 834, History 830
    • Greek and Roman Studies 150, 245, 250, 255, 260, 265, 270, 283, 305, 315, 361
    • Humanities (Search) 101, 102, 201 (Classical Track)
    • History 211, 221, 222, 311, 312, 313
    • Religious Studies 260

Requirements for a Minor in Greek and Roman Studies

Concentration in Classical Languages (Greek and/or Latin)

A total of seven courses (28 credits) as follows:

  1. Four courses (16 credits) of ancient Greek and/or Latin. Three of these courses must be above the 201 level, and the student must take at least one course in each language.
  2. Greek and Roman Studies 275.
  3. Two courses (8 credits) on the culture and civilization of ancient Greece and Rome. The courses below count toward this requirement:
    • Art 209, 218, 219, 220, 253, 365 (when appropriate)
    • European Studies: Art 836, Greek and Roman Studies 833, 834, History 830, Philosophy 835
    • Greek and Roman Studies: 150, 245, 250, 255, 260, 265, 270, 283, 305, 315, 361
    • History 211, 221, 222, 311, 312, 313
    • Humanities (Search) 101, 102, 201 (Classical Track)
    • Philosophy 201
    • Political Science 311
    • Religious Studies 214, 280, 281, 282, 283, 285, 286
    • Theatre 280

Concentration in Classical Studies

A total of seven courses (28 credits) as follows:

  1. Two courses (8 credits) of ancient Greek and/or Latin beyond 201. These may be in one language solely or a combination of the two.
  2. Greek and Roman Studies 275.
  3. Four courses (16 credits) of courses on the culture and civilization of ancient Greece and Rome. The courses below count toward this requirement:
    • Art 209, 218, 219, 220, 253, 365 (when appropriate)
    • European Studies: Art 836, Greek and Roman Studies 833, 834, History 830, Philosophy 835
    • Greek and Roman Studies: 150, 245, 250, 255, 260, 265, 270, 283, 305, 315, 361
    • History 211, 221, 222, 311, 312, 313
    • Humanities (Search) 101, 102, 201 (Classical Track)
    • Philosophy 201
    • Political Science 311
    • Religious Studies 214, 280, 281, 282, 283, 285, 286
    • Theatre 280

Concentration in Material Culture

A total of seven courses (28 credits) as follows:

  1. One course (4 credits) of ancient Greek or Latin beyond 201.
  2. Greek and Roman Studies 275
  3. Archaeology 220 or Anthropology 254: Archaeological Methods.
  4. Two courses (8 credits) from the following courses:
    • Art 209, 210, 218, 219, 220, 253, 365 (when appropriate)
  5. Two courses (8 credits) from the following courses:
    • Anthropology 290/Archaeology 210
    • Chemistry 107
    • European Studies: Art 836, Greek and Roman Studies 833, 834, History 830
    • Greek and Roman Studies 150, 245, 250, 255, 260, 265, 270, 283, 305, 315, 361
    • Humanities (Search) 101, 102, 201 (Classical Track)
    • History 211, 221, 222, 311, 312, 313
    • Religious Studies 260

History

 

The Department of History at Rhodes has a national reputation for preparing students to think critically about the historical forces that have shaped the world’s civilizations and cultures, to see the links between the past and the present, to become clear and effective writers and speakers, and to apply their knowledge as thoughtful citizens of the world.  A wide range of course offerings, internships, fellowships, and research opportunities empower students to prepare for success in any career path which they choose and to find their place within the ongoing human story.

Designed for students who want to pursue the professional work of historians, we also offer a concentration in Public History -- one of a very few undergraduate program of its kind in the nation.  Students fully engage in the work of historic preservation, museum studies, or library and archive studies.  Unique courses and experiences prepare students for professions or graduate training in the field through hands-on internships with our community partners.  In these internships, students work behind-the-scenes of some of Memphis’ premiere public history institutions helping to research, create, and maintain displays; working to restore, digitize, and publish one-of-a-kind archival material; giving tours; and promoting the work of their internship institution within the city.  Students work closely with professionals in the field to develop the skills of a public historian.  And they talk with members of the public about history, bringing the past to life for Memphians and the millions of tourists who come to the Bluff City.  

Decades’ worth of data gathered by the Rhodes College Alumni Office shows how Rhodes History alumni have succeeded in an amazingly wide range of occupations from filmmaking and urban planning to museums and teaching at the university level.  Our graduates work as members of the clergy, account executives, business managers, musicians, journalists, members of the US military, counselors, business analysts, marketers, librarians and archivists, coaches, IT specialists, pilots, social workers, brokers, Peace Corps veterans, real estate developers, non-profit executives, artists, flight attendants, restauranteurs, land use planners -- and that’s just the beginning. 

 

History Course Numbering

History 100-level courses. Designed for first-year students and sophomores, these seminars focus on specific topics. These courses are writing intensive and fulfill one of the "written communication" requirements (F2i) under the Foundations Curriculum. These courses also fulfill the "historical forces" (F3) requirement.

History 200-level courses. These courses cover a broad chronological span or large geographical area and are introductory in nature. In addition to mastering course content, students will begin to learn to think historically through interpretive writing assignments that require them to draw from and engage with course material and readings. Such courses are open to all students and normally fulfill the "historical forces" Foundation (F3) requirement. Several of these courses also fulfill other Foundations, including "meaning and value" (F1), "institution and society" (F8), and "cultural perspectives" (F9).

History 300-level courses. These courses focus on specific topics or time periods, while paying significant attention to historiography. Students are required to make a significant oral presentation. Sophomore standing is required for these courses, unless otherwise noted. Several of these courses also fulfill Foundation requirements, including "meaning and value" (F1), "literary texts" (F4), and "cultural perspectives" (F9).

History 400-level courses. These courses focus on specific topics or time periods, while paying significant attention to historiography. Students are required to complete a substantive research paper in which they engage substantially with primary sources. Sophomore standing is required for these courses.

History: Faculty and Staff

Professors

Michael R. Drompp. 1989. Professor. B.A., M.A., and Ph.D., Indiana University. (East Asian history, China and Japan, Inner Asian history) 
Timothy S. Huebner. 1995.. The Irma O. Sternberg Professor of History. B.A., University of Miami; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Florida. (U.S. South, nineteenth century, U.S. constitutional/legal history)
Jonathan Judaken. 2011. The Spence Wilson Chair in the Humanities. B.A. University of California, San Diego; M.A. and Ph.D. University of California, Irvine (Modern Europe, cultural and intellectual history) 
Lynn B. Zastoupil. 1988. B.A., Dickinson State College; M.A., University of Texas; Ph.D., University of Minnesota. (Modern Britain, India, European intellectual history)

Associate Professors

Jeffrey H. Jackson. 2000. Chair. The J. J. McComb Chair in History B.S., Vanderbilt University; Ph.D., University of Rochester. (Modern Europe, France, cultural history, natural disasters)
Michael J. LaRosa. 1995. B.A., George Washington University; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Miami. (Contemporary Latin America, Colombia, church history)
Seok-Won Lee. 2011. B.A., and M.A., Yonsei University; Ph.D. Cornell University. (Modern East Asia)
Charles W. McKinney. 2004. B.A., Morehouse College; M.A. and Ph.D., Duke University. (African-American history, civil rights studies, twentieth-century United States)
Robert F. Saxe. 2003. B.A., Reed College; Ph.D., University of Illinois. (Twentieth-century United States, political history, war and society)
Etty Terem. 2008. B.A. and M.A., Tel Aviv University; Ph.D., Harvard University. (Modern Middle East and North Africa, Islamic law and society)
Tait S. Keller. 2008. B.A., University of Rochester; M.A. and Ph.D., Georgetown University. (Environmental history, modern Europe, Germany)

Assistant Professors

Hannah Barker. 2014. B.A. University of Chicago; M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D., Columbia University. (Medieval Europe and Mediterranean)
Ariel Eisenberg.  2017.  Assistant Professor.  B.A., Barnard College; M.A., University of Wisconsin-Madison; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison. (History of women, gender, and sexuality; LGBTQ history; disability history; urban history) 
 

Staff

Carol E. Kelley. Departmental Assistant. 2016. B.A., Christian Brothers University. 
 

Honors in History

  1. Completion of all requirements for a Bachelor of Arts degree in History, as well as a minimum overall grade point average of 3.50 and a minimum history grade point average of 3.50.
  2. Completion of History 495-496.
  3. Completion of a major research project, culminating in a research paper and an oral presentation. The student normally begins preparing a proposal by taking a directed inquiry in the spring of the junior year.The formal research proposal must be accepted by the Department early in the student’s senior year. The project must be completed and approved by the supervising committee by April.

Requirements for a Major in History

Requirements for a major in History

A total of 11 courses (44 credits) as follows:

  1. History 300 (The Historian’s Craft)
  2. History 485 (Senior Seminar)
  3. Nine (9) additional courses at the 100, 200, 300, and 400 levels, selected according to the following principles:
    1. Of the nine courses, no more than one section of History 105 may be taken.
    2. Of the nine courses, at least two must be seminar courses at the 300 level.
    3. Of the nine courses, at least two must be seminar courses at the 400 level.
    4. Of the nine courses taken at all levels, at least one must be taken in five of the six areas listed below:
      1. History of Asia
      2. History of Europe
      3. Global/Comparative History
      4. History of Latin America
      5. History of North Africa/Middle East
      6. History of the United States  
    5. Of the nine courses taken at all levels, at least one must concentrate in the period prior to 1500 CE. The following courses meet that requirement: History 211, 212, 213, 222, 282, 293, 311, 312, 313, 315, 375, 413, and 415. (There may be special topics as well.)
    6. Humanities 201 (History Track) counts as a 200-level history course, although it does not fulfill one of the area requirements listed above.

Credit earned through AP or IB does not fulfill the requirements of the major or minor but does count toward the 128 credits required for graduation.

Requirements for a major in History with a concentration in Public History

A total of 11-14 courses (44-56 credits) as follows:

  1. History 300 (The Historian’s Craft)
  2. History 485 (Senior Seminar)
  3. Nine (9) additional courses at the 100, 200, 300, and 400 levels, selected according to the following principles:
    1. Of the nine courses, no more than one section of History 105 may be taken.
    2. Of the nine courses, at least two must be seminar courses at the 300 level.
    3. Of the nine courses, at least two must be seminar courses at the 400 level.
    4. Of the nine courses taken at all levels, at least one must be taken in five of the six areas listed below:
      1. History of Asia
      2. History of Europe
      3. Global/Comparative History
      4. History of Latin America
      5. History of North Africa/Middle East
      6. History of the United States  
    5. Of the nine courses taken at all levels, at least one must concentrate in the period prior to 1500 CE. The following courses meet that requirement: History 211, 212, 213, 222, 282, 293, 311, 312, 313, 315, 375, 413, and 415. (There may be special topics as well.)
    6. Humanities 201 (History Track) counts as a 200-level history course, although it does not fulfill one of the area requirements listed above.
    7. History 360. Public History/Internship
    8. At least one of the following courses:
      1. History 260. Topics in Public History and Memory
      2. History 463. Public History Practicum
      3. History 490. Directed Research (topic relating to public history)
      4. Interdepartmental 225. Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
    9. At least one of the following experiences:
      1. Archaeology 120 or 450. Archaeological Field School
      2. History 461. Internship (at a public history site)
      3. Archival Studies Fellowship (F11)
      4. Shelby Foote Fellowship

Credit earned through AP or IB does not fulfill the requirements of the major or minor but does count toward the 128 credits required for graduation.

Requirements for a Minor in History

A total of 5 courses (20 credits) selected according to the following principles:

  1. No more than one section of History 105 may be taken.
  2. At least two courses at the 300 or 400 level.
  3. At least one course in each of three of the following areas:
    1. History of Asia
    2. History of Europe
    3. Global/Comparative History
    4. History of Latin America
    5. History of North Africa/Middle East
    6. History of the United States
  4. Humanities 201 (History Track) counts as a 200-level history course, although it does not fulfill the area requirements listed above.

Credit earned through AP or IB does not fulfill the requirements of the major or minor but does count toward the 128 credits required for graduation.

Interdisciplinary Study

Africana Studies

The Mission of the Africana Studies Program is to understand and appreciate the integral yet distinct experiences of people of African heritage throughout the world. The Program’s curriculum aims to emphasize diasporic connections to Africa, the Caribbean and North America in an effort to enrich our understanding and appreciation of our complex and diverse world. As such, the Program encourages students to seek appropriate ways to integrate content and analysis in this broad subject matter with their work in other disciplines and programs. 

Africana Studies: Program Committee

Charles McKinney, Department of History, Chair

Ernest Gibson, Department of English

Charles Hughes, Director, Memphis Center

Evelyn Perry, Department of Anthropology and Sociology

Zandria Robinson, Department of Anthropology and Sociology

Requirements for a Minor in Africana Studies

A total of twenty-four (24) credits as follows:

  1. Africana Studies 105 (Introduction to Africana Studies)
  2. Africana Studies 305 (Africana Theory)
  3. Either History 242 (African American History) or English 224 (African American Literature)
  4. International Studies 251 (Government and Politics of Africa)
  5. Two (2) approved Africana Studies Electives

Archaeology

Archaeology at Rhodes involves ground-level, empirical techniques such as survey and excavation to recover material remains, as well as the application of scientific and statistical methods to the study of material culture.

Archaeology: Program Committee

Miriam Clinton, Department of Art and Art History
Dee Garceau, Department of History
Kimberly Kasper, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
Susan Kus, Department of Anthropology and Sociology, Chair of the Archaeology Program
Jeanne Lopiparo, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
Milton Moreland, Department of Religious Studies
Kenny Morrell, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
Jon Russ, Department of Chemistry
Susan Satterfield, Department of Greek and Roman Studies

 

Requirements for a Minor in Archaeology

A total of twenty-four (24) credits as follows:

  1. Archaeology 210 or Anthropology 290: Learning from Things: Material Culture Studies.
  2. Archaeology 220 or Anthropology 254: Archaeological Methods or Art 220 Classical Archaeology
  3. Three courses that deal with archaeological issues offered in various departments. At least two departments must be represented to satisfy this requirement. A list of current courses is available each semester. The following courses are representative offerings that satisfy this requirement.
    • Anthropology/Sociology 202: Understanding the Past: Archaeological Perspectives on Culture
    • Anthropology/Sociology 207: Archaeology of Sex and Gender
    • Anthropology/Sociology 221: North of the Rio Grande: Indigenous People of North America
    • Anthropology/Sociology 224: Latin America before 1492
    • Anthropology/Sociology 265: Selected Introductory Topics in Anthropology and Sociology (when subject matter pertains to Archaeology)
    • Anthropology/Sociology 271: Ecological Anthropology
    • Anthropology/Sociology 275: Food and Culture
    • Anthropology/Sociology 325: The Maya and Their World
    • Anthropology/Sociology 327: Gender and Power in Latin America
    • Art 209: Art and Architecture of the Ancient Near East
    • Art 218: Greek Art and Architecture
    • Art 219: Roman Art and Architecture
    • Art 265: Topics in Art (when subject matter pertains to Archaeology)
      Art 353: Art and Life in Pompeii
    • Chemistry 107: Chemistry and Archaeology
    • Greek and Roman Studies 361: GIS and Mediterranean Archaeology
    • Religious Studies 260: Archaeology and the Biblical World
    • Religious Studies 276-277: Selected Topics in Hebrew/Bible/Old Testament (when subject matter pertains to Archaeology)
    • Religious Studies 285-286: Selected Topics in New Testament (when subject matter pertains to Archaeology)
  4. A choice of one course from the following three options.
    • Archaeology 120: Field Research in Environmental Archaeology
    • Archaeology 450: Archaeological Field School
    • Archaeology 460: Internship

Asian Studies

The political, economic, and cultural importance of the nations of Asia grows every year and the Asian Studies Program promotes the understanding of Asia’s historical, cultural, political, and economic role in the world. 

Asian Studies: Program Committee

Chien-Kai Chen, Department of International Studies
Michael R. Drompp, Department of History
Li Han, Department of Modern Languages and Literature
John C. Kaltner, Department of Religious Studies
Seok-Won Lee, Department of History
David Mason, Department of Theatre, Chair
Mark W. Muesse, Department of Religious Studies
John E. Murray, Department of Economics
Chia-rong Wu, Department of Modern Languages and Literature
Lynn B. Zastoupil, Department of History

Requirements for a Minor in Asian Studies

A total of twenty (20) credits as follows:

  1. One "Primary" Asian Studies course.
  2. One "Secondary" Asian Studies course offered by a department other than that which provided the course that fulfilled the "Primary" requirement.
  3. Three additional, 200+ level, approved Asian Studies courses.

"Primary" Asian Studies Courses
History 105: Revolutions and Revolutionaries in Modern East Asia
History 105: World War II in Asia
History 105: The Mongol World Empire
History 105: The Two Koreas, Past and Present

Art 165: Survey of Asian Art

Chinese 206: Introduction to East Asian Cultures
Chinese 214: Introduction to Chinese Culture
Chinese 216: Asian Urbanization Through Cinema*

History 282: Traditional China
History 283: Modern China
History 287: Traditional Japan
History 293: Ancient and Medieval India

International Studies 261: Government and Politics of China
International Studies 263: Comparative Political Economy of East Asia

Religious Studies 255: Religions of Asia
Religious Studies 258/Philosophy 250: Asian Philosophies


"Secondary" Asian Studies Courses
Chinese 205: Modern Chinese Literature in Translation
Chinese 215: Gender in Chinese Literature
Chinese 220: Contemporary Chinese Cinema

History 205: The Vietnam Wars
History 282: Traditional China
History 283: Modern China
History 287: Traditional Japan
History 288: Japan Since 1800
History 293: Ancient and Medieval India
History 294: Modern India

International Studies 262: China’s Foreign Policy
International Studies 263: Comparative Political Economy of East Asia
International Studies 264: China-Taiwan-US Relations

Religious Studies 255: Religious Traditions of India
Religious Studies 255: Religions of Asia
Religious Studies 258: Buddhism, Up to Now
Religious Studies 258/PHIL 250: Asian Philosophies
Religious Studies 258: Spirituality West and East


Additional Asian Studies Courses
History 385: Nomads of Inner Asia
History 391: Gandhi
History 481: Cold War in East Asia

Theatre 360: Theatre In India

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (BMB) is an interdisciplinary major that allows students to study life at the molecular level under the guidance of faculty drawn from the departments of Biology, Chemistry, and Mathematics & Computer Science.

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology: Program Committee

Terry Hill, Department of Biology
Loretta Jackson-Hayes, Department of Chemistry
Mary Miller, Department of Biology, Chair
Larryn Peterson, Department of Chemistry

Honors in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

  1. Courses required: those listed for the B. S. degree in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology as well as the Honors Tutorial (BMB 495 and BMB 496).
  2. Permission of the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Program Committee.
  3. An original investigation of some problem in the area of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. This project is usually related to work being carried out by members of the faculty affiliated with the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Major. The project may also be carried out off campus, with the careful guidance of a BMB faculty member liaison for the project.
  4. A credible thesis must be presented at the end of the project. The honors project and thesis must be approved by the student’s honors committee, which should be comprised of at least three members of the faculty, two affiliated with the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Major, and one from outside of the program.

Requirements for a Major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Leading to the B.S. Degree

Courses required for the BMB major that are appropriate for the fall semester of the first year include Chemistry 120-120L and Biology 130-131L. Students considering taking both Chemistry 120-120L and Biology 130-131L in the fall semester of the first year should consult a BMB advisor.

A total of fifty-eight to sixty-four (58-64) credits as follows:

  1. Chemistry 120-125L (Foundations in Chemistry), 211, 212-212L (Organic Chemistry with laboratory), and 240-240L (Analytical Chemistry with laboratory)
  2. Biology 130-131L (Biology I with laboratory) and Biology 140-141L (Biology II with laboratory)
  3. Biology 325-325L (Molecular Biology with laboratory)
  4. Biology 307 (Cell Biology)
  5. Chemistry 414 (Biochemistry)
  6. BMB 310 (Methods in Biochemistry and Cell Biology)
  7. BMB 485 or 486 (Senior Seminar)
  8. Any one of the following: Computer Science 141 (Programming Fundamentals) OR Math 121 (Calculus I) OR one course in probability and statistics. Courses that would be appropriate in the area of probability and statistics include Math 111, Math 211, Psychology 211, Economics 290.​
  9. Two of the following courses; at least one must have a laboratory:

             a. Elective Courses with Laboratory

                       Biology 204-204L (Mechanisms of Development with laboratory)

                       Biology 301-301L (Microbiology with laboratory)

                       Biology 304-304L (Genetics with laboratory)

                       Chemistry 406 (Instrumental Analysis)

                       BMB 451 or 452 (Research with affiliated faculty - 4 credits only may satisfy one elective; must be approved by the BMB committee)

             b. Elective Courses without a Laboratory

                        Biology 330 (Virology/Immunology)

                        Biology 376 (Molecular Neuroscience)

                        Biology 380 (Topics in Biomedical Science)

                        Chemistry 311 (Physical Chemistry)

                        Chemistry 416 (Mechanisms of Drug Action)

 

 

For students seeking admission to graduate school, the following courses are recommended:

  • BMB 451 or 452
  • Chemistry 312-312L for programs in biochemistry.
  • Mathematics 121, 122
  • Physics 111-111L, 112-112L

For students seeking admission to programs in the health professions, please visit the Health Professions Website: http://www.rhodes.edu/academics/3981.asp.

Of the following courses no more than one may be transferred into Rhodes from another institution to satisfy the requirements for the BMB major: Cell Biology, Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Methods in Biochemistry and Cell Biology.

No more than one of the two courses listed in item #9  above may be transferred into Rhodes from another institution to satisfy the requirements for the BMB major.

Students seeking a double major must have at least four courses listed in items #3 through #9 for the BMB major that are not used to satisfy requirements for the other major.

Environmental Studies and Sciences

The Environmental Studies & Sciences Program at Rhodes offers an innovative curriculum that allows students to combine study in social sciences, humanities, natural sciences, and fine arts.

 

Environmental Studies and Sciences: Program Committee

Erin Bodine, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science
Sarah Boyle, Department of Biology, Chair
Michael Collins, Department of Biology
Tara Massad, Department of Biology
Kimberly Kasper, Department of Anthropology/Sociology
Tait Keller, Department of History
William Eckenhoff, Department of Chemistry
Jennifer Dabbs Sciubba, Department of International Studies
Rebecca Tuvel, Department of Philosophy

Policy on Advanced Placement Credit

Students who have received a 5 on the Advanced Placement Environmental Science examination may count that credit as one introductory Environmental Sciences elective course in the Environmental Studies and Sciences majors and minors.

Requirements for a Major in Environmental Sciences

A total of fifty four to fifty six (54-56) hours and one additional environmental experience as follows:

  1. Four Introductory Courses:
    1. ENVS 150: Environment and Society.
    2. Three introductory courses from the following list:
      1. BIOL 120: Environmental Science.
      2. CHEM 120: Foundations of Chemistry. (environmentally-themed section preferred)
      3. ENVS 111: Physical Geology.
      4. ENVS 116: Introductory Topics in Earth Science.
      5. ENVS 120: Introduction to Earth and Atmospheric Science.
      6. ENVS 170: Rocky Mountain Field Research. (at Teton Science Schools)
      7. MATH 214: Discrete Mathematical Modeling with Biological Applications.
  2. One statistics course from the following list:
    1. ECON 290: Statistical Analysis for Economics and Business.
    2. MATH 111: Introduction to Applied Statistics.
    3. MATH 211: Statistical Methods and Their Applications
    4. PSYC 211: Statistical Methods.
  3. Four upper-level Environmental Sciences electives. Three courses must contain a lab component. Courses must come from at least two departments. Additional courses may be designated by the Environmental Studies and Sciences program.
    1. Prerequisites: ENVS 111 or BIOL 120 or CHEM 120
      1. ENVS 211(L): Geomorphology.
    2. Prerequisites: BIOL 120 or ENVS 120 and CHEM 120
      1. ENVS 206(L): Topics in Environmental Sciences. (when approved by the director of the program)
      2. ENVS 220(L): Physical Geography of the Southern United States.
    3. Prerequisites: BIOL 120 and CHEM 120 or BIOL 130-131 and 140-141
      1. BIOL 212: Environmental Issues in Southern Africa.
      2. BIOL 315(L): Ecology.
      3. BIOL 320(L): Conservation Biology.
      4. BIOL 345(L): Ornithology.
      5. BIOL 365: Advanced Topics in Biology. (i.e. Plants and People, or other environmentally-related topic approved by the director of the program)
    4. Prerequisites: BIOL 120, CHEM 120, and Math or Statistics
      1.       ENVS 260: Aquatic Ecosystem Analysis. (Semester in Environmental Science Program)
      2.       ENVS 270: Terrestrial Ecosystem Analysis. (Semester in Environmental Science Program)
    5. Prerequisites: BIOL 130-131 and 140-141
      1. BIOL 200(L): Evolution.
      2. BIOL 201(L): Mycology.
      3. BIOL 202: Vertebrate Life.
      4. BIOL 207(L): Animal Behavior.
      5. BIOL 253(L): Plant Genetics and Diversity.
      6. BIOL 301(L): Microbiology.
      7. BIOL 365(L): Advanced Topics in Biology. (i.e. Vertebrate Biology, or other environmentally-related topic approved by the director of the program)
    6. Prerequisite: Chemistry 120
      1. CHEM 206: Environmental Chemistry.
      2. CHEM 211: Organic Chemistry I.
    7. Prerequisite: Chemistry 211
      1. CHEM 240(L): Analytical Chemistry.
    8. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
      1. ENVS 451-452: Research.
      2. ENVS 495-496: Honors Tutorial.
  4. Two Environmental Studies electives from the following list:
    1. ANSO 201: Human Evolution.
    2. ANSO 221: North of the Rio: Indiginous People of North America.
    3. ANSO 265: Selected Introductory Topics in Anthropology and Sociology. (i.e. Southern Foodscapes, or other environmentally-related topic approved by the director of the program)
    4. ANSO 271: Ecological Anthropology.
    5. ANSO 273: Gender and the Environment.
    6. ANSO 275: Food and Culture: You Are What You Eat.
    7. ART 166: Topics in Studio Art: Sculpture, Trees, and the Life of Wood.
    8. ART 265: Urban Design.
      CHIN 216: Asian Urbanization through Cinema.
    9. ECON 100: Introduction to Economics
    10. ECON 349: Environmental and Natural Resource Economics.
    11. ECON 360: Urban Economics.
    12. ENGL 332: Advanced Shakespeare Studies: Green Shakespeare.
    13. ENGL 336: Literature & Landscape.
    14. ENVS 205: Topics in Environmental Studies. (when approved by the director of the program)
    15. FYWS 151: Overton: Memphis and the History of Urban Parks.
    16. HIST 105: Disease & Epidemics.
    17. HIST 105: Human Reproduction
    18. HIST 105: City/Technology/Environment
    19. HIST 207: Global Environmental History.
    20. HIST 307: Nature and War.
    21. HIST 309: Natural Disasters.
    22. HUM 201: Search for Values. (Jackson’s or Bakewell's section only)
    23. INTS 220: Global Ecopolitics.
    24. INTS 221: Population and National Security.
    25. INTS 340: The Politics of Migration.
    26. INTS 341: Comparative Ecopolitics.
    27. PHIL 230: Environmental Philosophy.
    28. POLS 206: Urban Politics and Policy.
    29. RELS 220: Topics in Theology: Environmental Theology.
    30. URBN 201: Introduction to Urban Studies.
    31. URBN 235: Principles of Public Health
  5. INTD 225: Geographic Information Systems.
  6. ENVS 486: Senior Seminar.
  7. Experiential Learning. Each student in the major will be required to complete an environmentally-oriented experience in which he or she will have a substantial engagement with environmental issues outside the Rhodes campus. There are several ways to complete this requirement, some of which are credit-bearing, but others are not. As with the College’s F11 requirement, students are not required to receive academic credit. The experiential learning component may be fulfilled by a course that counts as one of the electives for the major.
    1. Students may enroll in one of the following:
      1. ARCE 120: Field Research in Environmental Archaeology.
      2. ARCE 450: Archaeological Field School.
      3. BIOL 214: Environmental Field Study in Namibia.
      4. ENVS 160: Rocky Mountain Ecology (at Teton Science Schools).
      5. ENVS 170: Rocky Mountain Field Research (at Teton Science Schools).
        ENVS 405: Independent Research Project. (Semester in Environmental Science Program)
      6. ENVS 451-452: Research.
      7. ENVS 460: Internship in Environmental Studies and Sciences.
      8. ENVS 495-496: Honors Tutorial.
    2. Experiences other than those listed above must be approved by the director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences Program and will require a substantial essay, evaluated by the director of the program, which links the student’s experience with what he or she has learned in the classroom. Experiences may include organized service projects at Rhodes with faculty or staff oversight (such as the Summer Service Fellowships), or study abroad experiences approved by Rhodes with significant environmental content as determined by the director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences program.

Requirements for a Major in Environmental Studies

A total of fifty-two (52) credits and one additional environmental experience as follows:

  1. Four Introductory Courses:
    1. ENVS 150: Environment and Society.
    2. Two introductory Environmental Studies courses from the following list (these two courses may not also be used to fulfill Environmental Studies electives):
      1. ANSO 201: Human Evolution.
      2. HIST 207: Global Environmental History.
      3. INTS 220: Global Ecopolitics.
      4. PHIL 230: Environmental Philosophy.
    3. One introductory Environmental Sciences course from the following list (this course may not also be used to fulfill Environmental Sciences elective):
      1. BIOL 120: Introduction to Environmental Science.
      2. ENVS 111: Physical Geology.
      3. ENVS 116: Introductory Topics in Earth Science.
      4. ENVS 120: Introduction to Earth and Atmospheric Science.
      5. ENVS 170: Rocky Mountain Ecology Field Research. (at Teton Science Schools)
  2. ECON 100: Introduction to Economics.
  3. Four Environmental Studies electives from the following list; courses must come from at least two departments; additional courses may be designated by the Environmental Studies and Sciences program:
    1. ANSO 201: Human Evolution.
    2. ANSO 221: North of the Rio: Indigenous People of North America.
    3. ANSO 265: Selected Introductory Topics in Anthropology and Sociology. (i.e. Southern Foodscapes, or other environmentally-related topic approved by the director of the program)
    4. ANSO 271: Ecological Anthropology.
    5. ANSO 273: Gender and the Environment.
    6. ANSO 275: Food and Culture: You Are What You Eat.
    7. ART 166: Topics in Studio Art: Sculpture, Trees, and the Life of Wood.
    8. ART 265: Urban Design.
    9. CHIN 214: Intro to Chinese Culture: Material Culture and Chinese Gardens.
    10. ECON 349: Environmental and Natural Resource Economics.
    11. ECON 360: Urban Economics.
    12. ENGL 332: Advanced Shakespeare Studies: Green Shakespeare.
    13. ENGL 336: Literature & Landscape.
    14. ENVS 205: Topics in Environmental Studies. (when approved by the director of the program)
    15. ENVS 451-452: Research.
    16. ENVS 495-496: Honors Tutorial.
    17. FYWS 151: Overton: Memphis and the History of Urban Parks.
    18. HIST 105: Disease & Epidemics.
    19. HIST 105: Human Reproduction.
    20. HIST 105: City/Technology/Environment
    21. HIST 207: Global Environmental History.
    22. HIST 307: Nature and War.
    23. HIST 309: Natural Disasters.
    24. HUM 201: Search for Values. (Jackson’s or Bakewell's section only)
    25. INTS 220: Global Ecopolitics.
    26. INTS 221: Population and National Security.
    27. INTS 340: The Politics of Migration.
    28. INTS 341: Comparative Ecopolitics.
    29. PHIL 230: Environmental Philosophy.
    30. POLS 206: Urban Politics and Policy.
    31. RELS 220: Topics in Theology: Environmental Theology.
    32. URBN 201: Introduction to Urban Studies.
    33. URBN 235: Principles of Public Health
  4. Two additional Environmental Sciences courses from the following list; additional courses may be designated by the Environmental Studies and Sciences program:
    1. No Prerequisites
      1. BIOL 120: Introduction to Environmental Science.
      2. CHEM 120(L): Foundations of Chemistry. (Environmentally-themed section preferred)
      3. ENVS 111: Physical Geology.
      4. ENVS 116: Introductory Topics in Earth Science.
      5. ENVS 120: Introduction to Earth and Atmospheric Science.
      6. ENVS 170: Rocky Mountain Ecology Field Research. (at Teton Science Schools)
      7. MATH 115: Applied Calculus or a statistics course (ECON 290 or MATH 111 or MATH 211 or PSYC 211) or COMP 141: Computer Science I.
      8. MATH 214: Discrete Mathematical Modeling with Biological Applications.
    2. Prerequisites: ENVS 111 or BIOL 120 or CHEM 120
      1. ENVS 211(L): Geomorphology.
    3. Prerequisites: BIOL 120 or ENVS 120 and CHEM 120
      1. ENVS 206(L): Topics in Environmental Sciences. (when approved by the director of the program)
      2. ENVS 220(L): Physical Geography of the Southeastern United States.
    4. Prerequisites: BIOL 120 and CHEM 120 or BIOL 130-131 and 140-141
      1. BIOL 212 : Environmental Issues in Southern Africa.
      2. BIOL 315(L): Ecology.
      3. BIOL 320(L): Conservation Biology.
      4. BIOL 345(L): Ornithology.
      5. BIOL 365: Advanced Topics in Biology. (i.e. Plants and People, or other environmentally-related topic approved by the director of the program)
    5. Prerequisites: BIOL 130-131 and 140-141
      1. BIOL 200(L): Evolution.
      2. BIOL 201(L): Mycology.
      3. BIOL 202: Vertebrate Life.
      4. BIOL 207(L): Animal Behavior.
      5. BIOL 253(L): Plant Genetics and Diversity.
      6. BIOL 301(L): Microbiology.
      7. BIOL 365(L): Advanced Topics in Biology. (i.e. Vertebrate Biology, or other environmentally-related topic approved by the director of the program)
    6. Prerequisite: Chemistry 120
      1. CHEM 206: Environmental Chemistry.
      2. CHEM 211: Organic Chemistry I.
    7. Prerequisite: Chemistry 211
      1. CHEM 240(L): Analytical Chemistry.
  5. INTD 225: Geographic Information Systems.
  6. ENVS 486: Senior Seminar.
  7. Experiential Learning. Each student in the major will be required to complete an environmentally-oriented experience in which he or she will have a substantial engagement with environmental issues outside the Rhodes campus. There are several ways to complete this requirement, some of which are credit-bearing, but others are not. As with the College’s F11 requirement, students are not required to receive academic credit. The experiential learning component may be fulfilled by a course that counts as one of the electives for the major.
    1. Students may enroll in one of the following:
      • ARCE 120: Field Research in Environmental Archaeology.
      • ARCE 450: Archaeological Field School.
      • BIOL 214: Environmental Field Study in Namibia.
      • ENVS 160: Rocky Mountain Ecology. (at Teton Science Schools)
      • ENVS 170: Rocky Mountain Ecology Field Research. (at Teton Science Schools)
      • ENVS 451-452: Research.
      • ENVS 460: Internship in Environmental Studies and Sciences.
      • ENVS 495-496: Honor's Tutorial.
    2. Experiences other than those listed above must be approved by the director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences Program and will require a substantial essay, evaluated by the director of the program, which links the student’s experience with what he or she has learned in the classroom. Experiences may include organized service projects at Rhodes with faculty or staff oversight (such as the Summer Service Fellowships), or study abroad experiences approved by Rhodes with significant environmental content as determined by the director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences program. Students should submit the form on the program’s website to petition for such experiences.

Requirements for a Minor in Environmental Sciences

A total of twenty-four to twenty-seven (24-27) credits and one environmental experience as follows:

  1. ENVS 150: Environment and Society.
  2. One of the following introductory courses in Environmental Sciences:
    1. BIOL 120: Environmental Science.
    2. CHEM 120(L): Foundations of Chemistry.
    3. ENVS 111: Physical Geology.
    4. ENVS 116: Introductory Topics in Earth Science.
    5. ENVS 120: Introduction to Earth and Atmospheric Science.
    6. MATH 115: Applied Calculus.
    7. MATH 214: Discrete Mathematical Modeling with Biological Applications.
  3. Three of the following Environmental Sciences courses from the following list. At least one must be taken from outside student’s major department. Additional courses may be designated by the Environmental Studies and Sciences program.
    1. No Prerequisites
      1. BIOL 120: Introduction to Environmental Science.
      2. CHEM 120(L): Foundations of Chemistry. (Environmentally-themed section preferred)
      3. ENVS 111: Physical Geology.
      4. ENVS 116: Introductory Topics in Earth Science.
      5. ENVS 120: Introduction to Earth and Atmospheric Science.
      6. ENVS 170: Rocky Mountain Ecology Field Research. (at Teton Science Schools)
      7. INTD 225: Geographic Information Systems
      8. MATH 115: Applied Calculus.
      9. MATH 214: Discrete Mathematical Modeling with Biological Applications.
    2. Prerequisites: ENVS 111 or BIOL 120 or CHEM 120
      1. ENVS 211(L): Geomorphology
    3. Prerequisites: BIOL 120 or ENVS 120 and CHEM 120
      1. ENVS 206(L): Topics in Environmental Sciences. (when approved by the director of the program)
      2. ENVS 220(L): Physical Geography of the Southeastern United States.
    4. Prerequisites: BIOL 120 and CHEM 120 or BIOL 130-131 and 140-141
      1. BIOL 212: Environmental Issues in Southern Africa.
      2. BIOL 315(L): Ecology.
      3. BIOL 320(L): Conservation Biology.
      4. BIOL 345(L): Ornithology.
      5. BIOL 365: Advanced Topics in Biology. (i.e. Plants and People, or other environmentally-related topic approved by the director of the program)
    5. Prerequisites: BIOL 130-131 and 140-141
      1. BIOL 200(L): Evolution.
      2. BIOL 201(L): Mycology.
      3. BIOL 202: Vertebrate Life.
      4. BIOL 207(L): Animal Behavior.
      5. BIOL 253(L): Plant Genetics and Diversity.
      6. BIOL 301(L): Microbiology.Prerequisite: Chemistry 120
      7. BIOL 365(L): Advanced Topics in Biology. (i.e. Vertebrate Biology, or other environmentally-related topic approved by the director of the program)
    6. Prerequisites: BIOL 120, CHEM 120, and Math or Statistics

            ENVS 260: Aquatic Ecosystem Analysis. (Semester in Environmental Science Program)
            ENVS 270: Terrestrial Ecosystem Analysis. (Semester in Environmental Science Program)

      Prerequisite: Chemistry 120
      1. CHEM 206: Environmental Chemistry.
      2. CHEM 211: Organic Chemistry I.
    7. Prerequisite: Chemistry 211
      1. CHEM 240(L): Analytical Chemistry.
  4. One additional Environmental Studies elective from the following list. Additional courses may be designated by the Environmental Studies and Sciences program.
    1. ANSO 201: Human Evolution.
    2. ANSO 221: North of the Rio: Indigenous People of North America.
    3. ANSO 265: Selected Introductory Topics in Anthropology and Sociology. (i.e. Southern Foodscapes, or other environmentally- related topic approved by the director of the program)
    4. ANSO 271: Ecological Anthropology.
    5. ANSO 273: Gender and the Environment.
    6. ANSO 275: Food and Culture: You Are What You Eat.
    7. ART 166: Topics in Studio Art: Sculpture, Trees, and the Life of Wood.
    8. ART 265: Urban Design.
    9. CHIN 214: Intro to Chinese Culture: Material Culture and Chinese Gardens.
    10. ECON 100: Intro to Economics
    11. ECON 349: Environmental and Natural Resource Economics.
    12. ECON 360: Urban Economics.
    13. ENGL 332: Advanced Shakespeare Studies: Green Shakespeare.
    14. ENGL 336: Literature & Landscape.
    15. ENVS 205: Topics in Environmental Studies. (when approved by the director of the program)
    16. FYWS 151: Overton: Memphis and the History of Urban Parks.
    17. HIST 105: Disease & Epidemics.
    18. HIST 105: Human Reproduction.
    19. HIST 105: City/Technology/Environment.
    20. HIST 207: Global Environmental History.
    21. HIST 307: Nature and War.
    22. HIST 309: Natural Disasters.
    23. HUM 201: Search for Values. (Jackson’s or Bakewell's section only)
    24. INTS 220: Global Ecopolitics.
    25. INTS 221: Population and National Security.
    26. INTS 340: The Politics of Migration.
    27. INTS 341: Comparative Ecopolitics.
    28. PHIL 230: Environmental Philosophy.
    29. POLS 206: Urban Politics and Policy.
    30. RELS 220: Topics in Theology: Environmental Theology.
    31. URBN 201: Introduction to Urban Studies.
    32. URBN 235: Principles of Public Health.
  5. Experiential Learning. Each student in the minor will be required to complete an environmentally-oriented experience in which he or she will have a substantial engagement with environmental issues outside the Rhodes campus. There are several ways to complete this requirement, some of which are credit-bearing, but others are not. As with the College’s F11 requirement, students are not required to receive academic credit. The experiential learning component may be fulfilled by a course that counts as one of the electives for the major.
    1. Students may enroll in one of the following:
      1. ARCE 120: Field Research in Environmental Archaeology.
      2. BIOL 214: Environmental Field Study in Namibia.
      3. ARCE 450: Archaeological Field School.
      4. ENVS 160: Rocky Mountain Ecology. (at Teton Science Schools)
      5. ENVS 170: Rocky Mountain Field Research. (at Teton Science Schools)
      6. ENVS 451-452: Research.
      7. ENVS 460: Internship in Environmental Studies and Sciences.
    2. Experiences other than those listed above must be approved by the director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences Program and will require a substantial essay, evaluated by the director of the program, which links the student’s experience with what he or she has learned in the classroom. Experiences may include organized service projects at Rhodes with faculty or staff oversight (such as the Summer Service Fellowships), or study abroad experiences approved by Rhodes with significant environmental content as determined by the director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences program.

N.B.: Although not required, COMP 141: Computer Science I, is strongly recommended.

Requirements for a Minor in Environmental Studies

A total of twenty-four to twenty-five (24-25) credits and one additional experiential environmental experience as follows:

  1. ENVS 150: Environment and Society.
  2. One introductory course from the following:
    1. ANSO 201: Human Evolution.
    2. HIST 207: Global Environmental History.
    3. INTS 220: Global Ecopolitics.
    4. PHIL 230: Environmental Philosophy.
  3. Three of the following Environmental Studies courses from at least two departments. Additional courses may be designated by the Environmental Studies and Sciences program.
    1. ANSO 201: Human Evolution.
    2. ANSO 221: North of the Rio: Indigenous People of North America.
    3. ANSO 265: Selected Introductory Topics in Anthropology and Sociology. (i.e. Southern Foodscapes, or other environmentally-related topic approved by the director of the program)
    4. ANSO 271: Ecological Anthropology.
    5. ANSO 273: Gender and the Environment.
    6. ANSO 275: Food and Culture: You Are What You Eat.
    7. ART 166: Topics in Studio Art: Sculpture, Trees, and the Life of Wood.
    8. ART 265: Urban Design.
    9. CHIN 214: Intro to Chinese Culture: Material Culture and Chinese Gardens.
    10. ECON 100: Intro to Economics
    11. ECON 349: Environmental and Natural Resource Economics.
    12. ECON 360: Urban Economics.
    13. ENGL 332: Advanced Shakespeare Studies: Green Shakespeare.
    14. ENGL 336: Literature & Landscape.
    15. ENVS 205: Topics in Environmental Studies. (when approved by the director of the program)
    16. FYWS 151: Overton: Memphis and the History of Urban Parks.
    17. HIST 105: Disease & Epidemics.
    18. HIST 105: Human Reproduction.
    19. HIST 105: Technology/Cities/Environment
    20. HIST 207: Global Environmental History.
    21. HIST 307: Nature and War.
    22. HIST 309: Natural Disasters.
    23. HUM 201: Search for Values. (Jackson’s or Bakewell's section only)
    24. INTS 220: Global Ecopolitics.
    25. INTS 221: Population and National Security.
    26. INTS 340: The Politics of Migration.
    27. INTS 341: Comparative Ecopolitics.
    28. PHIL 230: Environmental Philosophy.
    29. POLS 206: Urban Politics and Policy.
    30. RELS 220: Topics in Theology: Environmental Theology.
    31. URBN 201: Introduction to Urban Studies.
    32. URBN 235: Principles of Public Health.
  4. One Environmental Sciences course from the following list. Additional courses may be designated by the Environmental Studies and Sciences program.
    1. No Prerequisites
      1. BIOL 120: Introduction to Environmental Science.
      2. CHEM 120(L): Foundations of Chemistry. (Environmentally-themed section preferred)
      3. ENVS 111: Physical Geology.
      4. ENVS 116: Introductory Topics in Earth Science.
      5. ENVS 120: Introduction to Earth and Atmospheric Science.
      6. ENVS 170: Rocky Mountain Ecology Field Research. (at Teton Science Schools)
      7. INTD 225: Geographic Information Systems.
      8. MATH 115: Applied Calculus or COMP 141: Computer Science I or a statistics course (ECON 290, MATH 111 or PSYC 211).
      9. MATH 214: Discrete Mathematical Modeling with Biological Applications.
    2. Prerequisites: ENVS 111
      1. ENVS 211(L): Geomorphology
    3. Prerequisites: BIOL 120 or ENVS 120 and CHEM 120
      1. ENVS 206(L): Topics in Environmental Sciences. (when approved by the director of the program)
      2. ENVS 220(L): Physical Geography of the Southeastern United States.
    4. Prerequisites: BIOL 120 and CHEM 120 or BIOL 130-131 and 140-141
      1. BIOL 212: Environmental Issues in Southern Africa.
      2. BIOL 315(L): Ecology.
      3. BIOL 320(L): Conservation Biology.
      4. BIOL 345(L): Ornithology.
      5. BIOL 365: Advanced Topics in Biology. (i.e. Plants and People, or other environmentally-related topic approved by the director of the program)
    5. Prerequisites: BIOL 130-131 and 140-141
      1. BIOL 200(L): Evolution.
      2. BIOL 201(L): Mycology.
      3. BIOL 202: Vertebrate Life.
      4. BIOL 207(L): Animal Behavior.
      5. BIOL 253(L): Plant Genetics and Diversity.
      6. BIOL 301(L): Microbiology.
    6. Prerequisite: Chemistry 120
      1. CHEM 206: Environmental Chemistry.
      2. CHEM 211: Organic Chemistry I.
    7. Prerequisite: Chemistry 211
      1. CHEM 240(L): Analytical Chemistry.
  5. Experiential Learning. Each student in the minor will be required to complete an environmentally-oriented experience in which he or she will have a substantial engagement with environmental issues outside the Rhodes campus. There are several ways to complete this requirement, some of which are credit-bearing, but others are not. As with the College’s F11 requirement, students are not required to receive academic credit. The experiential learning component may be fulfilled by a course that counts as one of the electives for the major.
    1. Students may enroll in one of the following:
      1. ARCE 120: Field Research in Environmental Archaeology.
      2. ARCE 450: Archaeological Field School.
      3. BIOL 214: Environmental Field Study in Namibia.
      4. ENVS 160: Rocky Mountain Ecology. (at Teton Science Schools)
      5. ENVS 170: Rocky Mountain Field Research. (at Teton Science Schools)
      6. ENVS 451-452: Research.
      7. ENVS 460: Internship in Environmental Studies and Sciences.
    2. Experiences other than those listed above must be approved by the director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences Program and will require a substantial essay, evaluated by the director of the program, which links the student’s experience with what he or she has learned in the classroom. Experiences may include organized service projects at Rhodes with faculty or staff oversight (such as the Summer Service Fellowships), or study abroad experiences approved by Rhodes with significant environmental content as determined by the director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences program.

N.B.: Although not required, COMP 141: Computer Science I, is strongly recommended.

Film and Media Studies

Film and Media Studies at Rhodes College offers a critical understanding of the history, theory, and production of moving images. Interdisciplinary by design, Film and Media Studies draws from courses in various departments, including Art, Educational Studies, English, History, International Studies, Modern Languages and Literatures, Political Science, and Theatre.

 

Film and Media Studies: Program Committee

Rashna Richards, Department of English, Chair

Affiliated Faculty

Barron Boyd, Department of International Studies

Zachary Casey, Educational Studies Program

Joy Broke Fairfield, Department of Theatre

Darren Floyd, Department of Art and Art History

Dee Garceau, Department of History

Amy Jasperson, Department of Political Science

Michael LaRosa, Department of History

Han Li, Department of Modeern Languages and Literatures

Laura Loth, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures

David McCarthy, Department of Art

Scott Newstok, Department of English

Seth Rudy, Department of English

Lynn Zastoupil, Department of History

Nikolaos Zahariadis, Department of International Studies

 

Requirements for a Minor in Film and Media Studies

A total of twenty (20) credits as follows:

  1. English 202: Introduction to Cinema
  2. English 382: Film Theory
  3. Three courses to be chosen from a list of offerings in various departments. One of these requirements may be satisfied by a directed inquiry or an internship (on approval of the Film Minor Committee). Courses regularly offered include:
    1. Art 110: Film/Experimental Video Production
    2. Art 114: Digital Art
    3. Art 166: Animation (when topic is appropriate)
    4. Art 213: Digital Art: Intermediate Projects
    5. Art 216: 3D Animation/Virtual Realities
    6. Art 313: Digital Art: Advanced Projects
    7. Chinese 216/Urban Studies 265: Asian Urbanization through Cinema
    8. Chinese 220/320: Contemporary Chinese Cinema
    9. English 190: Shakespeare on Screen (when topic is appropriate)
    10. English 204: Introduction to Screenwriting
    11. English 241: History and Criticism of American Cinema
    12. English 242: World Film
    13. English 245: Special Topics in Film
    14. English 381: Advanced Topics in Film
    15. French 334: French and Francophone Cinema
    16. German 240/340: German Cinema
    17. History 105: British Empire through Film
    18. History 105: History of Latin America through Film
    19. History 462: Historical Documentary Filmmaking
    20. International Studies 254: South Africa through Documentary Film
    21. International Studies 256: Weapons of Mass Deception
    22. Political Science 208: Media and Politics
    23. Political Science 308: Political Advertising
      Russian 285: Putin's Russia and Media
    24. Russian 400: Russian Film
    25. Theatre 265: Dramatic Writing
    26. Theatre 265: LGBTQ Culture in Media

First-Year Writing Seminar

The First-Year Writing Seminars (FYWS) are offered by different departments across the curriculum and fulfill the first component of the F2 Requirement.

Director of College Writing: Rebecca Finlayson, Department of English

151. First-Year Writing Seminar.

Fall, Spring. Credits 4.

Degree Requirement: F2s.

A course that develops the ability to read and think critically, to employ discussion and writing as a means of exploring and refining ideas, and to express those ideas in effective prose. Individual sections of the course will explore different topics in reading, discussion, and writing. Topics are selected by individual professors and are designed to help students develop transferable skills of analysis and argumentation, applicable to the various disciplines of the liberal arts and sciences. Several papers will be required, at least one of which will involve use of the library and proper documentation. The seminar will emphasize successive stages of the writing process, including prewriting, drafting, and revision, and will provide feedback from classmates and the instructor. Students may not take both FYWS 151 and FYWS 155.

155. First-Year Writing Seminar: Daily Themes.

Fall, Spring. Credits 4.

Degree Requirement: F2s.

An alternative to FYWS 151 offered to outstanding first-year writers, by invitation from the Director of College Writing. The course is limited to 12 students who meet as a class once a week and individually with the instructor or in small groups with the Writing Fellow once a week. Students will turn in 4 one-page themes each week. Some research will be required, and students will use their daily themes as the basis for two longer papers: one at mid term and the other at the end of the semester. Students may not take both FYWS 151 and FYWS 155.

Gender and Sexuality Studies

Gender and Sexuality Studies focuses on the ways in which gender and sexuality function as part of a dynamic system that shapes identity, structures knowledge, and determines the distribution of social and political power.

Gender and Sexuality Studies: Affiliated Faculty

Elizabeth Bridges, Department of Modern Languages
Kathleen Doyle, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
Dee Garceau-Hagen, Department of History
Rhiannon Graybill, Department of Religious Studies
Judith Haas, Department of English, Chair
Li Han, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
Amy Jasperson, Department of Political Science
Kimberly Kasper, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
Mona Kreitner, Department of Music
Susan Kus, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
Jeanne Lopiparo, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
Laura Loth, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
Shira Malkin, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
Michelle Mattson, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
David McCarthy, Department of Art
Valeria Z. Nollan, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
Evie Perry, Department of Anthropology and Sociology 
Leslie Petty, Department of English
Rashna Richards, Department of English
Amy Risley, Department of International Studies
Zandria Robinson, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
Vanessa Rogers, Department of Music
Rylan Testa, Department of Psychology
Elizabeth Thomas, Department of Psychology and Urban Studies
Rebecca Tuvel, Department of Philosophy
Marsha Walton, Department of Psychology

 
 
 

Requirements for a Minor in Gender and Sexuality Studies

A total of twenty-four (24) credits as follows:

  1. Gender and Sexuality Studies 200. Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies.
  2. Gender and Sexuality Studies 400. Feminist and Queer Theory.
  3. Four courses selected from the Gender and Sexuality Studies curriculum.

Two of these courses must come from fields outside of one’s major. For one of these four courses, students are encouraged to consider an Internship or a Directed Inquiry. In order to receive academic credit for either the Internship or the Directed Inquiry, students must write a proposal, in consultation with a faculty mentor and submit the proposal for approval by the director of Gender and Sexuality Studies.

  • Gender and Sexuality Studies courses regularly offered include, but are not limited to:
  • Anthropology/Sociology 207: Women in Prehistory
  • Anthropology/Sociology 231: Gender and Society
    Anthropology/Sociology 365: Black Feminist Thought
  • English 225: Region, Race, Gender and Class in Southern Literature
  • History 445: Gender in the American West
  • International Studies 432: Women in World Politics
  • Music 105: Women in Music
  • Psychology 232: Psychology of Gender and Sexuality
    Psychology 280: Psychology of Gender and Sexualities
  • Religious Studies 301: Gender and Sexuality in the Hebrew Bible
  • Spanish 350: Short Fiction by Spanish Women Writers
 

Humanities

The Life program and the Search program described below offer alternative ways to fulfill the F1 Requirement in the College’s Foundation requirements.

Life: Then and Now

Staff:
Thomas Bremer, Department of Religious Studies
Patrick Gray, Department of Religious Studies 
Stephen R. Haynes, Department of Religious Studies
Kendra G. Hotz, Department of Religious Studies 
John C. Kaltner, Department of Religious Studies
Steven L. McKenzie, Department of Religious Studies
Bernadette McNary-Zak, Department of Religious Studies
Milton C. Moreland, Department of Religious Studies
Mark W. Muesse, Department of Religious Studies
Mark P. Newman, Department of Philosophy
Susan Satterfield, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
Patrick A. Shade, Department of Philosophy
David Sick, Department of Greek and Roman Studies

In the first two courses of the Life: Then and Now program, the student is introduced to the major methodological approaches to the study of religion represented in the “Life” curriculum. The student selects the last course from a range of courses that apply these specific methodological approaches to different aspects of religion. Fuller course descriptions may be found in the departmental listings.

101-102. Biblical Texts and Contexts: Selected Topics.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4 (per semester).

Degree Requirements: Life Then and Now, F1; F2i (RS 102 only)

This two-course sequence of selected topics enables students to develop critical knowledge of biblical texts and post-biblical traditions by helping them understand how these works and their histories of reception inform interpretive contexts. Students will acquire skills in critical thinking, analysis, reading, and writing that will equip them to recognize the relevance of the academic study of biblical texts and religion. Selected works from the biblical writings and affiliated literature will be discussed within the framework of topics that will allow students to explore their own and others’ operative assumptions about meaning and values.

Religious Studies 101-102 is a prerequisite for 200-level courses in the Religious Studies Department. Humanities 101-102 can substitute for this prerequisite.

 

Final Courses.

The concluding courses in the “Life” curriculum allow the student to focus in particular areas of the study of religion or philosophy. See the departmental listings under “Religious Studies,” “Philosophy,” and “Greek and Roman Studies” for specific courses in the Life curriculum.

The Search for Values in the Light of Western History and Religion

Staff:
Geoffrey Bakewell, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
Hannah Barker, Department of History
Rachel Bauer, Department of Modern Languages
Gordon Bigelow, Department of English
Suzanne Bonefas, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
Elizabeth Bridges, Department of Modern Languages
Daniel E. Cullen, Department of Political Science
Lori Garner, Department of English
Scott Garner, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
Kyle Grady, Department of Philosophy
Patrick Gray, Department of Religious Studies
Rhiannon Graybill, Department of Religious Studies
Judith P. Haas, Department of English
Stephen R. Haynes, Department of Religious Studies
Kendra G. Hotz, Department of Religious Studies
Timothy Huebner, Department of History
Jeffrey H. Jackson, Department of History
Joseph Jansen, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
Ryan Johnson, Department of History
Jonathan Judaken, Department of History
Ariel Lopez, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
Laura Loth, Department of Modern Languages
David Mason, Department of Theatre
Bernadette McNary-Zak, Department of Religious Studies
Milton C. Moreland, Department of Religious Studies
Kenneth S. Morrell, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
John Murray, Department of Economics
Michael Nelson, Department of Political Science
Scott Newstok, Department of English
Valeria Z. Nollan, Department of Modern Languages
Bradley Onishi, Department of Religious Studies
Leigh Pittenger, Department of Religious Studies
Vanessa Rogers, Department of Music
Susan Satterfield, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
Patrick Shade, Department of Philosophy
David H. Sick, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
Rebecca Tuvel, Department of Philosophy
Daniel Ullucci, Department of Religious Studies
Stephen H. Wirls, Department of Political Science

Humanities 101-102-201. The Search for Values in the Light of Western History and Religion.

Fall-Spring-Fall. Credits: 4-4-4.

Degree Requirements: F1.

The Search for Values in the Light of Western History and Religion is an interdisciplinary study of the ideas, beliefs, and cultural developments that have formed Western culture. The first two courses of the sequence are taken in the fall (Humanities 101) and spring (Humanities 102) semesters of the first year. In these courses, students examine original documents in translation from the history and literature of the Israelites, the Greeks, the Romans, and the early Christians. Selected texts from the Hebrew Bible are read and discussed in conjunction with the ideas and themes of Mesopotamian and Greek culture. Students study the Gospels and selected letters from the New Testament in conjunction with Hellenistic and Roman history, life, and thought.

In the third semester of the sequence, students trace the roles of biblical and classical heritages in the shaping of the values, character, and institutions of Western culture and its understanding of self and world.

To this end, they read and discuss selections from the works of philosophers, theologians, political theorists, scientists, and literary artists from the Renaissance to the present. Courses in the second year are organized by discipline or other theme. Choices include biology, classical studies, history, literature, music, philosophy, politics, religious studies, and theatre.

Prerequisites: Humanities 101 is a prerequisite for Humanities 102. Humanities 102 is a prerequisite for Humanities 201. These prerequisites may be satisfied alternatively by the permission of the instructor.

Interdisciplinary Majors

Students interested in interdisciplinary study are encouraged to consider interdisciplinary majors. The following interdisciplinary majors have been approved by the Faculty, and the required courses have been defined as listed below. Students who wish to declare any of these established interdisciplinary majors may do so by filing the normal Declaration of Major form with the Office of the Registrar. Any deviation from the program of study outlined in the description must be approved by the chairpersons of the departments involved.

Biomathematics

  1. Required Mathematics and Computer Science courses (24 credits):
    1. Math 121, 122 (Calculus Sequence) + 251 (Differential Equations)
    2. CS 141 (Computer Science I: Programming Fundamentals)
    3. Math 214 (Discrete Math Modeling with Biological Applications)
    4. Math 315 (Continuous Math Modeling with Biological Applications)
  2. Required Biology courses (14 credits) :
    1. Biology 130, 131L, 140, 141L (Intro Bio Sequence)
    2. One of the following three courses:
      1. Biology 200 + 201L (Evolution)
      2. Biology 304 + 304L (Genetics)
      3. Biology 315 + 315L (Ecology)
  3. Math Electives (8 credits): Select 2 courses from the following list in consultation with the advisor (at least one at the 300 or 400 level):
    1. Math 201 (Transition to Advanced Math)
    2. Math 223 (Multivariable Calculus)
    3. Math 261 (Linear Algebra)
    4. Math 311 (Probability Theory)
    5. Math 312 (Math Statistics)
    6. Math 321 (Real Analysis)
    7. Math 352 (Partial Differential Equations)
    8. Math 465 (Special Topics when appropriate)
    9. CS 142 (Computer Science II: Object-Oriented Programming)
  4. Biology Electives (14 credits): Select 3 courses from the following list in consultation with the advisor (2 must have a lab):
    1. Biology courses at the 200 or 300 level [Biology 307 (Cell Biology) may combine with BCMB 310 (Methods in Cell Biology and Biochemistry) to satisfy a lab elective]
    2. Chemistry 414 (Biochemistry) [may combine with BCMB 310 (Methods in Cell Biology and Biochemistry) to satisfy a lab elective]
    3. Chemistry 416 (Mechanisms of Drug Action)
    4. Neuroscience 270 (Neuroscience) [may combine with Neuroscience 350 (Neuroscience Research Methods) to satisfy a lab elective]
  5. Senior Research (4 credits): 
    Normally, students will have two advisors: one who advises the mathematical component of their senior research and one who advises the biological component of their research. Each student will take three semesters of seminar, one the spring of their junior year (1 credit), and one each semester of their senior year (2 credits fall, 1 credit spring).
    1. Math 386 (Junior Sem), 485-486 (Senior Seminar)
  6. Recommended Courses:
    1. If considering grad school in Ecology it is strongly recommended that students take Bio 315, CS 142, and Math 311.
    2. If considering grad school in Mathematics, Biomathematics, or Mathematical Ecology it is strongly recommended that students take Math 201, 261, and 321.
    3. Students should consider Bio 160, Bio 214, or EnvS 160 as a means of fulfilling their F-11 requirement.
    4. Physics 111 + 111L (Fundamentals in Physics I) as appropriate to career goals
    5. Some classes that may be of interest:
    6. Economics 407 (Game Theory)
    7. Geology 116 (Global Environmental Change)
    8. History 105 (Special Topics: Disease & Epidemics) F2i, F3
    9. History 270 (Global Environmental History) F3, F11
    10. History 374 (Nature & War) F3
    11. History 472 (Environmental Justice) F11
    12. International Studies 340, 341 (Global Ecopolitics, Comparative Ecopolitics) F8
    13. International Studies 375 (Population and National Security) F2i
    14. Philosophy 302 (Environmental Ethics)
    15. Philosophy 303 (Medical Ethics) F1

Economics and Business

A total of sixty-four (64) credits as follows:

  1. Economics 100, 201, 202, 290, 420, 486.
  2. Business 241, 243, 351, 361, 371, 486.
  3. Four credits from Economics 250, 265, 305, 308, 310, 311, 312, 317, 318, 323, 331, 339, 343, 345, 349, 357, 360, 377, 407, 440, 465.
  4. One course from each of two of the following areas:
    1. Accounting: Business 341.
    2. Finance: Business 452, 454.
    3. Management: Business 463, 464, 466, 467, 482
    4. Marketing: Business 472, 473, 474, 482, 483
    5. Business 481.
  5. Mathematics 115, 116, or 121.
  6. Recommended: Mathematics 107; Political Science 218; Interdisciplinary 240.

Economics and International Studies

A total of 15-16 courses (60-64 credits) as follows:

  1. Economics 100, 201, 202, 290, 310, 312; either Economics 486 or International Studies 485.
  2. Economics 407 or 420.
  3. International Studies 110, 120, 300, one two-course sequence, and one additional course at 200-level or above.
  4. Mathematics 115 or 121.
  5. An appropriate foreign language through completion of the second year (202).

History and International Studies

A total of 12-13 courses (48-52 credits) as follows:

  1. History 300, and two additional courses from the following: 207, 209, 215, 216, 217, 224, 225, 226, 232, 233, 255, 256, 261, 262, 267, 275, 276, 281, 283, 288, 294.
  2. International Studies 110, 120, 300.
  3. Economics 100.
  4. A total of four additional courses, two in each department. Students must choose one of the following concentrations:
    1. Europe: History: 314, 320, 321, 327, 395, 415, 427, 428, 429; I.S. 281, 282, 283, 284, 285.
    2. Africa/Middle East: History 375, 395, 475; I.S. 243, 244, 245, 251, 252, 253
    3. Asia: History 391, 395, 481; I.S. 260, 261, 262, 263, 264, 395.
    4. Latin America: History 363, 364, 365; I.S. 273-274.
    5. Global/Comparative: History 307, 365, 389, 395, 406, 413, 427; I.S. 310, 311, 330, 332, 334, 336, 340, 341, 372, 373, 374, 420, 421, 422, 451, 452.
  5. I.S. 485. Senior paper to be written under the direction of one faculty member from each department. The senior paper should pertain to the student’s concentration.
  6. An appropriate foreign language through completion of the second year (202.)

Qualified students wishing to pursue Honors can do so by fulfilling the requirements of the interdisciplinary major and of the Honors Tutorial in either department.

Mathematics and Economics

A total of 15 courses (60 credits) as follows:

  1. Economics 100, 201, 202, 290, 407, 420.
  2. One course from Economics 305, 308, 310, 331, 357.
  3. Mathematics 121, 122, 201, 223, 251, 261.
  4. Mathematics 311 or 321.
  5. Economics 486 or Mathematics 485 and 486. Senior projects must have a faculty reader from both departments. The final presentation of the senior project must be made in the Senior Seminars of both departments.

Qualified students wishing to pursue Honors can do so by fulfilling the requirements of the interdisciplinary major and of the Honors Tutorial in either department.

Mathematics and economics majors seeking admission to graduate programs in economics, operations research, statistics, or mathematical finance are advised to also take Mathematics 312, Mathematics 431, Computer Science 141, Computer Science 142, and possibly Business 351.

Music and Psychology

A total of 16 courses (64 credits) as follows:

  1. Music Courses (6 courses, 8 performance credits = two 4-credit courses):
         a. Theory & Musicianship: MUSC 204 - Understanding Musicianship [F5]
              *Two 300-level music theory courses
              *If placement test determines this course is redundant, choose three 300-level music theory courses.

         b. History & Literature: 1 course from:
              MUSC 227 - European Musical Heritage I [F3]
              MUSC 228 - European Musical Heritage II [F3]

         c. Performance:
              4 semester of large ensembles (MUSC 180-184, 190-194= 1 credit each.)
              4 semesters of applied lessons (MUSC 160-178 = 1 credit each.)
              4 semesters of Performance Attendance (MUSC 100 = 0 credits.)

         d. Electives: Two 4-credit courses

                1. One music cognition/therapy topic course (MUSC 140-149 or MUSC 340-349.)
                2. Other courses should be selected from the following recommended list:

                     MUSC 103 – Elements of Music.
                     MUSC 117-119; 105 [F9] – World Music courses.
                     MUSC 227-228 [F3] – European Musical Heritage courses
                     MUSC 222 – Music Technology. (cognition concentration)
                     MUSC 306 – Mathematical Musical Analysis [F6]
                     MUSC 414-415 – Conducting I & II. (applied concentration)

  NOTE: Music Talent Award and Fine Arts Award recipients' conditions for waivers of Applied Music fees are outlined in their award letters, which supersedes music major and minor fee waivers are contained here.

 

   2. Psychology Courses (7 courses):
          a. Foundational Psychology Courses:
                     PSYC 150 - Foundational Issues in Psychology [F8]
                     PSYC 200 - Research Methods and Statistics
                     PSYC 211 - Statistical Methods [F6] 
          b. Perception - PSYC 216
          c. Advanced Research Methods: 1 course from PSYC 350-353.
          d. Two other courses chosen from one concentration:

                Cognition:

  1.                PSYC 306 – Language and Communication
  2.                PSYC 327 – Cognitive Processes
  3.                PSYC 345 – Cognitive Neuroscience
  4.                PSYC 451-452 – Research Practicum (4 credits)
  5.                NEURO 270 – Neuroscience
  6.                NEURO 318 – Neuroscience of Brain Disorders
     
  7.           Applied:
    1.          PSYC 220 – Psychology of Health
    2.          PSYC 222 – Educational Psychology
    3.          PSYC 224 – Psychological Disorders
    4.          PSYC 229 [F11] – Developmental Psychology: Infant and Childhood [F11]
    5.          PSYC 230 – Adolescent Development
    6.          PSYC 311 – Counseling Psychology
    7.          PSYC 326 – Learning and Motivation
    8.          PSYC 451-452 – Research Practicum (4 credits)
  8.  

   3. Senior Experience (4 credits)

  1. Either MUSC 485-486 or PSYC 485 as recommended by advisor and topic availability. The culminating Senior Seminar research project is required to integrate the fields of Music and Psychology.
  2. Other suggested courses to complement this course of study include:
    1. EDUC 201 - Foundations of Education
    2. EDUC 460  – Internship in Education [F11]
    3. FYWS 151  – American Music and Politics [F2s]
    4. MUSC 160-178 – Lessons. Four additional semesters of lessons and ensembles are recommended. (especially guitar and/or voice for applied/therapy track)
    5. MUSC 190-198 – Ensembles
    6. PHIL 270 – Philosophy of Education [F11]
    7. PHIL 328 – Philosophy of Mind and Consciousness
    8. PHYS 107 – Physics of Sound and Music [F7]
    9. PSYC 338 – Psychological Assessment
    10. PSYC 460 – Internship in Psychology
    11. PSYC 495-496 – Honors Tutorial
    12. 460 Other Internship [F11]

Political Science and International Studies

A total of 12 courses (48 credits) as follows:

  1. International Studies: 110, 120, 300, one two-course sequence, and an additional course at 200-level or above.
  2. Political Science: POLS 151; POLS 340 or 360; another 300 level course from among the following courses in American politics and policy (301, 305, 308, 318, 320, 321, 330, 340, 370); one of the following courses in political theory (212, 214, 218, 230, 314); one additional course at the 200 level or above. (POLS 262,263, 264, do not count toward the Political Science and International Studies Interdisciplinary major.)
  3. Economics 100.
  4. International Studies 485 or Political Science 485.
  5. An appropriate foreign language through completion of the second year (202.)

Russian Studies and International Studies

A total of 16 courses (64 credits) as follows:

  1. Russian 202, 205, 255, 410, 486.
  2. Two of the following: Russian 301, 302, 309.
  3. Russian 212 or 215.
  4. International Studies 110, 120, 284, 300, 485, and one additional course at 200-level or above.
  5. Economics 100.
  6. One of the following: Political Science 151, Political Science 215, or History 229.

Latin American Studies

The Latin American Studies program includes a strong language component and brings together courses from six departments: Anthropology/Sociology, Economics, History, Modern Languages (Spanish), Music, and International Studies.

Honors in Latin American Studies

  1. Completion of all requirements for the Latin American Studies major.
  2. Completion of Latin American Studies 495-496.
  3. Completion and public presentation of a substantial research project.

Project proposal must be approved by the Latin American Studies Committee by April of the junior year.

Latin American Studies: Program Committee

  • Elizabeth Pettinaroli, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures (Chair)
  • Bruno Badia, Department of Economics
  • Sarah Boyle, Department of Biology
  • Tyler Fritts, Department of Music
  • Eric Henager, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
  • David Jilg, Department of Theatre
  • Michael LaRosa, Department of History
  • Jeanne Lopiparo, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
  • Jaqueline Oliveira, Department of Economics
  • Alberto del Pozo Martinez, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
  • Ryan Rasmussen, Department of Art
  • Amy Risley, Department of International Studies

Requirements for a Major in Latin American Studies

A total of forty-two to forty-four (42-44) credits as follows:

  1. Latin American Studies 200: Introduction to Latin American Studies.
  2. Latin American Studies 485: Senior Seminar.
  3. Nine of the following courses from at least four different departments. No more than three courses in any one department may count toward the major:
  • Anthropology/Sociology 224: Latin America Before 1492.
  • Anthropology/Sociology 265: Intro. Topics in Anthropology and Sociology (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • Anthropology/Sociology 325: The Maya and Their World.
  • Anthropology/Sociology 327: Gender and Power in Latin America.
  • Anthropology/Sociology 365: Cultural Motifs (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • Anthropology/Sociology 379: Anthropology of Social Change (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • Biology 160: An International Experience in Health Care.
  • Economics 100: Introduction to Economics.
  • Economics 265: Economics of Education.
  • History 105: Special Topics (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • History 205: Special Topics (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • History 261: Colonial Latin America.
  • History 262: Modern Latin America.
  • History 267: Modern Mexico.
  • History 363: History of US-Latin American Relations.
  • History 364: History of Religion in Latin America.
  • History 365: Infinite Border: The United States and Mexico in Historic Perspective.
  • History 405: Advances Seminars (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • Humanities 201: Search in Latin America.
  • International Studies 120: Introduction to Comparative Politics.
  • International Studies 265: Topics in International Studies. (when the topic focuses on Latin America).
  • International Studies 266: Topics in International Studies (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • International Studies 273: Government and Politics of Latin America.
  • International Studies 274: Issues in US-Latin American Relations.
  • International Studies 310: Comparative Political Economy.
  • International Studies 311: International Political Economy.
  • International Studies 332 (Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • Latin American Studies 099: Special Topics in Latin American Studies.
  • Latin American Studies 265: Special Topics in Latin American Studies.
  •  Latin American Studies 365: Advanced Special Topics in Latin American Studies.
  • Music 119: Music of Latin America.
  • Spanish 302: Culture and Composition (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • Spanish 306: Introduction to Latin American Cultures and Literatures.
  • Spanish 309: Spanish in Latin America.
  • Spanish 310: US-Latino Literatures and Cultures.
  • Spanish 315: Theory and Latin American Literature.
  • Spanish 320: Spanish American Drama.
  • Spanish 323: Space and Place.
  • Spanish 325: Community Publishing/Cartoneras in LA and Memphis.
  • Spanish 330: Spanish American Poetry.
  • Spanish 340: Colonial and Global Visions in Spanish American Literatures.
  • Spanish 360: Gender in Spanish American Literature.
  • Spanish 365: Special Topics in Spanish (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • Spanish 370: Contemporary Southern Cone Literature.
  • Spanish 375: Contemporary Central American Literature.
  • Spanish 405: Literature of Mexico after 1911.
  • Spanish 406: Contemporary Novel of Spanish America.
  • Spanish 408: Spanish American Short Story.
  • Spanish 426: Imperial Discourses of the Hispanic World.

        And other courses by approval of the Director of the LAS Program

        Questions: Contact Prof. Elizabeth Pettinaroli--pettinarolie@rhodes.edu

Requirements for a Minor in Latin American Studies

A total of twenty-two to twenty-four (22-24) credits as follows:

  1. Latin American Studies 200.
  2. Five of the following courses from at least three different departments
    (Latin American Studies 460 does not count toward the three-department
    distribution.
  • Anthropology/Sociology 224: Latin America Before 1492.
  • Anthropology/Sociology 265: Intro. Topics in Anthropology and Sociology (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • Anthropology/Sociology 325: The Maya and Their World.
  • Anthropology/Sociology 327: Gender and Power in Latin America.
  • Anthropology/Sociology 365: Cultural Motifs (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • Anthropology/Sociology 379: Anthropology of Social Change (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • Biology 160: An International Experience in Health Care.
  • Economics 100: Introduction to Economics.
  • Economics 265: Economics of Education.
  • History 105: Special Topics (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • History 205: Special Topics (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • History 261: Colonial Latin America.
  • History 262: Modern Latin America.
  • History 267: Modern Mexico.
  • History 363: History of US-Latin American Relations.
  • History 364: History of Religion in Latin America.
  • History 365: Infinite Border: The United States and Mexico in Historic Perspective.
  • History 405: Advances Seminars (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • Humanities 201: Search in Latin America.
  • International Studies 120: Introduction to Comparative Politics.
  • International Studies 265: Topics in International Studies. (when the topic focuses on Latin America).
  • International Studies 266: Topics in International Studies (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • International Studies 273: Government and Politics of Latin America.
  • International Studies 274: Issues in US-Latin American Relations.
  • International Studies 310: Comparative Political Economy.
  • International Studies 311: International Political Economy.
  • International Studies 332 (Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • Latin American Studies 099: Special Topics in Latin American Studies.
  • Latin American Studies 265: Special Topics in Latin American Studies.
  •  Latin American Studies 365: Advanced Special Topics in Latin American Studies.
  • Music 119: Music of Latin America.
  • Spanish 302: Culture and Composition (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • Spanish 306: Introduction to Latin American Cultures and Literatures.
  • Spanish 309: Spanish in Latin America.
  • Spanish 310: US-Latino Literatures and Cultures.
  • Spanish 315: Theory and Latin American Literature.
  • Spanish 320: Spanish American Drama.
  • Spanish 323: Space and Place.
  • Spanish 325: Community Publishing/Cartoneras in LA and Memphis.
  • Spanish 330: Spanish American Poetry.
  • Spanish 340: Colonial and Global Visions in Spanish American Literatures.
  • Spanish 360: Gender in Spanish American Literature.
  • Spanish 365: Special Topics in Spanish (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • Spanish 370: Contemporary Southern Cone Literature.
  • Spanish 375: Contemporary Central American Literature.
  • Spanish 405: Literature of Mexico after 1911.
  • Spanish 406: Contemporary Novel of Spanish America.
  • Spanish 408: Spanish American Short Story.
  • Spanish 426: Imperial Discourses of the Hispanic World.

       And other courses by approval of the Director of the LAS Program

       Questions: Contact Prof. Elizabeth Pettinaroli--pettinarolie@rhodes.edu

Neuroscience

Neuroscience at Rhodes provides students with a nuanced understanding of the methodological challenges and conceptual issues that lie at the heart of efforts to understand the function of the nervous system and its role in behavior.

Honors in Neuroscience

In addition to maintaining a cumulative and major GPA of at least 3.5, honors candidates are required to enroll in Neuroscience 399 in the Spring of their junior year. By the start of the senior year, the candidate must submit a proposal for an independent research project for approval by the Program Committee. Up to 8 credits of Neuroscience 495-496 are taken each semester of the senior year. In addition to submitting a written report, the candidate is required to make an oral presentation at the conclusion of the research project. The honors degree in Neuroscience is contingent upon committee acceptance of the research manuscript.

Neuroscience: Program Committee

Mauricio Cafiero, Department of Chemistry
Kelly Dougherty, Department of Biology
Kim Gerecke, Department of Psychology, Chair
Jason Haberman, Department of Psychology
David Kabelik, Department of Biology
Rebecca Klatzkin, Department of Psychology
Katie White, Department of Psychology

Requirements for a Major in Neuroscience Leading to the B.S. Degree

A total of fifty-three to fifty-six (53-56) credits as follows:

  1. Eight (8) core requirements:
    1. Chemistry 120-120L
    2. Biology 130-131L
    3. Biology 140-141L
    4. Psychology 150
    5. Psychology 211 or Mathematics 211
    6. Neuroscience 270
    7. Neuroscience 350 - (this course will cease after Fall 2017; depth courses will instead be paired with labs beginning in 2018-2019)
    8. Neuroscience 485/486
  2. Two (2) depth requirements:
    1. Biology 375 or Biology 376; AND either Neuroscience 318 or Psychology 345
  3. Three (3) breadth courses from the following:
    1. Biology 204, 207, 303 or 304+304L, 307, 325, 340
    2. Chemistry 414, 416
    3. Neuroscience 451-452 (4 credits total)
    4. Psychology 216, 220, 224, 306, 327, 353
    5. Philosophy 250 (Philosophy of Neuroscience topic only), 328
    6. Up to two additional depth courses
  4. Courses recommended but not required:
    1. Chemistry 211-212
    2. Computer Science 141
    3. Mathematics 115
    4. Physics 111-112 (with laboratory)
    5. Political Science 216

Political Economy

Political Economy at Rhodes entails the study of the important works that laid the foundations of economic and political systems throughout the world, the major critiques of those systems, and the quandaries and disputes that arise at the intersection of politics and economics

Political Economy: Program Committee

Stephen J. Ceccoli, Department of International Studies
Daniel E. Cullen, Department of Political Science
Marshall K. Gramm, Department of Economics 
Teresa Beckham Gramm, Department of Economics
Renee J. Johnson, Department of Political Science
John E. Murray, Department of Economics, Chair
Robert F. Saxe, Department of History
Patrick A. Shade, Department of Philosophy
Stephen H. Wirls, Department of Political Science

Requirements for a Major in Political Economy

A total of 12 courses (48 credits) as follows:

  1. Economics 100 and 323; either Economics 201 or 202.
  2. International Studies 311.
  3. Political Science 110, 205, 218, 314.
  4. Political Economy 486.
  5. Tracks (choose one):
    • Global Track
      • Three electives (two of which must be outside of Economics) from Economics 310, 312; International Studies 220, 221, 263, 282, 340, 341, 451.
    • Historical Track
      • Three electives from Economics 339; Greek and Roman Studies 270; History 255, 256, 351, 352, 436, 439.
    • Philosophical Track
      • Philosophy 301 and two electives (one of which must be outside of Political Science) from English 265 (Literature and Economics); Philosophy 255, 303, 355; Political Science 212, 214, 230, 411.
    • Policy Track
      • Either Economics 290 or Political Science 270.
      • Two electives from Economics 305, 310, 420; Political Science 209, 280, 305, 320, 370, 470; Psychology 309.

Self-Designed Interdisciplinary Majors

The option of a self-designed interdisciplinary major is available for those students whose academic goals may best be achieved by combining and integrating the work of two or more academic departments. Like the College’s other interdisciplinary programs, the self-designed interdisciplinary major exists to provide an appropriate structure for programs of study that do not fit within the bounds of existing departments and require an interdisciplinary approach.

The majors currently offered by the College’s academic departments and interdisciplinary programs are carefully designed and rigorously reviewed by the faculty for intellectual depth and coherence. Students who wish to propose a self-designed course of study should expect that their proposals will be held to the same standards. The self-designed interdisciplinary major petition process therefore requires a significant amount of time and reflection. Students wishing to pursue this option will work closely with their advising faculty in the relevant departments to construct their proposal and to see their study through to completion.

Students who wish to pursue a self-designed interdisciplinary major must complete the required “Declaration of Interdisciplinary Major” form. In completing that form, students should follow the steps below in order to meet the rigorous criteria for the proposed program of study.

  1. Consult with faculty members in the departments that will be combined in the major to determine the feasibility of the interdisciplinary major. Consultation with the Registrar is also recommended in order to secure an understanding of the approval procedure.
  2. Prepare, in consultation with those faculty members and departments, a petition requesting the College Faculty’s approval of the interdisciplinary major. This petition is addressed to the Chairperson of the Faculty Educational Program Committee. The petition must contain the following items:
    1. An essay that articulates the student’s rationale for the interdisciplinary major. Simply explaining how courses in different departments are related is not a sufficient rationale. The rationale must specifically explain why the academic goals of the self-designed major cannot be achieved through a combination of majors and minor(s). The petitioner must demonstrate that only by integrating work in the departments can those academic goals be realized. The importance of this essay cannot be overemphasized. It is not only a statement of the student’s reasons for choosing the proposed interdisciplinary major, but also a philosophical and practical statement of (i) how the new major meets the same rigorous standards as the College’s already-existing majors, (ii) how the proposed course-plan will include truly “interdisciplinary” study, (iii) how, if there are similar programs or majors at other comparable institutions, the proposed plan for interdisciplinary study compares to those.
    2. The Declaration of Interdisciplinary Major, including a complete listing of courses that comprise the interdisciplinary major, with numbers, titles, and dates when the courses are to be taken. Though it is customary that the number of courses in each department will be fewer than what is expected of a major in that department, it is essential that substantial advanced work is done in each department. The proposed program of study must include a complete description of how the “interdisciplinary” senior experience will be structured. It must be clear how the departments involved in the major will be integrated into the senior seminar, seminars, or capstone experience. Any self-designed capstone experience should be explained in detail and should be comparable in content, rigor, and methodology to the capstone experiences for existing majors.
  3. The Declaration of Interdisciplinary Major must be endorsed in writing by the chairpersons of the concerned departments. This endorsement must include a detailed assessment of the student’s rationale and of the student’s ability to undertake and complete successfully the work projected in the petition. The departmental endorsements should also specify who will serve as the principal faculty advisor for the student. If the student’s petition includes coursework or other projects outside of the participating departments’ normal course offerings, the chairpersons should also note their awareness of those elements of the proposal and give assurances that those or comparable opportunities will be available for the student.
  4. The entire Declaration of Interdisciplinary Major with the completed petition is submitted to the Registrar for review before it is sent to the Education Program Committee for a full review and final determination. Incomplete Declarations will be returned to the student without review.
  5. Interdisciplinary majors must be declared and receive approval no later than midterm of the spring semester of the junior year. It is expected that work on the petition, interviews with faculty, and consultation with the Registrar should begin as early as possible, but will take place no later than the fall semester of the junior year. The student who submits an interdisciplinary major petition will have already declared a major by midterm of the spring semester of the sophomore year. If the interdisciplinary major can be worked out in time for the sophomore year deadline for declaring a major, it should be submitted earlier.
  6. Any proposed deviation from an approved interdisciplinary major must have departmental approvals and the approval of the Education Program Committee before changes are made in the course of study.

Urban Studies

The Urban Studies Program enables students to explore and understand the urban experience in its richness and complexity. It provides an interdisciplinary learning experience grounded in the liberal arts and connected to concerns of the region and the world. Through integrative teaching and research, students develop and apply the skills needed to analyze the dynamic processes and structures of urban life as well the ways that cities contribute to global change. Students engage fully with Memphis and the diversity of the Mid-south region, combining course work with urban field experiences including internships, fellowships, and research with community partners.

International Study

Many Urban Studies students spend a semester abroad and some of the courses may be eligible for Urban Studies credit. However, students must provide the program director with the course information before beginning the program. There are also some programs that are more appropriate for Urban Studies students such as IHP “Cities in the 21st Century” and DIS “Urban Studies in Europe.”

Requirements for a Major in Urban Studies

A total of forty four (44) credits as follows:

  1. Urban Studies 201: Introduction to Urban Studies
  2. Political Science 206: Urban Politics and Policy
  3. One 4 credit course on Race and Ethnicity in the United States
    1. Race and Ethnicity in American Society (Anthropology/Sociology 331)
    2. African American History (History 242)
    3. Black Political Thought (Political Science 230)
    4. Black Theology (Religious Studies topics course)
    5. The Civil Rights Movement (History 243)
    6. Intercultural Knowledge and Competence (Urban Studies 250) 
      (other courses may fulfill this requirement, but will require permission of the Director of Urban Studies)
  4. Urban Studies 385: Research Methods in Urban Studies
  5. One 4 credit course that provides an Urban Field Experience
    1. Urban Studies 362: Urban Field Research
    2. Urban Studies 460 (1): Internship - Urban Studies Concentration
    3. Urban Studies 460 (2): Internship - Urban and Community Health Concentration
    4. Religious Studies 460: Health Equity Internship 
      *Students in the Urban and Community Health Concentration must take Urban Studies 460 (2) or Religious Studies 460.
  6. Urban Studies 485: Senior Seminar
  7. Urban Studies Concentration (typically five, 4 credit courses).
    *In each concentration, one course must address historical and/or comparative perspectives on the urban experience.
      1. Concentration in Urban and Community Health 
        The following two courses are required as part of the concentration:
        1. Medical Sociology (Anthropology/Sociology 347), Introduction to Urban and Community Health (Urban Studies 240), Faith, Health and Justice (Religious Studies 232), Principles of Public Health (Urban Studies 235), or Anthropology of Health (Anthropology/Sociology 265)
        2. Community Psychology (Psychology 250) or Psychology of Health (Psychology 220)
          Three elective courses may be chosen from the following list. Only two of the three electives may come from the same department or program. One of these courses must be must be taken at the 300 or 400 level (Urban Studies 460 and Urban Studies 362 do not satisfy this upper level requirement.)
          1. Anthropology of Health (Anthropology/Sociology 265)
          2. Geographic Information Systems (Interdepartmental 225)
          3. Biology of Medicine (Biology 105)
          4. Embryology (Biology 209)
          5. Parasitology (Biology 220)
          6. Genetics (Biology 304 with lab OR Biology 303 without lab)
          7. Molecular Biology (Biology 325)
          8. Virology/Immunology (Biology 330)
          9. Demography of Health (Anthropology/Sociology 265)
          10. Medical Sociology (Anthropology/Sociology 347)
          11. Music and Healing (Music 105)
          12. Medical Ethics (Philosophy 303)
          13. Statistical Methods (Psychology 211)
          14. Psychology of Health (Psychology 220)
          15. Community Psychology (Psychology 250)
          16. Health Care Policy (Political Science 320)
          17. Pain, Suffering, and Death (Religious Studies 233)
          18. Faith, Health, and Justice (Religious Studies 232)
          19. Narrative Perspectives on Religion and Medicine (Religious Studies 300)
          20. Principles of Public Health (Urban Studies 235)
          21. Introduction to Urban and Community Health (Urban Studies 240)
          22. Urban Geography (Urban Studies 230)
          23. Nonprofits in the City (Urban Studies 340)
          24. Right to the City (Urban Studies 365)
          25. Global Health/Global Health Maymester (Biology 160)
          26. Note: Students who concentrate in Urban and Community Health and wish to pursue graduate study in Public Health or the medical professions should contact the Director of Health Professional Advising, in addition to working closely with an Urban Studies faculty advisor. Graduate study in Public Health, for example, typically requires the Introductory Biology Sequence and Statistics.
      2. Concentration in Urban Studies
        Five courses are selected from the Urban Studies Electives with the support of a faculty advisor in Urban Studies. These courses should support student interests and future goals. 
        *At least one additional methods course is strongly encouraged. Only one additional methods course may count as an elective for the major.
        Additional Research Methods Courses:
        1. Introduction to GIS (Interdepartmental 225)
        2. Statistical Analysis for Economics and Business (Economics 290)
        3. Statistical Methods (Psychology 211)
        4. Urban Field Research (Urban Studies 362)
        5. Research Practicum (Urban Studies 451/452)

*No more than two electives may come from any one academic department.

*Two electives must be taken at the 300 or 400 level (Urban Studies 460 and Urban Studies 362 do not satisfy this upper level requirement)

Urban Studies Electives that are regularly offered are listed below. Urban Studies elective courses may be added during the school year, including topics courses as appropriate. During registration, check Banner Web or the Urban Studies Program office for a complete list of Urban Studies electives. Other courses may be used to fulfill the major requirement provided the courses: 1) contain an urban institutional or urban issues focus, and 2) are approved for major credit by the Director of Urban Studies.

Urban Studies Electives:

  • Race and Ethnicity in American Society (Anthropology/Sociology 331)
  • Medical Sociology (Anthropology/Sociology 347)
  • Sociology of Education (Anthropology/Sociology 341)
  • The City (Anthropology/Sociology 241)
  • Urban Design (Art 265)
  • Environmental Science (Biology 120)
  • Management of Organizations (Business 361)
  • Public Economics (Economics 305)
  • Foundations of Education (Education 201)
  • Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality in Education (Education 320)
  • Environmental Geology (Geology 214)
  • African American History (History 242)
  • The Civil Rights Movement (History 243)
  • History of Poverty in the United States (History 249)
  • Urban History (History 205)
  • Black Political Thought (Political Science 230)
  • Public Policy Analysis (Political Science 305)
  • Community Psychology (Psychology 250)
  • Infant and Child Development (Psychology 229)
    Community and Program Evaluation (Psychology 350)
  • Health Equity Internship (Religious Studies 460)
  • Introduction to Urban and Community Health (Urban Studies 240)
  • Urban Geography (Urban Studies 230)
  • Intercultural Knowledge and Competence (Urban Studies 250)
  • Music and Community in Memphis (Urban Studies 262)
  • Topics in Urban Studies (Urban Studies 265)
  • Nonprofits in the City (Urban Studies 340)
  • Right to the City (Urban Studies 365)
    Music and Community in Memphis (Urban Studies 382)
  • Internship (Urban Studies 460)

Requirements for a Minor in Urban Studies

A total of 24 credits as follows:

  1. Introduction to Urban Studies (Urban Studies 201)
  2. Research Methods in Urban Studies (Urban Studies 385)
  3. One 4 credit course that provides an Urban Field Experience
    1. Urban Studies 362: Urban Field Research
    2. Urban Studies 460 (1 or 2): Internship.
    3. Religious Studies 460: Health Equity Internship. 

      Two of these courses may count toward the minor; only one is required. If two courses are taken, two additional courses should be selected from the urban studies curriculum rather than three courses as noted below.
  4. Three courses selected from the Urban Studies Curriculum (including Urban Studies major requirements and electives.) Two of these courses must come from fields outside of one’s major. No more than two courses may come from any one academic department. One course must be taken at the 300 or 400 level (the Urban Field Experiences courses do not satisfy this upper level requirement.)

Courses in the Urban Studies Major and Urban Studies Electives that are regularly offered are listed under the major. Urban Studies elective courses may be added during the school year, including topics courses as appropriate. During registration, check Banner Web or the Urban Studies Program office for a complete list of Urban Studies electives. Other courses may be used to fulfill the minor requirement provided the courses: 1) contain an urban institutional or urban issues focus, and 2) are approved for minor credit by the Director of Urban Studies.

Requirements for a Minor in Urban and Community Health

A total of 24 credits as follows:

  1. Introduction to Urban Studies (Urban Studies 201)
  2. Urban Studies Internship: Urban and Community Health Concentration (Urban Studies 460-02) or Health Equity Internship (Religious Studies 460)
  3. Four electives courses chosen from the list of electives in the Urban and Community Health Concentration (see Urban Studies Major requirements and electives.) No more than two courses may come from any one academic department. One elective course must be taken at the 300 or 400 level.

Urban Studies: Program Commitee

John Bass, Department of Music 
Sarah Boyle, Department of Biology
Zachary Casey, Educational Studies Program
Erin Cue, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow
Anita Davis, Department of Psychology
Keith Gibson, Department of Political Science
Peter Hossler, Urban Studies Program
Kendra Hotz, Department of Religious Studies
Charles Hughes, The Memphis Center at Rhodes College
Evelyn Perry, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
Elizabeth Pettinaroli, Modern Languages, Latin American Studies
Amy Risley, International Studies
Zandria Robinson, Department of Anthopology and Sociology
Charles Snyder, Health Advising
Elizabeth Thomas, Department of Psychology and Director of Urban Studies
Shaolu Yu, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow

International Studies

The Department of International Studies prepares students to understand international politics, foreign policy making, political development, international law, international organization, security and defense policy, and the politics and cultures of various countries and regions of the world.

 

Areas of Concentration

Area A: Global Leadership - includes courses numbered at the 300-level or 400-level (excluding IS 300, IS 485, and IS 495-6)

Area B: Regional Leadership - includes region-specific courses numbered at the 200-level (excluding IS 200, IS 235, and IS 256)

Other Courses (these can be either A or B area courses):

133: Model United Nations

235: Great Decisions in U.S. Foreign Policy

265-266: Selected Topics in International Studies

270: Research Methods

450: Washington Semester

460: Internship in International Studies

470: Summer Internship Abroad (Mertie W. Buckman International Internship Program)

Honors in International Studies

Required: Completing Honors in the Department of International Studies is comprised of two semesters (Fall and Spring). Students must enroll in International Studies 485 in the Fall semester of the year in which the student intends to complete the Honors Project and gain departmental approval of a research proposal. Students will select a first and second reader for the Honors Project and a third member will be selected by the department. Students should consult with an International Studies faculty member about their intentions to pursue an honors project prior to the beginning of the fall semester and obtain a copy of the “Honors in International Studies Guidelines.” A minimum GPA of 3.70 in all course work and approval of the department are required.

International Studies: Faculty and Staff

Professors

Stephen J. Ceccoli. 1998. P.K. Seidman Professor of Political Economy. B.A., Heidelberg College; M.A., Ph.D., Washington University. (International relations, political economy, comparative public policy.)

Nikolaos Zahariadis. 2016. Mertie Buckman Distinguished Professor of International Studies. B.A., Slippery Rock University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Georgia. (European Politics, International relations, comparative politics.)

Associate Professors

Esen Kirdis. 2011. J.S. Seidman Research Fellow. B.A., Koc University, Istanbul, Turkey; Ph.D., University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. (Middle East politics, Islamic politics, international relations, comparative politics.)

Shadrack W. Nasong’o. 2005. Stanley J. Buckman Professor of International Studies. B.A. and M.A., University of Nairobi, Kenya; Ph.D., Northeastern University, Boston. (African politics, comparative politics, international relations.)

Amy E. Risley. 2005. Chair. B.A., University of Wisconsin, Madison; M.A., New York University; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin. (Latin American politics, comparative politics, international relations.)

Jennifer D. Sciubba. 2008. B.A., Agnes Scott College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Maryland. (Political demography, environmental politics, international relations.)

Assistant Professors

Chien-Kai Chen. 2013. B.A., National Taiwan University; M.A., The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa; Ph.D., Boston University. (East Asian Politics, Comparative Politics, International Relations.)

Carolin Maney Purser. 2017.  B.A., Colby College; Ph.D., University of Georgia, Athens. (Comparative politics, international relations, human security.)

Adjunct Professor

Yasir Kazi. 2010. B.Sc. University of Houston; B.A. and M.A., University of Madinah, Saudi Arabia; M.A., M. Phil., Ph.D., Yale University. (Islamic Studies.)

Staff

J. Barron Boyd. 2012. Coordinator, Buckman International Studies Initiative. B.A., Rhodes College; M.A. and Ph.D., University of South Carolina. (International politics, International Human Rights, South African Politics.)
Kimberly A. Stevenson. 2008 Departmental Assistant. B.S., University of Memphis.

Requirements for a Major in International Studies

A total of fifty-two (52) credits as follows:

1. Required courses: International Studies 110, 120, 270, 300, 485.

2. Economics 100 or International Studies 311.

3. Political Science 151 or 214.

4. Twenty (20) additional credits in International Studies with at least 8 credits from each area (A - Global Leadership, and B - Regional Leadership).

5. Completion of courses in a foreign language through the second full year at the college level (through the 202-level). Any 4-credit foreign language course above the 202-level and taught in the foreign language could also be used to satisfy the language requirement.

6. Each student in the major will be required to complete an international experience. There are several ways to complete this requirement subject to the approval of the Department Chair. Students may take a study abroad course approved by the Rhodes College study abroad office; an internship in International Studies, INTS 460; or the Model UN course, INTS 133, four times. Any such international experience with course credit would count toward No. 4 above.

The Department of International Studies offers a number of interdisciplinary majors in collaboration with other departments. These majors include International Studies/Economics; International Studies/History; International Studies/Political Science; and International Studies/Russian Studies. 

 

Requirements for a Minor in International Studies

A total of twenty-four (24) credits as follows:

1. International Studies 110, 120.

2. Two-course sequence numbered 200 or above in either area A or B.

3. Two additional courses at 200-level or above (I.S. 300 is recommended.)

Master of Science in Accounting

Rhodes College offers a 32-credit program of study in accounting and business leading to the Master of Science in Accounting degree. The M.S. in Accounting is a professional master’s degree designed to provide a mature understanding of accepted professional practices in the field of accounting and to support entry and advancement in the various fields of professional accounting.

Additional Information

The M.S. in Accounting program office hours are 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday (CST). For additional information, contact:

Dr. Pamela Church
Director of M.S. in Accounting Program
Rhodes College
2000 North Parkway
Memphis, Tennessee 38112-1690
Telephone 901-843-3920
church@rhodes.edu

Academic Regulations

The M.S. in Accounting program abides by the same academic regulations as the undergraduate program at Rhodes, with the exceptions noted below.

Registration

Qualification as a full-time, degree student requires registration for a minimum of eight (8) credits in a semester. Degree-seeking students who register for seven (7) credits or less in any one semester are classified as part-time students.

Pass-Fail

A student may enroll in a class on a pass-fail basis. Permission of the instructor and the Director of the M.S. in Accounting is required and must be obtained during the first three weeks of the class in a semester. The Pass/Fail option may not be used to satisfy any of the graduate course requirements for the M.S. in Accounting degree.

Academic Probation and Suspension

To maintain acceptable scholastic standing and to graduate, a student must have an overall grade point average of 3.000 (B) for all graduate work attempted. The Graduate Committee places on academic probation any student whose cumulative grade point average at the end of a semester falls below the minimum standard. Notification of academic probation will be printed on the student grade report. A student on academic probation is not considered to be in good academic standing. Such students are ineligible to participate in some extracurricular activities, including intercollegiate athletics. A student is removed from academic probation upon attainment of a 3.000 average in graduate courses. A student placed on academic probation because of a grade point average below 3.000 has one academic semester of course work to raise his or her average to the required 3.000. If the grade point average is not raised to a 3.000, he or she may be dropped from the program. Any student who earns a D or an F in any graduate course may be dismissed immediately from the program.

Admission

Admissions Procedure

A student who wishes to apply for admission to the M.S. program should print an application form from the Rhodes College website. The completed form should be mailed to the Director of the M.S. in Accounting program with a nonrefundable application fee of twenty-five dollars.

All applicants for admission to the M.S. in Accounting program are required to submit transcripts from all colleges attended and three letters of reference.

All applicants to the graduate program must have an earned baccalaureate from an accredited institution before being admitted into the program.

Standardized Tests

Non-Rhodes applicants are required to take the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT). Rhodes students may choose to submit a GMAT score as part of the application package. Any student planning to apply to the program for fall admission should plan to take the test no later than December so that his or her scores will be available for the Graduate Admissions Committee by March 1. Test application forms may be obtained from some colleges and universities or from the GMAT website at www.mba.com. Applicants whose university instruction was not in English are also required to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language and achieve a score of 550 or above.

Provisional Admission

A limited number of students who would be denied admission based on test scores, letters of recommendation, personal interviews and transcripts may be admitted provisionally to the program if they can demonstrate high probability of success in the program and likelihood of outstanding performance in the profession of accounting in some other manner. Other criteria may include, for example, a record of outstanding performance in a job with increasing levels of responsibility over time. Any student provisionally admitted to the program must attain a grade point average of at least a 3.00 (B) on the first twelve hours of the program completed in order to remain in the program.

Admission of Special Students (Non-degree Candidates)

Students who give evidence of sufficient ability may be admitted as special students to a course offered as part of the M.S. in Accounting curriculum. Special students may take no more than two courses. After two courses, which may total no more than eight credits, the student must make formal application to the M.S. in Accounting program and be accepted into it before taking any additional graduate courses. An undergraduate student in his or her senior year may petition the graduate committee to enroll in a graduate course as a special student. In such a case, no graduate credit will be granted for courses used to satisfy undergraduate requirements. A student may apply no more than a total of four graduate credits earned as a special student and/or for transfer credit toward the requirements for the M.S. in Accounting at Rhodes.

Readmission of Students

The M.S. in Accounting degree must be completed within three academic years from the date of initial enrollment as a degree candidate. Failure to complete the degree requirements within this time will result in being dropped from the program. Any student who wants to continue the program after being dropped must petition the Director for reinstatement.

Expenses and Financial Aid

The tuition charges, regulations for payment and withdrawal, activity fees, and special fees and deposits for the M.S. in Accounting are the same as for the undergraduate program at Rhodes. These charges and policies are outlined in the “Expenses” portion of the catalogue. Room charges and policies are also the same as those for the undergraduate programs; however, on-campus rooms will be made available to graduate students only after all undergraduate demand has been satisfied.

Financial Aid

Financial assistance for students in the M.S. in Accounting program will be in the form of loans and scholarships.

Loans

Graduate students are currently eligible for Federal Stafford Loans up to $20,500 per year. Federal Stafford Loans are made on an unsubsidized basis, and the student is responsible for interest payment during periods of enrollment. Repayment begins six months after the student graduates or ceases to be enrolled at least half-time. The interest rate is fixed at 6.8%.

Anyone interested in the student loan program should contact:

Office of Financial Aid
Rhodes College
2000 N. Parkway
Memphis, TN 38112-1690
Telephone 901-843-3810

Scholarships

All applicants are automatically considered for a departmental scholarship with no additional forms required to be filed. Departmental scholarships for students in the M.S. in Accounting program are merit based; financial need is not a consideration. Selection for a scholarship is based upon the candidate’s academic record, personal achievements, and promise of success in accounting.

Master in Accounting: Faculty and Staff

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS

Dee Birnbaum. 1991. B.A., State University of New York at Stony Brook; M.B.A., Baruch College; M.Phil., Ph.D., City University of New York. (General management; human resource management.)
Pamela H. Church. 1988. Director, M.S. in Accounting Program. B.S., M.S., University of Memphis; Ph.D., University of Houston. C.P.A. (Accountancy.)

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS

Kayla D. Booker. 2015. B.B.A., M.P.A., Ph.D., Jackson State University. C.P.A. (Accountancy.)
Sujan M. Dan. 2013. B.Tech, Kerala University, India; M.S., Ph.D., Texas A&M University. (Marketing.)
Andrey Zagorchev. 2013. B.S., M.S., Plovdiv University, Bulgaria; M.B.A., Wright State University; Ph.D., Lehigh University. (Finance.)

PART-TIME ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

Milton L. Lovell. 2003. B.S., J.D., University of Mississippi. LL.M., New York University School of Law. Chief Financial Officer and General Counsel, nexAir, LLC (Accountancy; taxation.)

INSTRUCTOR

Jade O. Planchon. 2012. B.A., Rhodes College; M.B.A., Columbia University. (Finance.)

PART-TIME INSTRUCTOR

Chris Nunn. 2010. B.A., M.S., Rhodes College. Chief Financial Officer, Security Bancorp of Tennessee, Inc. (Accountancy.)

STAFF

Linda Gibson. 2006. Departmental Assistant. B.A., Vanderbilt University; M.L.S., George Peabody College.

Requirements for the M.S. Degree

A total of thirty (32) credits as follows:

Required courses. (28 credits):

  1. Business 641: Seminar in Financial Accounting Theory and Research.
  2. Business 643: Seminar in Accounting Control.
  3. Business 644: Accounting for Governmental and Not-for-Profit Entities.
  4. Business 645: Taxation of Business Organizations.
  5. Business 646: Consolidations and Advanced Accounting Topics.
  6. Business 647: Legal and Regulatory Environment of Business.
  7. Business 648: Systems Auditing.

Elective course. (4 credits) One 500- or 600-level course in the Department of Business.

Changes in Degree Requirements

A student may satisfy the requirements for an M.S. in Accounting degree as described in any catalogue that has been in effect during the student’s enrollment in the M.S. program. Students readmitted to Rhodes may graduate under requirements in effect during the original period of enrollment or by following a program incorporating features of the current and the earlier degree requirements and approved by the Graduate Committee. For students electing to graduate under earlier degree requirements, there is no guarantee that the courses specified in those requirements will be offered.

The Educational Program

The graduate program builds upon the undergraduate study of accounting by introducing more complex accounting practices and reasoning into the functional areas of accounting: cost, tax, auditing and advanced financial. The graduate program also addresses the legal environment of business and business ethics, accounting research, and the theory and methodology of the accounting discipline. It is central to the mission of the program that students be able to communicate effectively, both orally and in writing. A significant component of all graduate courses will be oral presentations and discussions as well as written assignments.

The Curriculum

Core courses and prerequisites. The following courses or their equivalents are required before beginning the graduate program. The graduate committee will evaluate a student’s transcript to determine whether a core course requirement has been met. At the committee’s discretion, a student may be allowed to take certain graduate courses concurrently with these core courses:

  1. Financial Accounting.
  2. Cost Accounting.
  3. Intermediate Accounting I and II.
  4. Federal Income Tax.
  5. Auditing.
  6. Introduction to Economics.

Area courses. A student must complete at least one course, either graduate or undergraduate, in each of the following areas:

  1. Finance.
  2. Management or Marketing.

Transfer Credit

No more than a total of eight graduate credits earned at another institution and/or graduate credit earned as a special student (see above) may be counted toward the M.S. in Accounting at Rhodes. A minimum grade of B- must be earned for any course credit to be transferred.

Transfer Credit Guidelines. The following guidelines are used in evaluating academic work from other institutions for graduate transfer credit.

  1. The institution at which the course work is taken must be an accredited college or university.
  2. Correspondence courses and distance learning (Internet) courses will not be accepted for meeting the program’s prerequisites, area courses, or degree requirements.
  3. To be accepted for credit, each course must be judged comparable in terms of content and quality to a course in the graduate curriculum at Rhodes. The Program Director makes these judgments.
  4. All course work taken at other institutions for which Rhodes receives a transcript will be evaluated for transfer credit, and if acceptable, will be posted to the student’s record.
  5. A maximum of 4 credits (1 credit = 1 semester hour) will be accepted toward the Rhodes M.S. in Accounting degree. Transfer credits based on a quarter system are converted to the Rhodes credit basis using the formula that one quarter hour equals two-thirds credit. Fractional transfer credits will be credited.
  6. Transfer credits are not accepted if the grade is C+ or below. Transfer credits are credited to the Rhodes transcript as credits only; they are not used to determine the grade point average.
  7. Transfer credit may be used to satisfy M.S. degree requirements.

Mathematics and Computer Science

The Department of Mathematics and Computer Science offers students numerous opportunities to develop quantitative reasoning, critical-thinking, problem-solving, and communication skills through its curriculum and extracurricular activities.

 

Honors in Mathematics or Computer Science

Requirements:

  1. Fulfillment of the requirements for the major.
  2. Honors Tutorial: 495 and 496.
  3. Approval by the department is required.

Students should consult with a faculty member about their intentions to pursue an honors project before the end of their Junior year.

 

Mathematics and Computer Science: Faculty and Staff

Associate Professors

Erin N. Bodine. 2010. B.S. and B.A., Harvey Mudd College; Ph.D., University of Tennessee, Knoxville. (Optimal control theory, mathematical ecology, differential equations, discrete difference equations, individual and agent based modeling.)
Eric Gottlieb. 1998. B.S., Antioch College; M.S., University of Washington; Ph.D., University of Miami. (Algebraic combinatorics.) 
Christopher Mouron. 2002. B.S., Lafayette College; M.S. and Ph.D., Texas Tech University. (Topology, continuum theory, discrete dynamical systems.)
Betsy Williams Sanders. 2007. B.S., Millsaps College; M.S. and Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. (Computer graphics and animation.)
Chris Seaton. 2004. Chair. E.C. Ellett Professorship of Mathematics and Computer Science. B.A., Kalamazoo College; Ph.D., University of Colorado at Boulder. (Differential geometry, differential topology, orbifolds, Lie groupoids, singular symplectic reduction, invariant theory.)

Assistant Professors

Ibrahim Abdelrazeq. 2015. B.S., Yarmouk University; M.S., New Mexico State University; Ph.D., University of Ottawa (Time series analysis, financial and actuarial mathematics, parametric and nonparametric goodness of fit tests.)
Sesha Dassanayake. 2017. B.A., Wabash College; M.S., University of Minnesota; M.S., University of Colorado Denver; Ph.D., University of Colorado Denver (Spatio-temporal methods for disease surveillance.)
Rachel M. Dunwell. 2005. B.Sc., Leeds University; M.Sc., Liverpool University, Ph.D., Heriot-Watt University. (Psychometrics.)
Phillip B. Kirlin. 2012. B.S., University of Maryland; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Massachusetts Amherst. (Artificial intelligence, machine learning, music informatics.)
D. Brian Larkins. 2015. B.S., M.S., Ph.D., The Ohio State University.(Parallel programming, programming languages, network security.)
Catherine E. Welsh. 2013. B.S., Ursinus College; M.S., Lehigh University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. (Bioinformatics, computational genetics.)

Staff

K. Michelle Hammontree. Departmental Assistant. B.A., University of Southern Indiana, Evansville.

Planning a Major

Students considering a major in Mathematics or Computer Science should contact the Chair or another member of the department as early as possible to ensure progress is being made toward the major. More information can be found at the department’s web site: www.rhodes.edu/mathcs.
For reasonable progress toward a major in Mathematics, a student should begin the Calculus sequence (Math 121, 122 and 223) at the appropriate level in the first year, and complete the sequence before the Spring of the second year; complete Math 201 in the first year or second year; and complete Math 261 by the end of the second year.
For reasonable progress toward a major in Computer Science, a student should begin the introductory programming sequence (Computer Science 141, 142, 241) in the first year. In the second year, a student should complete Computer Science 172 in fall and Computer Science 231 in the spring. The Mathematics requirements should be completed by the end of the third year.

Requirements for a Major in Computer Science

A total of fifty-three (53) credits as follows:

  1. Computer Science 141, 142, 172, 231, 241, 330, 485, and 486.
  2. Computer Science 350 or 355.
  3. Mathematics 121 and one additional mathematics course.
  4. Three additional four-credit computer science courses numbered above 300, excluding 495 and 496.

Requirements for a Major in Mathematics

A total of forty-nine (49) credits as follows:

  1. Mathematics 121, 122, 201, 223, 261, 386, and four credits of 485 and/or 486.
  2. Six additional four-credit courses from among mathematics courses numbered above 200 or Computer Science 141, including at least four courses numbered above 300, excluding 460, 495, and 496.

Requirements for a Minor in Computer Science

A total of twenty-four (24) credits as follows:

  1. Computer Science 141, 142, 172, 231, and 241.
  2. One additional four-credit computer science course numbered above 300.

Requirements for a Minor in Mathematics

A total of twenty-four (24) credits as follows:

  1. Mathematics 121 and 122.
  2. Four additional four-credit mathematics course numbered above 200, including at least one course numbered above 300.

Modern Languages and Literatures

The Department of Modern Languages and Literatures regularly offers instruction in Chinese, French, German, Russian, and Spanish. Details about the study of each of these languages at Rhodes are found under the subject heading for that specific language. In addition to literature and culture courses in the modern languages, the department also offers some courses in literature and culture in English translation. Classes in Portuguese are available through consortial agreement with the University of Memphis.

The F10 Degree Requirement. The degree requirement in languages may be met by the successful completion of any appropriate four-credit course numbered 201 or higher or by demonstrating proficiency through placement into a language course at a level above 201 and approval by the appropriate language faculty. Students who take 201 (or higher) or the equivalent at another institution can earn transfer credit, but must still demonstrate proficiency (see above) in the specific language before the degree requirement is satisfied. This pertains to languages that are taught at Rhodes. Students who can demonstrate native or near-native proficiency in reading, writing, speaking and listening in a language other than English may petition the department of Modern Languages and Literatures to waive the F10 requirement.

All students who plan to fulfill Rhodes’ foreign language degree requirement in a language they have previously studied for two years or more in high school must take a placement test in that language. For French, German, Russian, and Spanish, scores on that test will be used to place students in the course most appropriate for them at Rhodes. Students with fewer than two years in a language may enter that language at the 101 level. Any student who scores at the 202 level or higher will need to consult with the department to see if he or she fulfills Rhodes’ foreign language requirement. Students wishing to fulfill the F10 requirement in a language not previously studied should sign up for a course numbered 101 in that language. However, a student normally may not take a course numbered 101 in any language for academic credit if two or more years of that language were completed in high school.

In the modern languages, placement tests typically cover reading comprehension and grammar. Literature or culture courses given in translation do not satisfy the foreign language degree requirement.

Chinese

The mission of the current Chinese Studies Program is to educate students in Chinese language, literature, culture, history, politics and religion, and to provide students with academic knowledge and experiences to understand China as both an ancient civilization and an emerging global power.  In this spirit, Chinese Studies majors will also learn to appreciate their own positions vis-á-vis the challenges inherent in China's rise to global prominence, confronting difficult questions of nationalism and ethnocentrism.  As an interdisciplinary program, Chinese Studies draws on faculty expertise from various departments and prepares students for post-graduate studies.  China related employment opportunities and future engagement of China.

Requirements for a Major in Chinese Studies

A total of 36 credits as follows:
1. Chinese 301 (Advanced Chinese I) and 302 (Advanced Chinese II).
    China Maymester may be substituted for one of the above.

2. One of the following:
    Chinese 306: Introduction to East Asian Cultures
    Chinese 314: Introduction to Chinese Culture

3. Two of the following:
    Chinese 305: Modern Chinese Literature in Translation
    Chinese 307: Orientalism and Global China on Screen
    Chinese 315: Gender in Chinese Literature
    Chinese 316: Asian Urbanization/Cinema
    Chinese 320: Contemporary Chinese Cinema
    (Chinese 305-320 can be taken in conjunction with one credit of 311.)
    Chinese 409: Special Topics

4. Two of the following:
    History 282: Traditional China
    History 283: Modern China
    History 481: Cold War in East Asia
    Religious Studies 258/Philosophy 250: Asian Philosophies

5. One of the following:
    INTS 261: Government and Politics of China
    INTS 262: China’s Foreign Policy
    INTS 263: Comparative Political Economy of East Asia
    INTS 264: China-Taiwan-US Relations

6. Chinese 485: Senior Seminar

Requirements for a Minor in Chinese Studies

A total of twenty (20) credits in Chinese language (above the level of intermediate Chinese 202), literature and culture. The credits are spread across the following courses:

  1. 1. Chinese 301 and 302: Advanced Chinese*
  2. 2. Two of the Chinese Literature and Culture courses:
    1. Chinese 205: Modern Chinese Literature in Translation
    2. Chinese 206: Introduction to East Asian Cultures
    3. Chinese 210: Chinese Literary Heritage
    4. Chinese 214: Introduction to Chinese Culture
    5. Chinese 215: Gender in Chinese Literature
    6. Chinese 220: Contemporary Chinese Cinema
  3. 3. One of the following courses:
    1. History 282: Traditional China
    2. History 283: Modern China
    3. International Studies 261: Government and Politics of China
    4. International Studies 262: China’s Foreign Policy

*Students may substitute 409 for 301 or 302.

French

Honors in French

A minimum of 44 hours above the 200-level courses in French; a research paper on a specific literary topic; demonstrated proficiency in spoken and written French; and study abroad (at least one semester.)

Requirements for a Major in French

A total of forty (40) credits as follows:

  1. French 202*.
  2. French 301, 485, 486.
  3. French 321 or 322.
  4. French 323 or 324.
  5. Twenty (20) additional credits in French (5 four-credit courses) at the 300-400 level, three of which must be in literature.

Recommended: A second modern language or Latin; related courses in English, history, philosophy, and art.

Majors are strongly encouraged to spend their junior year in a French or Francophone university. Departmentally pre-approved courses taken there will normally be accepted as courses in the major.

Requirements for a Minor in French

A total of twenty (20) credits as follows:

  1. French 202*.
  2. French 301.
  3. French 323 or 324.
  4. Additional elective four-credit courses at the 300-400 level. French 202, 301, and 323 or 324 must be taken before elective courses above 324 are attempted.

Minors are strongly encouraged to spend at least one term of their junior year in a French or Francophone university. Departmentally pre-approved courses taken there, beyond French 324, will count as elective courses in the minor. French 305 counts as one elective course in the French minor.

*Students who place into the 300-level are neither required nor permitted to take French 202 for credit toward the major or minor. Students placed at the 300-level are still required to take a total of 40 credits for the major and 20 credits for the minor. Students who choose to take appropriate 300-400 level courses offered by the French section in English may count only one course taught in English toward the major or minor.

German

Honors in German

A minimum of 40 credits above German 201; a research paper on a specific literary, linguistic, or cultural topic; demonstrated proficiency in spoken and written German.

Requirements for a Major in German Studies

A total of nine courses (36 credits) above 201 as follows:

  1. German 301 and 302. Must be taken before any other 300-level course is attempted but may be taken concurrently with others. German 305 taken abroad may be substituted for one of these.
  2. German 320 and 321 (each must be taken in conjunction with one credit of 311.)
  3. Two of the following: German 340-348 (Students who wish to count these toward the German major will do portions of the work in German.)
  4. German 409 (topics vary.)
  5. German 202 may be applied to the major unless a student places into a higher level course in the curriculum.
  6. One of the following courses may be applied to the major: German 240-248. (Students who wish to count these toward the German major will do portions of the work in German.)
  7. German 486 (Senior Paper). Required for majors.

Majors are strongly encouraged to participate in the exchange program with the University of Tübingen, the University of Landau, or with a departmentally approved ISEP program during their junior years; equivalent courses from there will be accepted as substitutes.

Recommended: A second foreign language; related courses in English, international studies, philosophy, and history.

Requirements for a Minor in German Studies

A total of five courses (20 credits) above 201 as follows:

  1. German 301 and 302. Must be taken before any other 300-level course is attempted but may be taken concurrently with others. German 305 taken abroad may be substituted for one of these.
  2. At least one of the following: German 320-321 (each must be taken in conjunction with one credit of 311.)
  3. At least one course numbered 340 or higher.
  4. German 202 may be applied to the minor unless a student places into a higher level course in the curriculum.

Minors are also strongly encouraged to spend at least a semester at the University of Tübingen, the University of Landau, or with a departmentally approved ISEP program; equivalent courses from there will be accepted as substitutes.

Modern Languages and Literatures: Faculty and Staff

Professors

Michelle Mattson. 2004. B.A., University of Minnesota; M.A., Ph.D., Stanford University. (Twentieth-century German literature and culture, Gender and Sexuality Studies)

Associate Professors

Elizabeth Bridges. 2010. B.A. Hendrix College; M.A. University of Arkansas; Ph.D. Indiana University (Late-Eighteenth through Early Twentieth-century German Studies, Film Studies, Gender and Sexuality Studies.)
Kathleen Anne Doyle. 1999. B.A., Saint Xavier College, Chicago; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Chicago. (Spanish Language, Modernism in Spain, Contemporary Peninsular Spanish literature, Gender and Sexuality Studies.)
Han Li. 2008. B.A. Nanjing University; Ph.D. University of California, Irvine  (Literature and culture of Late Imperial China.)P.
Eric Henager. 1995. Chair. B.A., Rhodes College; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Illinois. (Spanish language, Contemporary Spanish-American literatures and cultures, popular culture and literature, Latin American Studies.)
Alexandra Kostina. 1996. M.A. Novgorod State University; Ph.D. Gornyi University/Russian State Pedagogical University (Russian Language, Linguistics, and Culture.)
Felix Kronenberg. 2009. M.A. University of Regensburg, Germany; Dr.phil. University of Regensburg, Germany (Language Acquisition and Technology, Stereotypes in Advertising, German Culture.)
Laura Loth. 2009. B.A. College of William and Mary; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Minnesota (Nineteenth- and Twentieth-century French Studies, Francophone Literatures, Gender and Sexuality Studies.)
Shira Malkin. 1990. Doctorat de Troisiéme Cycle, Université de Paris VII; Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo. (French language and literature, drama, intercultural education, and translation.)
Elizabeth Marcela Pettinaroli. 2007. B.A. Franklin and Marshall College; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Virginia (Early Modern Hispanic literature, Spanish American literature, Space and Place.)
Alberto del Pozo Martínez. 2008. Licenciado en Filologia, Universidad de Zaragoza. M.A. and Ph.D. Vanderbilt University (Modern Spanish American Literature and Literary Theory.)
Chia-rong Wu. 2011. B.A. National Kaohsiung Normal University; M.A. National Dong Hwa University; Ph.D. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (Modern Chinese Literature and Culture.)

Assistant Professors

Rachel Noël Bauer. 2008. B.A. Duquesne University; M.A. Purdue University; Ph.D. Vanderbilt University (Early Modern Spanish Literature, Golden Age Narrative, Don Quixote de la Mancha.)
Brandy Brown. 2013. B.A. Middle Tennessee State University; M.A. The Pennsylvania State University (Medieval and Early Modern French Literature, Medieval and Modern Arthuriana, Genre Studies, Print Culture Studies.)
Clara Pascual-Argente. 2011. B.A. and M.A. Universidad de Salamanca; Ph.D. Georgetown University (Medieval and Early Modern Spanish Literature, Film Studies.)
Catherine Sundt. 2012. B.A. Grand Valley State University; M.A. and Ph.D. The Ohio State University (Modern Spanish Literature and Urban Literature)

Instructors

Nora Jabbour. 2002. B.A. Universidad Rafael Landívar; M.A. Mississippi State University (Spanish Language and Hispanic Cultures). 

Staff

Christy Waldkirch 2005. Departmental Assistant.

Modern Languages and Literatures: General Courses

Modern Languages 150. Selected Foreign Languages.

Credits: Variable.

Certain foreign languages not listed above as regular course offerings are taught on occasion. Information concerning languages not regularly taught may be obtained from the Registrar or the department chair.

Modern Languages 240. Language Acquisition and Pedagogy.

Spring. Credits: 4

This course is a survey of a range of issues related to language acquisition and teaching. Among the areas covered are instructional methodologies and approaches, second language acquisition theories, language skill development, language teaching and learning technology, communicative and cultural competency, and assessment.

Rhodes offers a secondary licensure program within the Teaching and Learning track of the Educational Studies major. This program prepares students to teach middle and/or high school in one of eleven endorsement areas, including the following languages: Chinese, English, French, German, Latin, Russian, and Spanish. The course of study for secondary licensure students is designed with guidance from faculty members in the discipline in which the student is being certified as well as members of the Educational Studies Program. All secondary licensure candidates are required to double major in Educational Studies and their endorsement discipline.

Modern Languages 280. Introduction to General Linguistics.

Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F9.

The Introduction to General Linguistics course presents language as a specific object of knowledge, thought, science, and philosophy. Students will be introduced to the major linguistic theories and examine language as a system and structure at its various levels, as well as a tool to guide, plan, and monitor human activity. Offered in alternate years.

Modern Languages 460. Internship.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 1-4.

Degree Requirements: F11

Internships in the departmental languages are occasionally available for language majors and permit a qualified student to receive academic credit for an internship experience on or off campus, for example by working with a business, a non-profit organization, or within the department itself. The internship, which requires of the student an advanced competence in a foreign language, must entail a significant encounter with a foreign language. Working with a faculty mentor, students must submit a project proposal for the internship prior to the beginning of the internship itself. The completed project will be graded by the faculty mentor. Intradepartmental internships will be reserved for students planning to continue their studies in a foreign language and culture beyond the undergraduate level. Such internal internships will involve working with a faculty mentor on projects of a diverse nature that seek to enhance the program offerings of the language section. Placements must be approved by the faculty mentor who teaches the language in question and the chair of the department. Internship credit will not be awarded retroactively and does not count toward the total number of credits required for the major.
Pass/Fail only.

 

Russian

Programs Abroad

Rhodes College maintains a close relationship with the Gornyi Institute in St. Petersburg, where the Russian Studies Program’s Maymesters take place (see 209, 309, 256 descriptions). Through affiliation with Bard College, Rhodes students of Russian can study at the Smolny Institute of St. Petersburg for a semester or a year. In addition, students studying Russian can spend a summer, semester, or academic year in Russia through such nationally-recognized programs as the Council for International and Educational Exchange (CIEE) in St. Petersburg or the American Council on the Teaching of Russian (ACTR) in Moscow.

Requirements for a Major in Russian Studies

A total of forty (40) credits above Russian 201 as follows:

  1. Russian 202.
  2. Russian 205; and either 212 or Humanities 201. (Russian literature track)
  3. Two courses from Russian 301, 302, 309.
  4. Russian 410, 486.
  5. Russian 300 or 400.
  6. One course from Russian 215, 255, ML280.
  7. One course in Russian history approved by the program coordinator.

Recommended (do not count toward the 41 credits needed for the major): Economics 323 (Classical and Marxian Political Economy) and IS 284 (Russian Successor States.) Majors are encouraged to spend at least one semester studying in Russia.

Requirements for a Minor in Russian Studies

A total of twenty (20) credits as follows:

  1. Russian 301, 302, and 410.
  2. Two of the following: Russian 205, 212, 215, 255, 300, 400.

Minors are encouraged to spend at least one Maymester in Russia.

Russian: Offerings

101-102. Elementary Russian.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4-4.

Elementary grammar, reading, and conversation, supplemented by materials on Russian culture.

201-202. Intermediate Russian.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4-4.

Degree Requirement: F10 for 201.

Intermediate grammar and continued training in conversation and composition, supplemented by assignments in the Language Center. Reading of Russian texts of graded difficulty.

Prerequisites: Russian 101-102 or equivalent.

205. The Russian Mind.

Fall. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F4.

Study and analysis of the major intellectual currents of modern Russian history through literature, religious philosophy, and film. The study of these works is intended to identify some important attributes of the Russian national identity. Literary works will include those by Blok, Akhmatova, Soloukhin, Rasputin, and Petrushevskaya. Works of religious philosophy are by Soloviev, Florensky, Berdiaev, and Bulgakov. Films will include Dersu Uzala, The Barber of Siberia, and The Russian Ark.

209. Russian in Russia.

Summer. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F10 for 209, F11.

A 3-4 week guided encounter with the language and culture aimed at solidifying vocabulary and grammar previously acquired. A significant cultural component is part of the course. Takes place in May-June.

212. Masterpieces of Russian Literature in Translation.

Fall. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F4.

Reading of representative works by major Russian writers of the nineteenth century (including Pushkin, Pavlova, Gogol, Goncharov, Soboleva, Turgenev, Tolstoy, and Dostoevsky). The literary works include Eugene Onegin, supernatural tales by Gogol, Oblomov, The Cossacks, Notes from Underground, and Fathers and Children. These works will be studied for their individual merit, what they illuminate about nineteenth-century Russian society, and their contribution to the rise of the Russian novel. All works are read in translation.

215. Giants of Russia’s Silver Age: Soloviev, Blok, and Rachmaninoff.

Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5, F9.

Study of the aesthetic, thematic, and personal connections among three of Russia’s towering figures: Vladimir Soloviev, Alexander Blok, and Sergei Rachmaninoff. The course will examine in depth the creative works of the philosopher-poet Soloviev, the poet-dramatist Blok, and the composer-pianist Rachmaninoff (for whom poetry was second only to music). Master themes and global concepts linking the three creative artists include the yearning for harmony; exploration of Russian Orthodox religiosity; elevation of the –eternal feminineî of Sophia (the body of God); and connection between beauty and goodness. Representative philosophical, poetic, and musical works, respectively, of the three artists will be examined. Offered in alternate years. Scheduled for Spring, 2013.

Prerequisite: At least one course from the following departments or programs: Music, Philosophy, Religious Studies, or Russian Studies.

255. Catherine the Great and the Enlightenment: The Italian-Russian Connection.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5, F9.

In this course students investigate the Italian-Russian connections in three major areas of cultural production during the reign of Catherine the Great: music, literature, and architecture. Creative thinkers whose works will be studied include Bortnyansky, Paisiello, Casanova, Beccaria, Rastrelli, and Quarenghi. Students will learn features of the European and Russian Enlightenments, study the intricacies of Russian court culture, and explore the institution of patronage. The course aims to develop an understanding of cross-cultural fertilization and some major differences between Mediterranean and Slavic cultures. It is complemented by an optional, though highly recommended, three-week study trip to Italy and Russia (See Russian 256). Offered in alternate years. Scheduled for Fall, 2012.

256. Catherine the Great and the Italian-Russian Connection.

Summer. Credits: 0-1.

Degree Requirements: F11.

This Maymester program examines the musical, literary, and architectural connections between Italy and Russia during the reign of Catherine the Great. It takes participants to three cities: Rome, Milan, and St. Petersburg. In Rome students will attend lectures at LUMSA (university adjacent to the Vatican), attend a musical performance at the Teatro dell’Opera, visit places associated with Giacomo Casanova, and investigate architectural monuments by Italian architects whom Catherine attracted to Russia. In Milan participants will attend an opera at the Teatro all Scala and visit sites associated with Cesare Beccaria. In St. Petersburg students will attend performances in the Great Hall of the St. Petersburg Philharmonic and the Mariinsky Theatre, and will study major architectural ensembles. Takes place in May and June.

300. Dostoevsky.

Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F4.

This course explores selected works by Dostoevsky in the context of the rise of the Russian novel. The course will examine in depth several short works by the writer, as well as the novels The Idiot and The Brothers Karamazov. Concentration is on the major literary, philosophical, and religious issues Dostoevsky raises in his prose, as well as how these issues better enable us to understand the Russian mind. All works are read in translation.

301-302. Advanced Russian.

Fall ,Spring. Credits: 4-4.

Advanced grammar, with greater emphasis on the refinement of conversation and composition skills. Discussion of topics related to contemporary life in Russia.

Prerequisites: Russian 201-202 or equivalent.

309. Russian in Russia.

Summer. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F10 for 209, F11.

A 3-4 week guided encounter with the language and culture aimed at solidifying vocabulary and grammar previously acquired. A significant cultural component is part of the course. Takes place in May-June.

400. Russian Film: Film Theory.

Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5.

Introduction to the ideological and aesthetic forces that have shaped the development of Soviet/Russian film, with particular attention to various film theories. Films of major directors, such as Eisenstein, Pudovkin, Tarkovsky, Kulidzhanov, and Sokurov will be studied. All films are subtitled; course is taught in English. (Cross-listed with English 382.) Offered in alternate years.

410. Analytical Reading.

Fall. Credits: 4.

This course aims to teach students the strategies of understanding texts of high literary quality by analyzing elements of given texts in their complexity. While focusing mainly on psycho-poetic aspects of reading activity, the course also introduces formal approaches to text analysis, such as identifying the stylistic devices and expressive means employed by the authors.

486. Senior Seminar.

Spring. Credits: 4.

Students will be assigned individual research topics associated with the essential concept of the Russian Idea, give weekly progress reports, which will involve analytical discussion, and present their results orally and in writing at the end of the course. Special attention will be given to assigned readings from the Russian press and from Russian literature.

495-496. Honors Tutorial.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4-8, 4-8.

Spanish

Honors in Spanish

A minimum of 40 credits above Spanish 202, reading in a field of specialization and preparation of a paper in that field; examinations covering Spanish literature, Spanish American literature and civilization, Spanish grammar and Spanish civilization, and the field of specialization. Approval by the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures is required.

Requirements for a Major in Spanish

A total of thirty-six (36) credits above Spanish 202. At least five courses must be completed at or above the 310 level. Required courses are the following:

  1. Spanish 301 or 302. (the other may be taken as an elective)
  2. Spanish 303, 306, and 486.
  3. Five elective courses, at least four of which must be numbered 310 or above.

Requirements for a Minor in Spanish

A total of twenty (20) credits above Spanish 202. At least one course must be completed at or above the 310 level. Required courses are the following:

  1. Spanish 301 or 302. (the other may be taken as an elective)
  2. Spanish 303 or 306. (the other may be taken as an elective)
  3. Three elective courses, at least one of which must be numbered 310 or above.

The Language Learning Center

The Language Center is a support and resource space for language students and faculty. It offers a variety of technology, digital media, and non-digital resources. It offers professional development opportunities for Rhodes language faculty and curricular support, and functions as space for social interaction.

Music

Becoming a Major in Music:

Students intending to major in music are required to pass an audition on their principal instrument. This audition will take place during their semester jury/exam, which can be as early as their first semester of study, but is recommended to occur no later than mid-sophomore year. They must complete a Declaration of Major form which includes: an outline of their proposed course of study, an essay which details why they wish to major in music, and consultation with their academic advisor.
 

Sophomore-Year Review

Music majors are required to undergo a sophomore-year review. This review includes assessment of all previous juries (at least three semesters of study on their principal instrument), and an interview with full-time music faculty, which will take place in January of the student’s sophomore year. This review helps assess academic and artistic progress, and helps focus direction for the remainder of their undergraduate studies in music.

Honors in Music

  1. Fulfillment of the requirements for a major in music.
  2. Intensive work in at least one of the following areas: music history, music theory, performance, conducting, or composition.
  3. A substantial in-depth thesis or creative project in one or more of the areas studied.

Music Theory Placement

A music theory placement test is given by the department to determine a student’s skill level. Any student demonstrating the appropriate degree of proficiency may place into either Music 204 or a 300-level music theory elective (306-313). Students may, alternatively, fulfill this prerequisite by taking Music 103 before beginning the theory sequence. Music majors and minors who encounter a closed music course in the registration process should contact the instructor to be admitted.

Music: Faculty and Staff

Professor

William M. Skoog. 2009. Chair. B.A., Gustavus Adolphus College; M.A., University of Denver; D.A., University of Northern Colorado. (Director of Choral Activities, Conducting, Voice.)

Associate Professor

Carole Choate Blankenship. 1990. B.A., Rhodes College; M.M., D.M.A., University of Memphis. (Voice, Music Theory, Music Literature.)
Thomas E. Bryant. 1987. B.M., M.M., University of Georgia; D.M., Northwestern University. (Piano, Collaborative Piano, Music Literature.)
Courtenay L. Harter. 2000. B.F.A., Carnegie Mellon University; M.M., Northwestern University; Ph.D., University of Connecticut. (Music Theory, Music Cognition, Oboe/English Horn, Chamber Music.)
Vanessa L. Rogers. 2010. B.M.E., Illinois Wesleyan University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Southern California. (Music History, Music Literature, Search.)

Assistant Professors

John B. Bass, III. 2010. B.M., University of Southern Mississippi; M.M., Ph.D., University of Memphis. (Director of the Mike Curb Institute.)
Leah McGray. 2013. B.M., B.M.E., Acadia University; M.M., University of Toronto, Ph.D., Northwestern University. (Director of Instrumental Studies, Conducting, Chamber Music.)

Adjunct Instructors

Mike Assad. B.M., University of Kentucky; M.M., University of Memphis. (Percussion, World Drum Ensemble.)
Sara Chiego. B.M., University of Memphis; M.M., Cincinnati Conservatory of Music. Memphis Symphony Orchestra. (Double Bass.) 
Rena Feller. B.M., Oberlin College Conservatory of Music; M.M., The Juilliard School. Memphis Symphony Orchestra. (Clarinet.)
Sandra Franks. B.M., University of Mississippi; M.M., Louisiana State University; D.M.A., University of Mississippi. (Voice.)
Jane Gamble. B.A., Lambuth College; M.M., M.S.M., D.M.A., University of Memphis. (Collaborative pianist/organist.)
Brian Hodge. B.M.E., East Tennessee State University; M.M., University of Memphis; Ph.D in progress, University of Memphis. (Rhodes Wind Ensemble, Rhodes Orchestra.)
Sabrina Hu. B.M., Mannes College of Music; M.M., Royal Northern College of Music; D.M.A., Michigan State University. (Flute, Flute Ensemble.)
Marcus King. B.M.E., University of Memphis; M.M., University of Memphis. (Voice.)
Ellen B. Koziel. B.A., Radford University; M.M., University of Memphis; Ph.D. in progress, University of Memphis. (Rhodes Women's Chorus)
Mona B. Kreitner. B.M., Mansfield University; M.M., Eastman School of Music; Ph.D., University of Memphis. (Voice, Music History and Literature.)
Francisco Lara. B.M., Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, M.M., Ph.D., The Florida State University, Tallahassee. (Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Music Theory.)
David T. Lay. B.M., Lambuth University. (Guitar, Contemporary Commercial Music Ensemble.)
Michael Mackenzie. B.M.E., University of Memphis. (Trumpet.)
Paul Murray.  B.A., Rhodes College 01'; M.M., San Francisco Conservatory of Music. (Voice.)
Gina Neupert. B.M., Indiana University; M.M., University of Southern California. (Harp, Harp Ensemble.)
Brian Ray. B.M., University of Tennessee at Martin; M.M., University of Memphis; D.M.A., University of Memphis. (Piano, Department Collaborative Pianist.)
John Ross. B.M., Northern Illinois University; M.M., Illinois State University. (Guitar, Guitar Ensemble.)
Jane Gerard-Schranze. B.M., Eastman School of Music; M.M., New England Conservatory. (Viola, Violin, chamber music.)
David L. Shotsberger. B.M., M.M., The Pennsylvania State University; D.M.A., University of Memphis. (Music Technology, Composition.)
Debra H. Smith. B.M., Mississippi College; M.M., University of Memphis. (Piano, Organ, Music Literature and Theory.)
Gerald Stephens. B.F.A., Commercial Music/Recording Technology, University of Memphis. (Jazz Piano, Jazz Combo.)
Kate Stimson. B.A., Hollins College; M.M., University of Memphis. (Piano.)
Lester Robert Sunda, Jr. (Jazz Bass Guitar, Jazz Combo.)
Mark Vail. B.M., University of North Texas. Memphis Symphony Orchestra. (Trombone, Low Brass.)
Yukiko Whitehead. B.M., University of Tennessee; M.M., D.M.A., University of Memphis; Yamaha Music Foundation Suzuki Piano Teachers Certificate, Suzuki Association of America. (Piano.)
Carl R. Wolfe. U.S. Navy Chief Musician (ret.); U.S. Armed Forces School of Music. Memphis Jazz Orchestra. (Saxophone.)
Wen-Yih Yu. Diploma, National Academy of Arts, Taiwan; M.M., Mannes College of Music. Memphis Symphony Orchestra. (Violin, String Quartet.)
Iren Zombor. B.A., Franz Liszt Conservatory of Music, Hungary; M.A., University of Massachusetts-Amherst. Memphis Symphony Orchestra. (Cello, String Quartet.)

Staff

Erika Pope  Musical Arts Coordinator. B.A., Henderson State University.
Jacob Church Recording Technician. B.A., Rhodes College.
Dennis Holland Piano Technician.

Requirements for a Major in Music

A total of fifty-six 56 credits (10 courses; 16 performance credits = four 4-credit courses) as follows:

      1. Three Music Theory Courses (12 credits)
                 a.   MUSC 204 - Understanding Musicianship [F5]*      
                 b.   Two 300-level music theory courses
                       *If placement test determines this course is redundant, choose three 300-level music theory courses.

       2. Three Music History & Literature courses (12 credits)
                a.   MUSC 227 - European Musical Heritage I [F3]
                b.   MUSC 228 - European Musical Heritage II [F3]
                c.   One F9 (world Music) elective: MUSC 117, 118, 119, or selected 105 sections

       3. Two 4-credit Music electives (8 credits) 
                MUSC 101 does not fulfill this requirement.
                Courses from Music 160-199 do not fulfill this requirement.

       4. Performance (16 credits)
                a. 8 semesters of applied music lessons (MUSC 160-178 = 1 credit each)
                b. 8 semesters of large ensembles (MUSC 180-184, 190-194) = 1 credit each)

       5. Senior Experience (8 credits)
                Conducting (MUSC 414-415)
                Senior Seminar & Presentation (MUSC 485-486)

Once declared, Music majors will have the Applied Music fees waived for up to eight (8) credits of their principal applied instrument. Music majors taking more than eight (8) credits of Applied Music and lessons taken prior to declaration of the major will be charged the applied fee for those credits.

NOTE: Music Talent Award and Fine Arts Award recipients' conditions for waivers of Applied Music fees are outlined in their award letters, which supersedes music major and minor fee waivers as contained here.

 

Requirements for a Minor in Music

  1. One Music Theory course (4 credits): 
           a. MUSC 204 (Understanding Musicianship) or one 300-level music theory course, depending on placement.
     
  2. One of the Music History & Literature survey courses (4 credits)
           a. MUSC 227 - European Musical Heritage I [F3]
           b. MUSC 228 - European Musical Heritage II [F3]
     
  3. Performance (8 credits)
           a. 4 semesters of lessons (MUSC 160-178 = 1 credit each)
           b. 4 semesters of large ensembles (MUSC 180-184, 190-194 = 1 credit each)
     
  4. Two 4-credit Music electives (8 credits):
           a. Courses from MUSC 160-199 do not fulfill this requirement.
     

Once declared, Music minors will have the Applied Music fees waived for up to four (4) credits of their principal applied instrument. Music minors taking more than four (4) credits of Applied Music and lessons taken prior to declaration of the minor will be charged the applied fee for those credits.

NOTE: Music Talent Award and Fine Arts Award recipients' conditions for waivers of Applied Music fees are outlined in their award letters, which supersedes music major and minor fee waivers as contained here.

Philosophy

The Department of Philosophy helps students explore questions concerning the nature of reality, the role of values, obligations and choice in moral life, the sources of truth and meaning, and the power and limits of human reason and understanding. 

Honors in Philosophy

  1. Courses required: fulfillment of the requirements for a major in Philosophy.
  2. Honors course: Philosophy 399, 495-496.
  3. Examination: an oral examination on the honors essay and related field is required.
  4. Approval of the honors project by the Philosophy Department Honors Committee is required.

Philosophy: Faculty and Staff

Associate Professors

Patrick A. Shade. 1996. B.A. and M.A., Colorado State University; M.A. and Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. (Ethics; American philosophy; history of philosophy; logic; interdisciplinary humanities.)
Mark P. Newman. 2010. Chair. B.A., California State University, Sacramento; M.A., Ph.D., University of California, San Diego. (Philosophy of science; epistemology; metaphysics; philosophy of mind; philosophy of religion; logic.)

Assistant Professors

Rebecca Tuvel. 2014. B.A., McGill University; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. (Social-Political Philosophy; Animal and Environmental Ethics; Feminist Philosophy; 20th century French philosophy; social epistemology.)

Julia Haas. 2016. B.A., Concordia University; M.A. and Ph.D., Emory University. (Philosophy of Mind; Philosophy of Cognitive Science; Philosophy of Neuroscience.)

Staff

Stephanie Cage. Departmental Assistant.

Requirements for a Major in Philosophy

A total of forty-four (44) credits as follows:

  1. Philosophy 201, 203, 206, 220, 301, 486.
  2. Philosophy 318 or Philosophy 319.
  3. Four additional four-credit courses in Philosophy.

Requirements for a Minor in Philosophy

A total of twenty-four (24) credits as follows:

  1. Philosophy 201 or 203. (students are encouraged to take both)
  2. Philosophy 206 and 301.
  3. At least two additional four-credit courses in the 300’s or above.
  4. One additional four-credit course in Philosophy.

Physical Education

Physical Education classes are offered each semester for students who wish to take courses to fulfill degree requirements and for their own growth, development, and pleasure. Courses are taught for seven weeks (one-half of a semester), and all classes are open to both men and women. Courses offered during the first seven weeks of the semester are numbered in the 100s, and courses numbered in the 200s are offered during the second seven weeks of the semester.

Three half-semester courses of Physical Education are required for graduation under Foundation 12. These courses carry no academic credit and are graded on a pass-withdraw basis. For each successfully completed, full-semester course in one of the ROTC programs, a student will be credited with one course of the Physical Education degree requirement of three courses.

Physical Education courses for which proper registration is not made will not be credited to a student’s record retroactively. It is the student’s responsibility to be sure that he or she is properly registered for the course during the semester in which it is taken.

Physics

All prospective physics majors should consult with the Department Chairperson as early as possible. As noted, prospective physics majors should take in their first year Physics 111-112 and associated laboratory. Physics 101, 105, and 107 may not be used for credit towards a major or minor in physics, but they may be used for general degree credits.

Honors in Physics

  1. Courses required: those listed for the B.S. degree with a major in physics, plus Physics 495-496, Honors Tutorial.
  2. A research project in physics, usually involving a topic related to Physics Faculty research. The Honors Project must be approved by the Department of Physics and must follow the department and college guidelines and schedule for honors work. A creditable thesis must be presented to the Department at the end of the academic year.

Physics: Faculty and Staff

Professors

Brent K. Hoffmeister. 1996. B.A., Wabash College; Ph.D., Washington University. (Ultrasonics, medical physics.)

Associate Professors

Ann M. Viano. 1999. Chair. B.S., Santa Clara University; Ph.D., Washington University. (Materials science, solid-state physics, medical imaging.)
Shubho Banerjee. 2002. The Van Vleet Fellow in Physics. M.S., Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur; Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University. (Electrostatics, thermodynamics, theoretical physics.)
David S. N. Rupke. 2010. The J. Lester Crain Professor of Physics. B.S., Calvin College; Ph.D., University of Maryland. (Observational and extragalactic astronomy.)

Assistant Professors

Elizabeth J. Young. 2014. B.A., Smith College; B.E., Dartmouth College; Ph.D.; Princeton University. (Exoplanet imaging, astronomy instrumentation, optics.)

Technical Associate

Glen W. Davis. B.S., University of Memphis; M.S., Murray State University.

Instructional Support Specialist

Victor O. Obadina (Lanre). B.S., Fisk University; M.S., Alabama A&M University.

 

Requirements for a Major in Physics Leading to the B.S. Degree

A total of fifty-five (55) credits as follows:

  1. Physics 111-112 (or 109-110 with departmental approval), 113L-114L.
  2. Physics 211, 213.
  3. Physics 250.
  4. Physics 301, 305, 401, and 406.
  5. Physics 486.
  6. At least 4 additional Physics credits at the 300-level or above.
  7. Mathematics 121, 122, 251, and 223 or appropriate substitutes as approved by the Physics Department. It is recommended that these courses be taken in the first two years.

Students planning to pursue graduate study in physics are strongly encouraged to take as many upper elective physics courses as possible. Mathematics 261, 370 and Computer Science 141 also are recommended.

Students planning to pursue dual degree or graduate study in engineering should consult with Professor Elizabeth Young who serves as the pre-engineering advisor.

Physics majors are encouraged to consider study abroad opportunities, and should consult with their academic advisor about suitable options.

Requirements for a Minor in Physics

A total of twenty-four (24) credits as follows:

  1. Physics 111-112 (or 109-110 with departmental approval), 113L-114L.
  2. Physics 211. Note: Physics 213 is not required.
  3. At least one additional 4-credit Physics course at the 200-level or above.
  4. Mathematics 121, 122. Mathematics 223 is recommended, but not required. 
    Note: Mathematics 223 is a prerequisite for many upper level physics courses.

Political Science

The Department of Political Science prepares students to address fundamental questions of equality, liberty, and justice; the history of political philosophy; the constitutional structure of government in the U.S., and the major institutions of national politics, urban politics, and public policy. 

For Students Considering a Career in Law

Political Science is an especially good major for those interested in a career in law. The American Bar Association identifies a set of skills and bodies of knowledge that students considering a career in law should develop through their undergraduate education, and the Political Science major concentrates on all of these to a very high degree. These core skills and values include "analytic and problem-solving skills," "critical reading abilities," "writing skills," "oral communication and listening abilities," and "general research skills," among others.* The Political Science curriculum will involve you repeatedly in academic work that hones each of these, and covers areas of knowledge the ABA considers important preparation for law school: a comprehension of the contemporary American political and legal systems; political development of the United States; the fundamental principles of political thought; a basic understanding of human behavior and social interaction; and the ability to organize, manage, and analyze data in the process of conducting research. Law-related internships or co-curricular activities may also be appropriate.

*www.Americanbar.org/groups/legal_education/resources/pre_law

Honors in Political Science

Honors work in Political Science affords an opportunity for Political Science majors to investigate topics of their own choosing. In the process, they will be expanding and honing their research and writing skills, which is excellent preparation for graduate and professional degree work. Majors pursuing honors will devote a substantial portion of their last two semesters at Rhodes to their projects (honors work earns eight-twelve credits across two semesters). To be eligible, a student must have completed 28 credits of course work in the major and have a grade point average of 3.5 or higher in the college and in Political Science courses. Honors guidelines are available from the chairperson of the department.

Political Science: Faculty and Staff

Professors

Daniel E. Cullen. 1988. M.A., Dalhousie University; Ph.D., Boston College. (History of political philosophy; American political thought; contemporary political theory.)
Michael Nelson. 1991. Fulmer Professor of Political Science. B.A., College of William and Mary; M.A. and Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University. (American Presidency; Southern Politics; American politics.)
Marcus D. Pohlmann. 1986. B.A., Cornell College; M.A., M.Phil. and Ph.D., Columbia University. (American politics; legal studies; education policy, black political thought.)

Associate Professors

Amy E. Jasperson. 2012. Chair. B.A. Wellesley College; Ph.D., University of Minnesota. (American politics; political communication; political psychology; political campaigns.)
Stephen H. Wirls. 1994. B.A., Kenyon College; M.A. and Ph. D., Cornell University. (American politics; Congress; American political thought; modern political philosophy.)

Assistant Professors

Keith C. Gibson. 2014. B.A., Princeton University; Ph.D., University of Michigan (Urban politics, political participation and political behavior, research methodology and public policy)
Renee J. Johnson. 2013. B.A., Lawrence University; M.A. and Ph.D., Stony Brook University. (Political economy/public policy; methodology; American Politics.)

Post Doctoral Fellow in Political Science

Erin A. Dolgoy. 2013. M.A. and Ph.D., Michigan State University. (Political theory, science and technology studies, American politics.)

Director of Mock Trial

Anna R. Smith. 2012. B.A., Rhodes College; J.D. Duke University. (Legal studies; internships.)

Staff

Jacqueline Baker. 2010. Departmental Assistant.

Requirements for a Major in Political Science

A total of forty-eight (48) credits as follows:

  1. Political Science 151: U. S. Politics.
  2. Political Science 270: Research Methods.
  3. Political Science 485: Senior Seminar.
  4. One course of the following courses in political thought and philosophy: 212, 214, 216, 218, 230, 311, 314, Humanities 201 (Politics Track.)
  5. International Studies 110 or International Studies 120.
  6. Seven additional courses (28 credits) in Political Science, two of which must be at the 300 level. Political Science 460, Public Affairs Internship, may count as a major elective at the 200 level.

POLS 262, 263 and 264 do not count toward a major in Political Science.

Requirements for a Minor in Political Science

A total of five courses or twenty (20) credits as follows:

  1. Political Science 151: U. S. Politics.
  2. Two courses at the 200-level. Humanities 201 (Politics Track) may count for a 200 level course.
  3. Two courses at the 300-level or above.

POLS 460, Public Affairs Internship, does not count as a course for the minor in Political Science.

POLS 262, 263 and 264 do not count toward a minor in Political Science.

The Washington Semester and the Capitol Semester

Political Science students may participate in two different semester long programs in Washington, D.C., each involving courses, an internship, and a research project. Since special financial arrangements are required for these programs, students need to meet with the Director of the Buckman Center. These programs can be done in the Fall or the Spring semester. Two of the four courses transferred from the Washington Semester may satisfy requirements for a Political Science major, and all four of the courses transferred from the Capitol Semester may satisfy requirements for a Political Science major. Since some coursework transfers as internship credit, students receiving credit from either of these programs cannot count an additional Political Science 460 course toward the Political Science major.

Psychology

The Department of Psychology helps students develop an understanding of human behavior and experience a variety of theoretical perspectives. The faculty specialize in a wide variety of topics, including physiological, clinical, health, cognitive, social, developmental psychology, and education. 

Honors in Psychology

Members of the faculty of the Department of Psychology encourage students of exceptional academic accomplishment to pursue research with a departmental faculty sponsor that is of an in-depth, rigorous nature; this work will introduce the student to the quality of research one would normally experience in a graduate program. Because the level of involvement of the student and his or her faculty sponsor will be greater in Honors research than that in either a Tutorial or Directed Inquiry, the faculty of the Department of Psychology have established rules for student admission into the Departmental Honors Program. The policies are described on the department website. It is recommended that students interested in pursuing department honors enroll in Junior Seminar 399.

Major Essay

When declaring a major in psychology, students must submit an essay in which they articulate their educational goals. The essay should be four paragraphs, with one paragraph dedicated to each of the questions below (question 3 has two parts.)

  1. In your opinion, what are the defining characteristics of the discipline of Psychology?
  2. How do the requirements for the Psychology major complement your program of liberal arts study and support your career or life goals?
  3. As a Psychology major, how will you (a) build on your strengths and (b) address your weaknesses?

The entire essay should be between 250 and 1000 words and must accompany the Declaration of Major form when a student has the initial meeting with her/his major advisor. A student may choose to revise the essay after meeting with the advisor. Students will electronically submit the final, advisor approved, version of the essay as a Word document to the psychology departmental assistant so that it can be archived. The file name for the essay should be as follows: student’s last name, student’s first name, and graduation year. Each student will revisit the major essay in the senior seminar course.

Psychology: Faculty and Staff

Professors

Natalie K. Person. 1994. Chair. B.A., University of Mississippi; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Memphis. (Cognitive; learning technologies; educational psychology.)
Marsha D. Walton. 1979. B.A., M.A., and Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. (Developmental; narrative and social interaction.)

Associate Professors

Anita A. Davis. 1996. B.A., Rhodes College; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. (Clinical; community; interventions with minority populations; adolescent motherhood.)
Kimberly M. Gerecke. 2006. B.S., Muskingum College; M.S., University of Richmond. Ph.D. University of Alabama at Birmingham. (Neuroscience; exercise and neurodegeneration.)
Elizabeth Thomas. 2011. B.A., Georgetown University, Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. (Urban Studies; community psychology; psychology and the arts.)
Christopher G. Wetzel. 1982. B.A., M.A., and Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. (Social; social cognition; prejudice.)
Matthew Weeks. 2015. B.A. Kentucky Wesleyan College; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Memphis. (Social; social cognition; stereotyping.)
Katherine White. 2009. B.A., Rhodes College; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Florida. (Cognitive and sensory processing; cognitive aging.)

Assistant Professors

Jonathan Cook. 2013. B.S., Andrews University; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Missouri. (Clinical; stigma and mental illness; media portrayal of mental illness.)
Erin Cue. 2016. B.S., Vanderbilt University; M.A. and Ph.D., University of California in Los Angeles. (Educational psychology; African-American achievement and motivation.)
Jason Haberman. 2014. B.A., University of Miami; M.A. and Ph.D., University of California - Davis. (Neuroscience: visual psychophysics; object recognition, ensemble perception.)
Jamie Jirout. 2014. B.A., Colgate University; Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University. (Educational psychology: scientific curiosity and persistence; spatial processing.)
Rebecca Klatzkin. 2011. B.S., University of Richmond; M.A., and Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. (Behavioral neuroscience: stress; eating behavior; binge eating disorder.)
Geoffrey Maddox. 2013. B.A., University of Missouri; M.A., and Ph.D., Washington University, St. Louis. (Cognitive: Aging and development.)
Ry Testa. 2015. B.A., Tufts University; M.A., and Ph.D., Temple University. (Clinical: Mental and medical health disparities in marginalized communities.)

Staff

Christy Waldkirch. Departmental Assistant.

Requirements for a Major in Psychology

A total of 11 courses or forty-four (44) credits in the major as follows: 

  1. Psychology 150 to be taken as early as possible in the student’s course of study.
  2. Psychology 200 and 211 should be taken as early as possible. Ideally they should be completed by the spring semester of the sophomore year.
  3. At least one course from each of the following four content domains (At least two of these courses must be core courses (underlined) from separate domains): 
    1. Developmental: Psychology 229, 230, 231; 
    2. Cognition and Learning: Psychology 306, 326, 327; Education 300 
    3. Biological: Psychology 216, 220, 270
    4. Sociocultural: Psychology 232, 250, 280, 323; Urban Studies 250. 
  4. One advanced methods course from among Psychology 350 – 352 that should be taken junior year. Before taking a particular advanced methods course, students should complete the core course that relates to it.
  5. One community-based or independent investigation course: Psychology 229 (some sections), 231, 250, 338, 451, 452, 460, 495, or 496; Education  360 or 460.
  6. One other course in psychology (only one 105 course may count). 
  7. Psychology 485 to be taken during the senior year.

 

Requirements for a Minor in Psychology

A total of 6 courses or twenty-four (24) credits as follows:

  1. Psychology 150.
  2. Psychology 200.
  3. Four additional psychology courses to be chosen in consultation with a departmental advisor and to be approved by the department chair. These will be selected to coordinate with the student’s major and career aspirations, and will normally include at least one 300- or 400-level course. Only one 105 course may count.

Religious Studies

The Department of Religious Studies promotes the academic study of religion by offering courses that explore the diverse aspects of religious traditions. Particular emphasis is given to the origins, history, and relevance of religion in contemporary life.

 

Honors in Religious Studies

Honors research in Religious Studies is established by consultation between the student and the department. In addition to the courses required for a major, the honors program requires the one-hour junior honors tutorial, Religious Studies 399, and the senior honors tutorials, Religious Studies 495-496, in which the student will be guided in the research and writing of an honors paper.

Religious Studies: Faculty and Staff

Professors

Stephen R. Haynes. 1989. The Albert Bruce Curry Professor of Religious Studies. B.A., Vanderbilt University; M.A., Florida State University; M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Emory University. (Holocaust studies; religion and politics; religion and literature; religion and education.)
Steven L. McKenzie. 1983. The Spence L. Wilson Senior Research Fellow. B.A., M.Div., Abilene Christian University; Th.D., Harvard University. (Old Testament; Hebrew.)
Milton C. Moreland. 2003. B.A., University of Memphis; M.A. and Ph.D., Claremont Graduate University (Archaeology; New Testament; Christian origins; historiography.)

Associate Professors

Thomas Bremer. 2001.The R. A. Webb Professor of Religious Studies. B.A., The Ohio State University; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton University. (History of religion in America.)
Patrick Gray. 2002. B.A., Oglethorpe University; M.T.S., Ph.D., Emory University. (New Testament; history of biblical interpretation; Greco-Roman moral philosophy.)
Kendra G. Hotz. 2006. B.A., University of Evansville; M.Div., Candler School of Theology, Emory University; Ph.D., Emory University. (Christian theology.)
Luther D. Ivory. 1997. B.A., University of Tennessee; M.S., University of Arkansas; D.Min., Union Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Emory University. (African-American religion and ethics; civil rights movement.)
John C. Kaltner. Chair. 1996. The Virginia Ballou McGehee Professor of Muslim-Christian Relations. B.A., State University of New York at Oswego; M.A., Maryknoll School of Theology; S.S.L., Pontifical Biblical Institute; Ph.D., Drew University. (Biblical studies; Islam.)
Bernadette McNary-Zak. 1999. B.A., University of Rochester; M.A., Catholic University of America; Ph.D., University of Toronto. (Early Christianity.)
Mark W. Muesse. 1988. B.A., Baylor University; M.T.S., A.M., and Ph.D., Harvard University. (Theology; world religions.)
Daniel Ullucci. 2011. W.J. Millard Professorship in Religious Studies B.S., Boston University; M.A., Ph.D. Brown University. (Early Christianity; ancient Mediterranean religion.)

Assistant Professors

Rhiannon Graybill. 2012. B.A., Swarthmore College; M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley. (Hebrew Bible; gender and sexuality.)

Visiting Assistant Professors

Sarah E. Rollens. 2015. B.A., University of North Carolina at Wilmington; M.A., University of Alberta; Ph.D., University of Toronto (New Testatment, Early Christianity)

Part-Time Faculty

Harry K. Danziger. B.A., University of Cincinnati; M.A. and Ordination, Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion. (Judaism.) Supported in part by the Jewish Chautauqua Society.
R. Craig Jordan. B.A., Greensboro College; M.Div. and D. Min., Vanderbilt University; M.S., University of Memphis. (Pastoral care and counseling; bioethics; death and dying.) 
Yasir Kazi. B.Sc.University of Houston; B.A. and M.A., University of Saudi Arabia; M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D. Yale University. (Islamic studies.)

Staff

Stephanie Cage. Departmental Assistant.

Requirements for a Major in Religious Studies

A total of thirty-six (36) credits as follows:

  1. Religious Studies 255, 256; 251, 253 or 258.
  2. One 200-level course in Bible (260, 270-277, 280-286).
  3. One 200-level course in theology and ethics (211, 220, 232, 233). The Religion track of HUM 201 can count toward this requirement.
  4. Three 300-level courses. (Religious Studies 399, the Junior Honors Tutorial, does not count towards fulfilling this requirement.)
  5. Religious Studies 485 (Religious Studies 256 and at least one 300-level course must be completed prior to taking Religious Studies 485.)

Note: The Health Equity Internships (Religious Studies 460) may count toward fulfilling the third requirement for the Religious Studies major.

Requirements for a Minor in Religious Studies

A total of twenty (20) credits as follows:

  1. Religious Studies 101 and 102 or Humanities 101 and 102.
  2. Two 200-level courses in different areas of Religious Studies (biblical studies, theology and ethics, history of religions). Certain courses (e.g., Humanities 201 or GRS 250) can fulfill this requirement when cross-listed as Religious Studies courses.
  3. One 300-level Religious Studies seminar in any area.

Note: The Health Equity Internships (Religious Studies 460) may count toward fulfilling the second requirement for the Religious Studies minor.

Reserve Officer Training Programs

Rhodes, in cooperation with the University of Memphis and the Departments of the Army, Navy, and Air Force, participates in crosstown agreements that provide the opportunity for Rhodes students to enroll in Aerospace Studies (Air Force ROTC), Military Science (Army ROTC), and Naval Science (Navy ROTC) at The University of Memphis. Upon successful completion of the reserve officer training programs and the undergraduate degree at Rhodes, a student receives a commission as a second lieutenant in the appropriate military service.

The curriculum for the ROTC program is reviewed by the Faculty of Rhodes and the appropriate credits are assigned. The student who participates in the ROTC programs will have to complete all requirements as specified by the military service departments, including summer training camps, if the commission as an officer is to be granted.

A Rhodes student may earn a maximum of sixteen credits in the ROTC programs and apply fourteen of these credits to the 128 credits needed for a Rhodes degree. In addition, for each course completed in the ROTC program, the student will receive credit for one of the three half-semester courses in Physical Education that are required for graduation. Credit earned in ROTC is counted as elective credit, and it is listed on the student’s transcript as ROTC credit with the appropriate course titles. Credits enrolled in during a given semester are included in the count of credits for a normal course load. (The credit shown below applies to the 16-credit provision.) Although a student takes the ROTC courses at The University of Memphis, that student is a full-time student at Rhodes, and any financial assistance provided by the military services is based on tuition and fees at Rhodes.

Aerospace Studies

The Aerospace Studies program is in two parts. The first-year/sophomore-level program, the General Military Course, is open to all students. The junior/senior level program, the Professional Officer Course, is available only to selected, eligible students who desire to earn commissions as officers in the United States Air Force while pursuing their academic studies at Rhodes. Participants in the POC program and those in the GMC on AFROTC scholarships receive a monthly subsistence allowance from the Air Force. Graduate students who qualify are also eligible for POC enrollment.

Air Force ROTC scholarships which pay all or a portion of certain college costs (tuition, book allowance, and certain fees) are available on a competitive basis, to entering first-year students and to cadets participating in the AFROTC program. Details are available from the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid or from the Department of Aerospace Studies at the University of Memphis. Students wishing to participate should contact the Unit Admissions Officer, AFROTC Detachment 785, Department of Aerospace Studies, University of Memphis, at 678-2681. Students may also access AFROTC Detachment 785’s website at www.afrotc.memphis.edu and/or the AFROTC website at www.afrotc.com.

Rhodes Study Abroad Programs

European Studies

European Studies is a sixteen-week program offered jointly by Rhodes and The University of the South (Sewanee) that takes place from mid summer through early Fall. It is a full semester of study abroad and offers the unique experience of studying in a variety of locations in Europe in a special and quite different learning environment. The program begins in July with three weeks of study at The University of the South with Rhodes and Sewanee faculty. The students then travel to England where there is a seven day practicum of archaeology and field work conducted by British tutors at York and the University of Durham, followed by six weeks with British and European instructors at Lincoln College, Oxford. The program closes with five weeks of travel in Western Europe, accompanied by British tutors in Art History.
European Studies offers two academic options or “tracks.” The first track, “Ancient Greece and Rome: The Foundations of Western Civilization,” is a comprehensive study of the thinking and achievement of Ancient Greece and Rome and their importance to Western Civilization. The second track, “Western Europe in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance,” is an integrated cultural portrait of Western Europe in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. They both provide a highly enjoyable experience of other cultures and other academic methods that enriches study back on the Rhodes campus. The experience culminates with extensive, student-authored academic journals that integrate what has been learned in the five weeks of study and travel.

Students in the European Studies program pay their tuition and fees to Rhodes and receive need-based financial aid as granted by Rhodes. Aid is limited to the amount that would be granted in support of a semester’s study at Rhodes. The credits are applied directly to degree requirements and are factored into the Rhodes grade point average.

This curriculum will be offered for the Fall 2014 European Studies program. A total of 18 credits is earned for the successful completion of this program. Courses are approved as meeting major, general or foundational degree requirements in the appropriate department or division as noted. Since courses are developed annually, some variation in topics may occur from year to year although the departments and general fields of study remain constant.

Theatre

LysistrataThe Department of Theatre offers courses that develop students’ analytic, performance, and production skills.  Students pursuing a major or a minor in theatre study theatre history, performance theory, acting, and design, and have opportunities to study directing, voice and movement, dramatic literature, and theatrical performance across cultures.

The McCoy Theatre, which opened in 1982, operates under the direction of the Department of Theatre.  The McCoy Theatre mounts formal productions and hosts several other performances each year, including staged readings, one-acts, and performances and workshops of guest artists.  Productions from past seasons include Nicholas Nickleby, J.B., and Dancing at Lughnasa. Productions also frequently include work originally conceived and developed at Rhodes. The McCoy Theatre regularly produces Shakespeare.  Recent Shakespeare productions include Hamlet, The Tempest, and Twelfth Night.  The McCoy Theatre occasionally produces musicals, which, in the past, have included Candide and Urinetown.

The Department of Theatre provides opportunities for all students to be involved with theatrical performances on campus.  The department's courses are open to the student body, and the McCoy Theatre's formal productions offer students in all disciplines opportunities to act, design, manage, and build.

Honors in Theatre

Detailed information about graduating with Honors in Theatre is available from the department. All Honors candidates must meet the College’s eligibility criteria established for the Honors Program. Only students with a minimum overall GPA of 3.5 and a GPA within the major of 3.7 by the end of the fall semester of their junior year will be eligible to pursue honors. In addition to fulfilling the requirements for the major, students seeking honors will be expected to complete the following additional work:

  1. The one-credit Honors Tutorial, Theatre 399, in spring of the junior year: in consultation with an appropriate member of the Theatre faculty, the Honors candidate must write a proposal for Honors work, positing a substantial Honors thesis or creative project that demonstrates an exceptional understanding of the area(s) studied, to be implemented in the senior year. The department must approve the proposal.
  2. The Senior Honors Tutorials, Theatre 495-496, in fall and spring of the senior year. An overall grade of A- on the thesis or project itself is required for Honors credit.

Requirements for a Major in Theatre

A total of forty-eight (48) credits as follows:

1. Theatre 100: Introduction to Theatre
2. Theatre 120: Acting I
3. Theatre 220: Production Technologies
4. Theatre 222: Scenic Design
5. Theatre 221: Acting II
6. Theatre 270: Performance Theory
7. Dramatic Literature Course
8. Theatre 301: Theatre Lab
9. Theatre 485: Senior Seminar
10. 4 Applied Credits
11. Two Theatre courses, at the 300+ level, from 2 of the following groups of courses:
• Directing-Performing
• History-Theory-Literature
• Design-Technology

 

Requirements for a Minor in Theatre

A total of twenty-four (24) credits as follows:

  1. Theatre 100
  2. Theatre 120 or 122
  3. Theatre 220
  4. Theatre 270
  5. Theatre 301
  6. 4 Applied Credits

Theatre: Faculty and Staff

Professors

Julia Ewing. 1976. Artistic Director, McCoy Theatre. B.A., Siena College; M.A., University of Memphis. (Acting; directing; stage movement.)
David Jilg. 1994. B.A., Rhodes College; M.F.A., Tulane University. (Production design; costume design; Spanish-American drama; gender studies.)

Associate Professors

Laura Canon. 1994. Distinguished Service Associate Professor. Technical Director and Production Manager, McCoy Theatre. B.A., Rhodes College; M.F.A., University of Memphis. (Lighting design; scene design.)
David Mason. 2004. Chair. B.A.; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison. (Theatre history; theory; dramatic literature.)

Assistant Professors

Joy Brooke Fairfield. 2016. B.A., Harvard; M.A., New York University; Ph.D., Stanford. (Acting; directing.)

Part-Time Instructors

Bradley Harris. 2015. B.A., University of Calgary; M.F.A., University of Memphis; J.D., University of Calgary. (Public speaking.)

Managing Director, McCoy Theatre

Kevin Collier. 2006. B.A., Rhodes College.