Rhodes College Catalogue

General Information

The Rhodes Vision

Rhodes College aspires to graduate students with a life-long passion for learning, a compassion for others, and the ability to translate academic study and personal concern into effective leadership and action in their communities and the world. We will achieve our aspiration through four strategic imperatives:

  1. Student Access 
    To attract and retain a talented, diverse student body and engage these students in a challenging, inclusive and culturally-broadening college experience.
  2. Student Learning
    To ensure our faculty and staff have the talent, the time and the resources to inspire and involve our students in meaningful study, research and service.
  3. Student Engagement
    To enhance student opportunities for learning in Memphis.
  4. Student Inspiration
    To provide a residential place of learning that inspires integrity and high achievement through its beauty, its emphasis on values, its Presbyterian history, and its heritage as a leader in the liberal arts and sciences.

Rhodes College’s Commitment to Diversity

A diverse learning community is a necessary element of a liberal arts education, for self-understanding is dependent upon the understanding of others. We, the members of Rhodes College, are committed to fostering a community in which diversity is valued and welcomed. To that end, Rhodes College does not discriminate – and will not tolerate harassment – on the basis of race, gender, color, age, religion, disability, sexual orientation, gender identity or expression, genetic information, and national or ethnic origin.

We are committed to providing an open learning environment. Freedom of thought, a civil exchange of ideas, and an appreciation of diverse perspectives are fundamental characteristics of a community that is committed to critical inquiry. To promote such an academic and social environment we expect integrity and honesty in our relationships with each other and openness to learning about and experiencing cultural diversity. We believe that these qualities are crucial to fostering social and intellectual maturity and personal growth.

Intellectual maturity also requires individual struggle with unfamiliar ideas. We recognize that our views and convictions will be challenged, and we expect this challenge to take place in a climate of open-mindedness and mutual respect.

Revised February 13, 2015

Accreditation and General Policies

Rhodes College is an accredited four-year college of liberal arts and sciences. With an endowment of $318 million and a physical plant valued at $466 million, the College has one of the largest investments per student ($386,000) in the nation.

Rhodes College is accredited by the Southern Association of Colleges and Schools – Commission on Colleges (SACS COC) and all potential substantive changes--whether proposed by students, faculty, staff, or Board of Trustees-- must be discussed with and reviewed by the SACS COC Accreditation Liaison, who is appointed by the Rhodes College President. It is the responsibility of the SACS COC Accreditation Liaison to ensure that potential substantive changes are reported to, and approved by the SACS COC, prior to implementation.

The purpose of this Policy and Procedures document is to comply with the Substantive Change for Accredited Institutions of the Commission on Colleges, Policy Statement, Institutional Obligations, Item #2, that “Member institutions are required to have a policy and procedure to ensure that all substantive changes are reported to the Commission in a timely fashion” (p. 1).

What Is a Substantive Change?

Substantive change is a significant modification or expansion in the nature and scope of an accredited institution. Under federal regulations, substantive change includes:

  • Any change in the established mission or objectives of the institution
  • Any change in legal status, form of control, or ownership of the institution
  • The addition of courses or programs that represent a significant departure, either in content or method of delivery, from those that were offered when the institution was last evaluated
  • The addition of courses or programs of study at a degree or credential level different from that which is included in the institution’s current accreditation or reaffirmation.
  • A change from clock hours to credit hours
  • A substantial increase in the number of clock or credit hours awarded for successful completion of a program
  • The establishment of an additional location geographically apart from the main campus at which the institution offers at least 50 percent of an educational program.
  • The establishment of a branch campus
  • Closing a program, off-campus site, branch campus or institution
  • Entering into a collaborative academic arrangement that includes only the initiation of a dual degree program or a joint degree program with another institution
  • Acquiring another institution or a program or location of another institution
  • Adding a permanent location at a site where the institution is conducting a teach-out program for a closed institution
  • Entering into a contract by which an entity not eligible for Title IV funding offers 25% or more of one or more of the accredited institution’s programs

What Are the Procedures for Reporting Substantive Change?

SACS COC has identified three procedures for addressing the different types of substantive changes. These include:

Procedure One – for the review of substantive changes requiring notification and approval prior to implementation,

Procedure Two – for the review of substantive changes requiring only notification prior to implementation, and

Procedure Three – for closing a program, site, branch campus or institution.

The different types of substantive change, the specific procedure to be used for each, their respective approval notification requirements, and their reporting time lines are included in the document “Substantive Change for Accredited Institutions of the Commission on Colleges - Policy Statement” located on pages 6-9 at: www.sacscoc.org/pdf/081705/Substantive%20change%20policy.pdf.

Procedures for the institutional changes such as mergers, acquiring or adding programs, or changes in governance or legal status can be found in a separate document, “Mergers, Consolidations, Change of Ownership, Acquisitions, and Change of Governance, Control, Form, or Legal Status.” at:

www.sacscoc.org/subchg/policy/Mergers.pdf.

The initiation or revision of programs not offered for academic credit and that are not eligible for federal financial aid does not require reporting: however, such programs are subject to review at the time of reaffirmation.

Identifying and reporting substantive change

The President is responsible for:

  • Submitting substantive change notification letters and associated documentation to the President of the SACS COC and providing a copy of the letters and documentation to the Accreditation Liaison

or

  • Designating the Accreditation Liaison as his representative to submit substantive change notification letters and associated documentation to the President of the SACS COC

The President and Vice Presidents are responsible for:

  • Informing relevant personnel under their supervision about the existence of the SACS COC Policy on Substantive Change and the need to check with the Accreditation Liaison regarding any and all significant changes in policy to determine if they meet the criteria for a substantive change as defined in the policy
  • Consulting with the College’s SACS COC Accreditation Liaison regarding questions about substantive changes within their divisions
  • Providing sufficient time to notify the SACS COC prior to the implementation of any changes
  • Assisting with the writing of appropriate documentation and notification of substantive changes as needed by the SACS COC

The SACS COC Accreditation Liaison is appointed by the President and is responsible for:

  • Staying up to date with the SACS COC Substantive Change Policy Statement
  • Serving as the contact person and communication liaison between SACS COC staff and the College regarding substantive change matters
  • Meeting with the President and Vice Presidents yearly to review the policy and planned initiatives
  • Working with the appropriate Vice President to develop a plan of action and timeline for any substantive change actions requiring approval from the SACS COC
  • Preparing substantive change prospectus in collaboration with the appropriate administrators and faculty
  • Submitting substantive change notification letters and associated documentation to the President of the SACS COC as requested by the President
  • Maintaining a database of substantive changes, initiatives, action plans and their status

Attendance at Rhodes, a privately endowed college, is a privilege which may be forfeited at any time by any student who refuses or fails to conform to the regulations and standards of the College, or who is unwilling to adjust to the College’s traditions and environment. Among these traditions are the Honor System and the Social Regulations Council that are administered by students and are described elsewhere in the catalogue. Certain offenses and violations of College rules are considered serious enough to merit suspension or expulsion. Additionally, the College reserves the right to suspend or expel any student, if, in the sole discretion of the administration, such suspension or expulsion is necessary to protect the best interests or welfare of the College, including the health and well-being of other students, faculty, or staff.
Rhodes welcomes applications for admission from all persons and does not discriminate on the basis of gender, race, color, age, religion, disability, sexual orientation, or national and ethnic origin in its admissions policies, loan programs, or other college educational programs, policies and activities. In compliance with section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990, Rhodes will make every reasonable effort to accommodate the needs of its students with disabilities.

The information, policies, and procedures listed in this catalogue are current and up-to-date as of March 1, 2013. Policies stated in this catalogue are expected to be in effect through the academic year 2013-2014 but are subject to revision. Normally, policy revisions are implemented in the next academic year, following notice thereof and are effective for all students who graduate in or after that academic year. However, occasionally a policy must be changed and implemented in the same academic year. In such cases, written notification of the revision will be mailed to all students currently enrolled.
The faculty of Rhodes College has the authority and the responsibility for establishing and maintaining those policies and procedures governing the academic standing of students at the College. Any deviation from the policies and procedures stated in this catalogue relating to academic standing requires the prior formal approval of the faculty. A compendium of all current policies and procedures in regard to the College is maintained in the office of the President.

Admission

Application Procedure

A student who wishes to apply for admission to Rhodes may do so any time after the end of his/her junior year in high school. Students may apply using the Common Application (www.commonapp.org). No application fee is required for first-year or transfer students.

Admission to Rhodes is competitive.

In addition to the application for admission, first-year students must submit an official high school transcript, standardized test scores (SAT or ACT), a secondary school report, a teacher evaluation, and a midyear report. In addition to submitting the same application supporting documents as all other first-year students, home-schooled students must submit the results of two SAT Subject Tests from areas other than English or mathematics. The deadlines for submitting the application for admission and all supporting documents are referenced in the following Early Decision Plans, Early Action Plan, and Regular Decision Plan sections. Please note that all accepted students are automatically considered for competitive scholarships and fellowships. Transcripts and other documents required for admission become part of the permanent file of an enrolled student and cannot be returned or legally copied for the student or parent.

The College is a member of the National Association for College Admission Counseling (NACAC) and endorses the principles contained in the Association’s Statement of Principles of Good Practice.

Admission Selection Process

Academic Record. A student’s academic record is of primary importance in the admission selection process. Applicants must complete in high school sixteen or more academic units, including at least four years of English, two years of the same foreign language (classical or modern), two years of laboratory science and two years of history or social science. Furthermore, applicants are expected to have completed the mathematics course sequence Algebra I, Geometry, and Algebra II or their equivalent. A fourth year of high school mathematics, including trigonometry and advanced algebra is especially important for students who plan to study mathematics, natural science, computer science, economics or business administration. Students with slightly different high school curricula may be considered only if their records in other respects clearly indicate readiness for Rhodes’ program of study. Applicants are expected to be in the process of receiving a high school diploma or G.E.D.

Special note is taken in the decision making process of honors, Advanced Placement, International Baccalaureate, Option International Baccalaureate, accelerated or enriched courses. Students who have taken college-level courses and wish to receive credit at Rhodes for those courses should refer to “Transfer Credit” in the Requirements for a Degree section of this catalogue.

Standardized Test Scores. All applicants for admission to the entering class are required to take either the SAT or the ACT. It is advisable for the student to take the test in the junior year as a means of adjusting to this type of examination or for Early Decision, Early Action or Early Admission purposes. Any student applying for Regular Decision should take the test no later than December of the senior year so that their scores will be available to the admission staff by January 15. If the secondary school record does not include the student’s scores from the SAT or ACT, the student must have the scores sent to the Office of Admission from the testing agency.

Test application forms may be obtained from high schools or by registering for them online at www.collegeboard.org (SAT) or www.act.org (ACT). Supporting Documents. Additional supporting documents will be considered when deciding on a student’s admissibility to the College. These documents include a listing of extracurricular involvements, leadership positions or summer experiences, short-answer questions, an application essay, a secondary school report, and a teacher’s evaluation.

Student Interest. A visit to the Rhodes campus (in addition to other demonstrations of interest) can be a deciding factor in making an admission decision. Interest may also be demonstrated by meeting with an admission officer locally or personally corresponding with the admission office. A student’s ability to pay may be a deciding factor when considering applicants who rank within the lowest range of admissible students.

The Dean of Admission has the discretion to deny any student admission to Rhodes College.

Students who wish to appeal their admission decision may do so by writing to the Dean of Admission requesting reconsideration.

Campus Visit and Personal Meeting

A campus visit is the best way to experience life at Rhodes. Students are encouraged to visit between Monday and Friday so that, in addition to a personal meeting with an admission representative or information session and a campus tour, they may attend a class and meet faculty (during the academic year). High school seniors and transfer students may also arrange, through the Office of Admission, to spend one night in a residence hall.

While on campus, students may participate in an information session or have a personal meeting with an admission representative. The Office of Admission is open year round from 8:30 am to 5:00 pm Monday through Friday and on select Saturdays.

Students may arrange a campus visit online at www.rhodes.edu/visit. Questions concerning a campus visit may be addressed to our Campus Visit Coordinator at 1-800-844-5969 or, locally, 901-843-3700.

Early Decision Plans

Students who are certain they want to attend Rhodes may wish to take advantage of either Early Decision I (ED I) or Early Decision II (ED II). Under these plans, the student must submit an application for admission, high school transcript (including grades for the first marking period of the senior year), letters of recommendation, standardized test scores and the Early Decision Agreement form by November 1 for Early Decision I or January 1 for Early Decision II. The student may apply to other colleges, but not under any other Early Decision Plan. If accepted and provided an adequate financial assistance, the applicant agrees to withdraw all applications submitted to other institutions, file no additional applications, and enroll at Rhodes.

Early Decision candidates who wish to be considered for need-based financial aid must complete and submit the College Scholarship Service’s PROFILE to the Financial Aid Office by November 1 for Early Decision I and January 1 for Early Decision II in order to determine eligibility for non-federal financial assistance and estimated eligibility for federal financial assistance. The financial aid package offered under Early Decision must be verified by filing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by March 1. This will determine actual eligibility for federal financial assistance.

Under the Early Decision Plans, the College agrees to render a decision on admission by December 1 for Early Decision I and February 1 for Early Decision II. Accepted students who are applying for need-based financial aid and have submitted the PROFILE will be contacted by the Financial Aid Office concerning their request by December 10 for Early Decision I and February 10 for Early Decision II.

Early Decision is a binding agreement, designed for students for whom Rhodes is their top college choice. If accepted under the Early Decision Plan (and provided with financial assistance considered adequate by the student), the applicant is expected to submit the required deposit (as explained under Enrollment Deposit) by December 15 for Early Decision I and February 15 for Early Decision II. Offers of admission and financial aid to accepted students who do not enroll at the college will be rescinded.

If a decision on the student’s application cannot be reached, the student will be notified that the application will be deferred and guaranteed unbiased consideration under Regular Decision.

Early Action Plan

Students who wish to know of their admission decision earlier in the year but are not prepared to make an enrollment decision prior to May 1 may wish to apply under our Early Action Plan. Early Action is an excellent option for students who are comfortable presenting their application earlier in the process.

Under this plan, the student must submit an application for admission, high school transcript, letters of recommendation, and standardized test scores by November 15.

Early Action candidates who wish to be considered for need-based financial aid must complete and submit the College Scholarship Service’s PROFILE to the Financial Aid Office by December 1 in order to determine eligibility for non-federal financial assistance and estimated eligibility for federal financial assistance. The financial aid package offered under Early Action must be verified by filing the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by March 1. This will determine actual eligibility for federal financial assistance.

Under the Early Action Plan, the admission staff will render an admission decision by January 15. Students will be notified of any scholarships or need-based aid they are eligible to receive by February 15. Admitted students have until May 1 to submit their enrollment deposit.

For various reasons, the Admission Committee may choose to defer a student’s application to Regular Decision. The student will be notified that the application will be deferred and reconsidered under Regular Decision.

Regular Decision Plan

Under this plan, students must submit an application for admission, high school transcript, letters of recommendation, and standardized test scores by January 15.

Regular Decision candidates who wish to be considered for non-federal need-based financial aid must complete and submit the College Scholarship Service’s PROFILE by February 1. Regular Decision candidates who wish to be considered for federal financial assistance must complete and submit the Free Application for Federal Student Aid (FAFSA) by March 1.

Under the Regular Decision Plan, the admission staff will render an admission decision by April 1. Students will be notified of any scholarships or need-based aid they are eligible to receive by April 15. Admitted students have until May 1 to submit their enrollment deposit.

Early Admission Plan

High school students who wish to enroll at Rhodes as degree-seeking students prior to completion of their secondary schooling may apply under the Early Admission Plan. This option is provided for those students who have demonstrated exceptional ability and motivation in secondary school and are ready to experience the challenges of a college education earlier than normal.

To be eligible for consideration, a student must submit an application for admission, a high school transcript including grades for five semesters of course work, a secondary school report, a teacher’s evaluation, SAT or ACT test scores, and have a personal meeting with an admission representative. Successful candidates will have satisfied Rhodes’ normal admission requirements, including the academic units requirements outlined under “Admission Selection Process” above. Normally it will be necessary for an Early Admission student to enroll at a local college or university in the summer prior to their enrollment at Rhodes in order to fulfill the College’s English unit’s requirement.

Early Admission students must normally have the support of their secondary school counselor and of their parents in order to be considered for admission under the plan.

Deferred Enrollment

Students who have been accepted for admission and wish to delay their enrollment at Rhodes for a semester or a year may request Deferred Enrollment by writing the Dean of Admission. The letter requesting Deferred Enrollment must indicate the length of time requested for deferral, the reason for requesting the deferral, and the proposed actions of the student during the time of the deferral. The Dean of Admission will respond to the deferral request in writing. If deferred enrollment is granted, the student must submit a nonrefundable $1,000.00 enrollment deposit to the Office of Admission. Students who have been accepted from the wait list are normally not offered deferred enrollment.

Accepted students requesting deferral who have been awarded one of the College’s competitive scholarships or fellowships may retain the award as long as its value is one-half Rhodes tuition or less. Scholarships or fellowships granted to accepted, deferred students that are valued at over one-half Rhodes tuition will not be retained by the students. In these cases, the students will be reconsidered for competitive scholarships/fellowships during the semester prior to their enrollment at the College.

Deferred students may not enroll in additional high school course work or in more than two college courses for credit in any one semester/term during their time of deferral. Doing so nullifies their admission and scholarship offers (if any) and requires new admission and scholarship decisions to be rendered. Students wishing to enroll in college courses are advised to consult with the Office of Admission to ensure credit will transfer to Rhodes.

Admission of Transfer Students

Rhodes welcomes applications from students who wish to transfer from other accredited colleges or universities. Students who have enrolled in more than two courses in any one semester or term at another college or university are considered transfer students. Students who have not graduated from high school, but have taken college course work, are not considered transfer students.

An applicant for admission as a transfer student should write or call the Office of Admission for an application or may go to www.commonapp.org to access the Common App online for transfer students. Applicants may also print the Common Application transfer packet available at www.commonapp.org. The student should have official transcripts from his or her secondary school and all postsecondary institutions attended sent directly to the Office of Admission. If the secondary school transcript does not include the student’s scores on the SAT or ACT, the student must have these sent to the Office of Admission from the testing agency. Transfer students must submit a college instructor evaluation, a college official’s report and a personal letter explaining the reason(s) for wanting to transfer to Rhodes. Transfer applicants applying for January entrance must also submit a Mid-Semester Grade Report (available on www.rhodes.edu) containing grade estimates from their professors. Admission and scholarship decisions are made in the context of both the secondary and post-secondary academic record. Prior college work is evaluated in light of Rhodes’ established degree requirements. Transfer students whose prior work is not compatible with a Rhodes degree program may find it necessary to extend their college career in order to complete all requirements for a degree.

Rhodes’ admission policy is to only consider applications for transfer from students who are in good standing at the last institution attended. Students under academic or disciplinary suspension are not encouraged to apply to Rhodes until eligible for readmission to the suspending institution.

Transfer from an unaccredited college requires a more thorough analysis of academic credentials. If accepted, the student will be placed on probationary status for one academic year and will be expected to maintain a record satisfactory to the Faculty Standards and Standing Committee. Transfer students coming from colleges not accredited by a regional accrediting agency may find the acceptance of transfer credit to be very limited.

For more information regarding the transfer of credit, see “Transfer Credit” in the Requirements for a Degree section of this catalogue.

Admission of International Students

Rhodes encourages international students living both abroad and in the United States to apply for admission. International students are those individuals who are not citizens or permanent residents (resident alien status) of the United States.

In addition to those documents required of all first-year or transfer students, international applicants must have the official results of the Test Of English as a Foreign Language (TOEFL) or International English Language Testing System (IELTS) forwarded to the Office of Admission from the appropriate testing agency. The TOEFL/IELTS exams are not required for native English-speaking students. All transcripts must include a certified English translation. International students who have studied at other colleges or universities must have official transcripts from those institutions sent to Rhodes.

All international applicants must submit the College Board’s International Student Certification of Finances which is required for issuance of a student visa from the United States government. International applicants may be eligible and competitive for merit-based scholarships ranging from US $6,000 to full tuition.

Rhodes meets the demonstrated financial need of international students. Need-based financial aid for international students (non-U.S. citizens) is determined from the international student CSS PROFILE or the College Board's International Student Financial Aid Application. Aid is awarded in the form of grants or "gift" aid, which varies in dollar amounts accoridng to each student's demonstrated financial need. International students may also be considered for on-campus student employment.

Admission of Special Students (Non-degree Candidates)

Applicants who give evidence of sufficient academic ability may be admitted as special students to a course of study not leading directly to a degree, but allowing them to pursue that work for which they are best prepared and/or which they particularly need. Special students may enroll in no more than two classes, or for no more than eight credits per semester. Special students who wish to audit classes are limited to taking one course per semester.

Special students are not eligible to live in the residence halls or participate in intercollegiate athletics, fraternity or sorority membership, or other extracurricular activities. In addition, special students are not eligible for any Rhodes or federal financial aid funds. Directed Inquiries are not ordinarily available to special students. Should a special student subsequently become a degree candidate, credits earned while a special student are applicable towards the degree sought.

The deadline for submission of a special student application, along with a $45.00 nonrefundable application fee and most recent transcript from high school or college, is two weeks prior to the beginning of a new semester/term.

Special student admission material is submitted only once. Students who have attended Rhodes as a special student and wish to continue their studies as a special student should report directly to the Registrar’s Office and register for classes during the first three days of a new semester/term.

Special students who have enrolled in two or more courses at another institution must reapply for special student status through the Office of Admission. A student seeking readmission as a special student will normally be held to the same academic standards as full-time, degree-seeking students at Rhodes.

Special students are held to the same standards of academic progress regarding academic probation and suspension as degree students.

Readmission of Students

Students who have voluntarily withdrawn from the College and have taken two courses or less in any one term at another institution, and students who have been academically suspended from Rhodes and wish to return, must apply for readmission through the Faculty Standards and Standing Committee.

Returning students, including students who have already graduated from Rhodes, must complete an Application for Readmission (obtained from the Registrar’s Office) which requests current information about the student, including an account of activities and educational experiences during the absence from Rhodes. In many cases interviews with the Dean of the Faculty and the Dean of Students will be necessary to complete the readmission process. Students seeking to be readmitted must initiate their requests at least two months prior to the beginning of a new semester.

Students who have voluntarily withdrawn from Rhodes and have taken more than two courses in any one term or semester at another institution are considered transfer students. These students must apply for readmission to Rhodes through the Office of Admission submitting the required applications and supporting documents.

Rhodes High School Scholars Program

Rhodes allows high school students who have demonstrated exceptional ability and motivation to begin their college work while completing their secondary school course of study. Such a student may enroll in up to two courses per semester at Rhodes.

To be eligible for the Rhodes High School Scholars Program, a student must complete an admission application; have scored at least 1140 on the SAT Critical Reading and Math tests or 25 on the ACT; rank in the upper one-fifth of his or her class; have a positive high school recommendation; and have a personal interview with an admission representative.

Course fees per credit hour are the same as Special Student tuition (see “Special Fees and Deposits” in the Expenses section). Financial aid is normally not available for students participating in the program. Participation in the High School Scholars Program will require coordination of the student’s college and high school course schedules. Rhodes’ Office of Admission will gladly assist the students, teachers, and counselors with these arrangements.

Advanced Placement

Rhodes will normally grant advanced placement and course credit to entering students who score either 4 or 5 on a College Board Advanced Placement examination. Students who score 3 on an Advanced Placement examination may enroll in advanced course work if the relevant department recommends it. A maximum of thirty-two (32) credits may be earned through Advanced Placement examinations. A maximum combined total of thirty-two (32) credits may be earned through Advanced Placement, Cambridge Pre-U, International Baccalaureate, and Option International Baccalaureate examinations.

Advanced Placement, Cambridge Pre-U, International Baccalaureate, and Option International Baccalaureate credit may not be used to satisfy Rhodes’ Foundation requirements except for scores in English and, in certain subjects, scores of 5 on AP exams, D3 or higher on Cambridge Pre-U exams, 6 or 7 on IB higher-level exams, and 16 or higher on Option International Baccalaureate exams. All students must take the Rhodes placement test in the appropriate language to determine proficiency and placement, including students who took an AP language exam in that language. For more information about Advanced Placement and International Baccalaureate credit, go to rhodes.edu/registrar/1330.asp.

Cambridge Pre-U, International Baccalaureate, and Option International Baccalaureate Degree Programs

Rhodes recognizes the Cambridge Pre-U, International Baccalaureate, and Option International Baccalaureate academic programs and welcomes for review the submission of Cambridge Pre-U, IB, and OIB examination scores. Course credit is normally granted for each Cambridge Pre-U Principal Subject examination passed with a score of M3 or higher, each IB Higher Level examination area passed with a score of 5, 6 or 7, and OIB examination area passed with a score of 13 or higher. An IB score of 4 may qualify a student for advanced course work, subject to review by the appropriate academic department. A maximum combined total of thirty-two (32) credits may be earned through Advanced Placement, Cambridge Pre-U, International Baccalaureate, and Option International Baccalaureate examinations.

A student, who has successfully completed advanced secondary school education, including the British Advanced Level Examinations, the French Baccalaureate, the German Abitur, or the equivalent, may receive some advanced standing or transfer credit at Rhodes for that work. Such credit is not granted, however, until the student has been admitted and has enrolled at Rhodes, at which time his or her credentials will be reviewed by the Registrar and the academic departments in which the credit(s) will be applied.

Enrollment Deposit

In order to reserve a place in the class, all accepted students must submit a non-refundable $400.00 enrollment deposit to the College. Mailed deposits must be postmarked no later than our deadline of May 1 (December 15 for Early Decision I; February 15 for Early Decision II; June 15 for transfer students). The deposit is not an extra charge but is credited to the student’s account and deducted from other expenses. The balance of the first tuition, fees, room and board payment is due in early August. The College cannot guarantee that a residence hall room will be available unless this balance is paid at that time.

Orientation and Registration

All new students are expected to attend the Open Rhodes Orientation program during the summer prior to enrollment and to be present for Welcome Week, which immediately precedes the opening of the College. Orientation is designed to acquaint new students with the traditions, ideals, academic expectations and regulations of Rhodes and to give them an opportunity to plan their courses of study in consultation with members of the faculty. During orientation and Welcome Week, the new students will also meet with the representatives of various student organizations, take placement tests, receive instruction in the use of the library, participate in social events and attend discussions with administrative officers of the College. Additional information about the Open Rhodes summer orientation program is available online at rhodes.edu/parents/24518.asp.

A complete medical examination and record of immunization are required of all full-time new students. This medical examination should take place prior to enrollment. The results of the examination along with immunization records, recorded on a form provided by the College, must be on file in the College Student Health Center before registration. Failure to provide the form may result in not being permitted to register and not being provided medical services until the form has been received. In the case of insufficient or missing medical data, the student may be granted provisional registration. Proof of health insurance is required of all students. A copy of your insurance card will be requested with the completed Health Form. Failure to provide proof of insurance may result in not being permitted to register and will result in not being provided medical services.

Additional Information

Office of Admission business hours are 8:30 a.m. to 5:00 p.m., Monday through Friday (Central Time). Additional information is available upon request. Contact:

Office of Admission
Rhodes College
2000 North Parkway
Memphis, Tennessee 38112-1690
Telephone: 901-843-3700 or toll-free 1-800-844-5969
Fax: 901-843-3631
E-mail: adminfo@rhodes.edu
Online: rhodes.edu/admission

Expenses

The cost of an education at Rhodes is of concern to students, their families, and to the College. Rhodes has been able to hold charges for tuition, room, and board to about 75% of the total cost of a student’s education. The College’s success in annual fundraising and the substantial income derived from the endowment have enabled Rhodes to hold costs below those at many comparable colleges. The tuition charge includes some services in the College Health Services Center, admission to athletic events, and a wide range of activities sponsored by academic departments or the College at large. The student activity fee supports student publications and student organizations, as well as many College-sponsored social activities which are held throughout the year. A summary of costs for the 2017-2018 academic year is listed below; students should bear in mind that charges for textbooks and supplies are not included.

 

Semester

Year

Tuition

$23,097.00

$46,194.00

Activity Fee

155.00

310.00

 

Room Type

Meals Per Week

Semester

Year

Standard Multiple

15

5,438.00

10,876.00

Single Standard

15

5,989.00

11,978.00

Standard Multiple

21

5,645.00

11,290.00

Standard Single

21

6,196.00

12,392.00

East Village Multiple

7

5,075.00

10,150.00

East Village Single

7

5,338.00

10,676.00

East Village Multiple

15

6,158.00

12,316.00

East Village Single

15

6,421.00

12,842.00

East Village Multiple

21

6,365.00

12,730.00

East Village Single

21

6,628.00

13,256.00

West Village Multiple

15

5,884.00

11,768.00

West Village Single

15

6,193.00

12,386.00

West Village Multiple

21

6,091.00

12,182.00

West Village Single

21

6,400.00

12,800.00

Parkway Hall Multiple

7

5,075.00

10,150.00

Parkway Hall Single

7

5,338.00

10,676.00

Parkway Hall Multiple

15

6,158.00

12,316.00

Parkway Hall Single

15

6,421.00

12,842.00

Parkway Hall Multiple

21

6,365.00

12,730.00

Parkway Hall Single

21

6,628.00

13,256.00

 

 

The regular college plan provides for payment of tuition, room and board in two installments. The payment for the Fall Semester is due August 9th, and the payment for the Spring Semester is due November 22nd. Students are billed less deposits already made.

If monthly payments are preferred by parents and/or guardians, Rhodes allows such payments through one agency: Tuition Management Systems (1-800-356-8329, www.afford.com/rhodes). Information on the various plans offered by TMS will be mailed to all parents well before the first payment is due. If a monthly plan is chosen, arrangements should be made prior to the date the first payment is due. The College has also made arrangements with A.W.G. Dewar, Inc. to offer a tuition refund plan to Rhodes parents that will provide a refund in case of illness or accident causing the student to withdraw before the semester is completed. Information concerning the tuition refund plan that details the protection provided and cost of the coverage will be provided to parents before the first payment is due.

Regulations Regarding Billing and Payment

A bill for the tuition charge along with applicable room and board and other charges will be sent electronically before each due date to the student and those whom the student has set up as authorized payers in the QuikPay billing and payment system. Unless prior arrangements acceptable to the Bursar of the College are made, a student’s account not paid in full at the due date will be regarded as delinquent. A student whose account is delinquent will be denied the privileges of registration, attending classes, obtaining academic transcripts, using College facilities, or being admitted to graduation.

Students may enroll in courses totaling nineteen credits in each semester. The student desiring to take more than a normal academic load during a semester should consult the section of the catalogue on “Registration” appearing under “Academic Regulations.” A student who enrolls in more than nineteen credits in a semester must pay the extra credit fee even if the student eventually withdraws from the overload credit.

First-year students and sophomores are required to live on campus the full academic year.

Once a student moves into a residence hall room, room and board charges for the full semester are due and payable on the student’s account. Even if the student moves out of the room during the semester, the full room and board charges for that semester remain due on the student’s account. Because of the high demand for College housing, the student who is not withdrawing from Rhodes and is a resident only in the Fall Semester will be fined $500 if he/she is not moved out of the room by the day after the last final examination of the Fall Semester.

Students living in the residence halls are required to choose either the 15 meals per week dining plan or the 21 meals per week dining plan. Students living in the East Village resident hall or Parkway Hall also have the option of choosing the 7 meals per week dining plan. There are no exceptions to this policy. Meals may be taken in either the Burrow Refectory or with a cash equivalency in the Lynx Lair. Students will be given the opportunity to choose the board plan they prefer prior to the start of the school year. Students may change their board option by contacting Rhodes Express prior to the beginning of the next semester. Once the board plan has begun for a semester, no further changes may be made. Non-resident students may also purchase one of the meal plan options by contacting Rhodes Express prior to the beginning of the semester.

All students living in the residence hall must pay the full comprehensive tuition, regardless of the number of credit hours taken in the semester.

If at some point it becomes necessary to turn the student account over for collection, the student will be required to reimburse the College the fees of any collection agency, which may be based on a percentage of the debt, and all costs and expenses, including reasonable attorney’s fees, incurred by the College in such collection efforts.

Withdrawal Policy

All requests for withdrawal must be initiated by the student through the Office of Student Development and Academic Services. The official date of withdrawal will be the last day that the student attended class. Once the Bursar has received all the necessary information concerning the withdrawal, the financial accounts of the student will be settled based upon the policies below. Involuntary withdrawals (i.e. suspensions or expulsions) are handled the same as voluntary withdrawals in that tuition and other fees remain due for the semester in which the suspension or expulsion occurs.

TUITION: If a student has attended classes, the full semester’s tuition is due and payable to the College regardless of the date of withdrawal, unless the student withdraws due to protracted illness or injury. Should this illness be certified by a physician, psychologist, or other qualified professional that it prevents the completion of the semester’s academic work, a pro-rata charge for tuition will be made on the following basis (“days” is defined as days when classes are scheduled, i.e. five days per week).

Withdrawal Date

Pro-rata Semester Tuition Due
(for medical reasons only)

First 10 days of semester

25%

11th through 25th day

50%

26th through 35th day

75%

After 35th day of semester

100%

FINANCIAL AID: Rhodes financial aid remains credited to the account on the same basis as the charge for tuition above. When a student leaves the college, however, federal, state, and/or institutional financial aid funds may need to be returned to the entity providing the funding. The Bursar will determine the amount of unearned financial aid received by the student. The return of those funds may create a balance due to the college, and it is the student’s responsibility to pay that balance.

ROOM AND BOARD: The full room and board charges for the semester remain due and payable for any semester the student occupies a residence hall room. The charges remain due regardless of the date or reason for withdrawal. There are no pro-rata refunds of room and board charges.

ACTIVITY FEE: The full activity fee charge for the semester remains due and payable for any semester the student attends classes, regardless of the date or reason for withdrawal.

Special Fees and Deposits

Application Fee. $45.00

Enrollment Deposit. $400.00. Applies to incoming students only. The deposit, due by May 1, is non-refundable.

Open Rhodes (orientation) Fee. $200.00

Part-time Tuition (Non-resident degree candidates taking 11 credit hours or less). $1,930.00 per credit hour.

Special Student Tuition (Students not seeking a degree at Rhodes). $1,020.00 per credit hour plus $45.00 application fee.

Special Student Tuition, Audit Rate. $510.00 per credit plus $45.00 application fee.

Summer Course Tuition, 2017. $900.00 per credit hour.

Summer Directed Inquiry and Internship Tuition, 2017. $510.00 per credit hour. All students earning Rhodes credit for directed inquiries and internships during the summer must be charged this rate in order to receive the credit.

Extra Credit Hour Fee. $715.00 per credit hour. This fee is charged of degree-seeking students enrolling in more than nineteen (19) credits in a semester.

Applied Music Fee. Students enrolled in applied music will be charged an additional fee of $490.00 per credit for private lessons. After the first applied music lesson, this applied lesson fee is nonrefundable.

Once declared, Music majors will have the Applied Music fees waived for up to eight (8) credits of their principal applied instrument. Music majors taking more than eight (8) credits of Applied Music and lessons taken prior to declaration of the major will be charged the applied fee for those credits.

Once declared, Music minors will have the Applied Music fees waived for up to four (4) credits of Applied Music and lessons taken prior to declaration of the minor will be charged the applied fee for those credits.

If a student fails to graduate as a music major or minor, the applied lesson fees that would have otherwise been assessed will be retroactively added to the student’s account.

NOTE: Music Talent Award and Fine Arts Award recipients' conditions for waivers of Applied Music fees are outlined in their award letters, which supersedes music major and minor fee waivers as contained here.

Late Enrollment Clearance Fee. $50.00

Late Payment Fee. $25.00

Key Fob Replacement Fee. $25.00

Student ID Card Replacement Fee. $10.00

 

Financial Aid

Rhodes invests substantial funds in institutional financial assistance to help make it possible for students who are admitted to the College to attend. Currently, approximately 90% of Rhodes students receive some form of federal, state, institutional, or outside financial assistance, with total assistance amounting to over $100 million.

Most aid awarded by the College is offered as a combination of grant, loan and student employment. Rhodes takes full advantage of the available federal and state financial assistance programs when awarding financial aid to students. Additionally, through the generosity of loyal alumni and other friends of the College, Rhodes students benefit from a generous competitive fellowship and scholarship program.

Definitions

COA: Cost of Attendance (tuition, fees, room, and board, estimated cost of books, estimated personal/living costs and estimated transportation costs). The term “Direct COA” only includes tuition and fees. Room and board are included as "Direct COA" only for students who reside at or have purchased a meal plan through Rhodes College.

EFC: Expected Family Contribution; the minimum amount a family is expected to contribute for the student’s education for a given academic year. The EFC is calculated by the FAFSA and the CSS PROFILE and assumes families will finance education utilizing current income, past savings, and student and/or parental borrowing.

Demonstrated Need: The difference between the COA and the EFC.

FAFSA: Free Application for Federal Student Aid; used in awarding federal and state grants and scholarships as well as loans and student employment.

CSS PROFILE: A financial aid application that Rhodes uses to award Rhodes Grant funding. The CSS PROFILE is a product of The College Board.

SAP: Satisfactory Academic Progress: federal and institutional requirement that students must consistently progress toward completion of degree requirements; includes GPA and earned hours measured at the end of each academic year.

Financial aid APPLICATION PROCEDURES for prospective students

• Submit the CSS PROFILE and FAFSA (https://profileonline.collegeboard.com/): Early Decision applicants should complete the CSS PROFILE by November 1; Early Action by November 15; Early Decision II by January 15; and Regular Decision by January 15. The code for Rhodes to receive the CSS PROFILE results is 1730.

• Submit the FAFSA (www.fafsa.ed.gov) between October 1 and January 1. The Title IV Code for Rhodes to receive the FAFSA results is 003519. All prospective students who want consideration for federal and state financial assistance, including Early Decision applicants, must complete the FAFSA.  Prospective students seeking institutional grants must also complete the CSS PROFILE by the deadlines indicated above. Early applicants who received a financial aid award package based on the CSS PROFILE must complete the FAFSA in February to confirm the package.  Failure to complete the FAFSA may result in the reduction or elimination of awarded federal aid.

• Notification of financial aid awards for admitted Early Decision applicants will begin November 15, with admitted Early Action applicants receiving financial aid awards by February 1 and admitted Regular Decision applicants on a rolling basis.

• Students accept or decline financial aid awards online at https://banweb.rhodes.edu.

Financial aid APPLICATION PROCEDURES for currently enrolled/returning students

Currently enrolled/returning students who wish to continue eligibility for need-based financial aid (and for the Tennessee Education Lottery Scholarships for Tennessee residents) must complete the FAFSA each year. Rhodes encourages students to complete the Renewal FAFSA as soon as possible between October 1 and March 1. Returning Tennessee students who qualified for the State grant (TSAA) in previous years must complete the FAFSA by December 15 to be considered for renewal.

The Department of Education will send renewal notices to students in October of each year via email. Returning students who are reapplying for financial aid do not need to complete the CSS PROFILE. The CSS PROFILE is required of first-time financial aid applicants only.

Financial Aid Awards

If the results of the FAFSA reveal that a student has a financial need, Rhodes will normally offer the student a financial aid award that consists of gift aid (federal and state grants) and self-help (loans and student employment). Rhodes funds, federal funds, state funds and funds provided to the student through outside organizations are all considered a part of the need-based financial aid package and are applied to need first, per federal regulations. The need-based programs commonly available at Rhodes are described on the following pages.

Grants

Rhodes Grant: Students may receive a Rhodes Grant along with other forms of assistance such as competitive scholarships/fellowships, student loans, and student employment. Rhodes Grants are not always need-based. Rhodes uses this funding to meet need and/or to offer assistance based on the overall characteristics of students who show promise of success at Rhodes and the ability and desire to take full advantage of all Rhodes has to offer. The annual value of a student’s Rhodes Grant remains constant throughout the student’s tenure at Rhodes. Exceptions to this are within the purview of the Financial Aid Office in response to extreme increases in demonstrated financial need (per the FAFSA, CSS PROFILE or other supporting financial documents) from one year to the next.

Federal Pell Grant: The federal government provides direct assistance to eligible students through the Federal Pell Grant Program. Eligibility for the Federal Pell Grant is determined by the results of the FAFSA.

Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG): Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants are awarded by Rhodes to students with exceptional financial need, defined as those students who are eligible for Pell Grant. SEOG funds are limited and are awarded until funds are exhausted.

Tennessee Student Assistance Award (TSAA): Students who are residents of Tennessee apply for the TSAA via the FAFSA. To be eligible, a student must have graduated from a Tennessee high school, have been a continuous resident of Tennessee for the twelve-month period preceding the start of the academic year for which the grant is made, and have an EFC of or below $2100 (subject to change per state funding). Returning students wishing to renew the award must complete the FAFSA before January 7th to remain eligible.  Further information may be obtained from the Tennessee Student Assistance Corporation, Suite 1950, Parkway Towers, 404 James Robertson Parkway, Nashville, TN 37243-0820. The phone number is (800) 342-1663 or (615) 741-1346. The website is www.TN.gov/collegepays. The State of Tennessee is the final authority on eligibility for the program. Rhodes is not responsible for replacing lost state grant funding.

Ministerial Grant: As a church-related college, Rhodes will assist children of Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.) ministers with a $1,000 ministerial grant above any Rhodes grant or scholarship previously awarded. Dependents of PCUSA ministers should indicate their interest in the Ministerial Grant on the Rhodes Part I Application for Admission/Common Application Supplement.

Tennessee Education Lottery Scholarship Program (TELS): The State of Tennessee offers scholarships of up to $5,500 for Tennessee residents who attend an approved college or university in Tennessee. The FAFSA is the application for the TELS funding and must be completed by state-established deadlines, as indicated on FAFSA on the Web at www.fafsa.gov. Information on all requirements for the TELS may be found at www.TN.gov/collegepaystn.com. The State of Tennessee is the final authority on eligibility for the program. Rhodes is not responsible for replacing lost state grant funding.

Loans

Federal Perkins Loan: Rhodes awards Federal Perkins Loans to students who demonstrate exceptional financial need. The Perkins Loan is a 5% interest loan on which no interest is charged and no payments are made as long as the student is enrolled at Rhodes for at least 6 credits. Repayment begins nine months after the student ceases being at least a half-time student. Repayment of the Perkins Loan may extend over a 10-year period. Rhodes will not award any new Perkins Loan recipients.

Federal Direct Student Loan Program: These federal loans up to $5,500 are available to first-year undergraduate students. Upon earning 30 credits, students may obtain loans up to $6,500 for the sophomore year, and, upon earning 63 credits, students may obtain loans of up to $7,500 per year for the remaining years of undergraduate study.

Federal Direct Loans are either subsidized or unsubsidized. In the case of a subsidized loan, the federal government pays the interest while the student is enrolled in an eligible institution on at least a half-time basis. In the case of an unsubsidized loan, the student is responsible for interest payment while enrolled at least half-time. Repayment begins six months after the student graduates or ceases to be enrolled at least half-time. The standard repayment period is ten years, and the current year's interest rate is fixed at 3.76% for both subsidized Federal Direct Loans and unsubsidized Federal Direct Loans. This rate may change on July 1st each year as determined by federal allocation.

Student Loan of the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.): Up to $1,000 annually may be borrowed from the Student Loan Fund administered by the General Mission Board on behalf of the Presbyterian Church. The student must have been a member of the denomination continuously for at least one year immediately preceding the date of application. Evidence of financial need is required. Students interested in this loan should address all communications to:

Presbyterian Church (U. S. A.)
Office of Financial Aid for Studies
100 Witherspoon Street
Louisville, KY 40202-1396
Telephone: (888) 728-7228
http://www.pcusa.org/financialaid

Student Employment

Student employment programs at Rhodes include the Federal Student Employment Program and the Rhodes Student Employment Program. When an offer of student employment of any type is extended by the College and accepted by the student, this offer does not guarantee that the student will earn the full amount of the award. The student will be paid only for the hours worked, and the award amount represents maximum gross wages a student may earn. Earnings are paid directly to the student; they are not credited to the student’s account in the Bursar’s Office. To begin work, a student employee must have an I-9 form on file in the Financial Aid Office and a current W-4 form on file in the Accounting Office.

Federal Student Employment Program (FWS): Through the Federal Student Employment Program, part-time employment is offered to students to help them meet their financial need. A student may work for no less than the prevailing minimum wage rate for as many as thirty-five (35) hours per week during the summer and for an average of ten (10) hours per week while enrolled as a regular student during the academic year.

Rhodes Student Employment Program (CCE): Employment on the campus may be offered through the Rhodes Student Employment Program to students who do not demonstrate financial need. In these cases, employment will be offered only after those commitments made to students eligible for the FWS Program (described above) are honored. Students in this category (no demonstrated need) who desire employment on campus should contact the financial aid office. A student may work for no less than the prevailing minimum wage rate for as many as thirty-five (35) hours per week during the summer and for an average of ten (10) hours per week while enrolled as a regular student during the academic year.

Rhodes Student Associate Program (RSAP): Through the RSA Program employment may be offered on a part-time basis regardless of financial need. A student may apply for RSAP beginning in the fall of their freshman year as applications become available. A student may work up to fifteen (15) hours per week during the academic year only. Summer employment is not available in this program. A student may not hold another job on campus in conjunction with their RSA position including the Bonner and CODA fellowships.

Withdrawal From Rhodes and Return of Funds

Return of Federal Title IV Student Aid: When a student who has Federal Title IV student aid withdraws from the College or does not return from an approved leave of absence, within the same academic term, the unearned portion of those funds must be returned to the federal student aid programs. Federal Title IV funds that may have to be returned include the Federal Pell Grant, the Federal Direct Loan, the Federal Direct Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS), the Federal Perkins Loan and the Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grant (SEOG). The unearned portion of Federal Title IV funds is determined by dividing the number of days in the term that have passed as of the date of withdrawal (last date of class attendance) by the total number of days in the term. If the withdrawal occurs after 60% of the term has elapsed, no return of Title IV funds is required. The Bursar’s Office calculates the Return of Title IV funds amount and informs the Financial Aid Office and the student of the results of the calculation.

Federal regulations require funds be returned to federal programs in the following order: Unsubsidized Federal Direct Loans, Subsidized Federal Direct Loans, Federal Perkins Loans. If funds remain after repaying all loan amounts, the remaining funds are repaid to Federal Pell Grants and Federal Supplemental Educational Opportunity Grants (SEOG).

Return of State and Institutional Student Aid: When a student who has state and/or institutional student aid withdraws from the College or does not return from an approved leave of absence, the College returns the unearned portion of those funds to the state and/or the College.

Student Financial Responsibility: Students and parents should be aware that the requirement to return Federal Title IV assistance and the policy to return state and institutional aid might result in a balance due to Rhodes College; the student and/or student’s family is responsible for paying any balance resulting from the return of Title IV aid and state and institutional funds.

Scholarships and Fellowships

Financial need is not a consideration in awarding scholarships and fellowships at Rhodes, with the exception of the Bonner Scholarship. Federal regulations, however, do require that any assistance, including competitive scholarships and fellowships, first apply towards the demonstrated need when awarding need-based aid.

Rhodes’ competitive scholarships and fellowships are awarded only to entering students. Returning students not initially offered a competitive scholarship or fellowship will not be considered for a competitive scholarships or fellowship at a later time. Returning students who have been awarded a competitive scholarship or fellowship will not be considered for scholarships or fellowships of greater value as they progress through Rhodes.

All qualified applicants are automatically considered for Rhodes’ competitive scholarships and fellowships, unless a separate application is required and specified.

Please note: A description of our broader FELLOWSHIPS PROGRAM, which provides opportunities for research, service, creative activities, internships and study abroad during the academic year and over the summer, can be found in the OPPORTUNITIES FOR INDIVIDUALIZED STUDY section of this catalogue. Many of these opportunities include stipends.

Competitive Scholarships

Competitive scholarships are awarded on the basis of a candidate’s academic record, leadership, character, and personal achievements. Competitive scholarships may be renewed for a maximum of three renewals provided the student meets the financial aid satisfactory academic progress standards, enrolled in undergraduate program and maintains the GPA requirements of the scholarship; however, the student must maintain full-time student status (at least 12 credits) through the extended drop period of each semester. The total amount of Rhodes-funded scholarships, fellowships and grants may not exceed direct charges of tuition, fees, room, and board. Students who move off campus would be subject to a reduction of institutional aid.

The Morse, Cambridge, Ralph C. Hon, Diehl, Dean's and Presidential Scholarships and Rhodes Awards are awarded to entering students based on the candidate’s academic record, leadership, character, and personal achievements.

Bellingrath, Morse and Cambridge scholarships include an oppportunity for a one-time fellowship worth up to the equivalent of $5,000 for a summer's worth of study in an approved area of the student's choosing through the fellowship program.   A description of our broader FEWLLOWSHIPS PROGRAM can be found in the OPPORTUNITIES FOR INDIFIDUALIZED Study section of the catalogue.

Dean’s Scholarships are awarded to outstanding entering students who diversify the cultural demography of the college.

Competitive Fellowships

At Rhodes, we have taken traditional scholarships a step further by allowing students to invest in themselves through professional internships, community service, research or other requirements in exchange for financial assistance. In addition to funding, recipients of fellowships receive real-world experience that puts their education into action. Competitive fellowships for incoming students are awarded to students based on academic ability, leadership, character, personal achievement, or special talents and provide service, research, or internship opportunities to recipients. Most fellowships require the submission of a separate application.

Fellowships may be renewed for a maximum of three renewals provided the student meets the financial aid satisfactory academic progress standards, the GPA requirements of the fellowship, and the service, internship, research, or other requirements of the fellowship. In addition, the student must maintain full-time student status (at least 12 credits) through the extended drop period of each semester to continue to receive the fellowship. The total amount of Rhodes-funded scholarships, fellowships and grants may not exceed tuition, fees, room, and board.

Walter D. Bellingrath Fellowships. Bellingrath Fellowships receive a stipend equal to the full cost of tuition at Rhodes, are awarded to the College’s most outstanding first-year students.

Fine Arts Fellowships. Fine Arts Fellowships are made each year to entering students who have demonstrated outstanding achievement in the areas of art, music and theater. Auditions are required in music and theatre, and art requires the submission of slides. The Fine Arts Fellowships are valued up to $12,500 per year. If a student qualifies for a Fine Arts Fellowship and another competitive scholarship or fellowship, only one scholarship or fellowship (whichever is greater) will be awarded. Winners of these fellowships are required to major or minor in a Fine Arts discipline while at Rhodes.

Spencer Fellowships in Greek and Roman Studies. Spencer Fellowships are awarded to first-year students who have distinguished themselves in the study of Latin, ancient Greek or the civilizations of ancient Greece and Rome. Each year, up to three Spencer Fellowships are awarded in the amount of $2,000 to $3,000 in addition to any other Rhodes grant or fellowship received. The fellowships are renewable for three years provided the student meets the financial aid satisfactory academic progress standards, maintains a 2.75 cumulative GPA, and participates in the Greek and Roman Studies program.

Jack H. Taylor Fellowship in Physics. The Taylor Fellowship in Physics recognizes talented high school physics students and encourages their continued college development in physics. The Fellowship is valued up to $15,000 per year based on the qualifications of the recipient and is in addition to any other Rhodes grant or fellowship the student may receive. At least one fellowship will be awarded to a first-year student each year.

Bonner Scholarships. The Bonner Scholarships are for students who have demonstrated an exceptional record of leadership and service participation in their communities and who wish to become effective leaders who promote positive change in the world. The Bonner Scholarships are awarded on a competitive basis and support fifteen first-year students who have competitive SAT or ACT scores, a strong high school record, and demonstrate an outstanding record of leadership, community service and/or social justice work.

To be eligible, the student’s family must have a federal Expected Family Contribution (EFC) below $10,500 (with a few exceptions made for outstanding candidates). Scholarships plus stipend are valued at $12,500 and are in addition to any Rhodes grant or scholarship the student may receive during the standard academic year. Bonner Scholars are also awarded funding for two summer service projects, access to a community fund to support service projects, and up to $2,000 for the purpose of reducing total educational loan indebtedness upon graduation from Rhodes.

Clarence Day Scholarship. Day Scholarships are made each year to entering students who are from Shelby County and who have demonstrated a strong interest in the Memphis community. Students must have a strong academic record and have intentions of staying in Memphis after graduation. The scholarship is renewable for three years provided the student meets the renewal criteria. The scholarship is valued at $35,000 per year and an opportunity for a one-time fellowship experience with a stipend of $5,000. Applicants must apply and meet all deadlines to be considered for this scholarship. In addition to the award amount, a student’s financial need to cover direct costs is met with scholarship, grant, and work. Loans may be offered to assist with indirect costs or offset calculated family contribution.

Other Scholarships and Awards

Rhodes College-Sponsored National Merit Scholarships. Awards sponsored by Rhodes may be offered to first-year students who are designated as finalists in the National Merit Scholarship competition and who have designated Rhodes as their first choice. Recipients may not receive other National Merit Scholarships. The minimum value of the scholarship is $500. However, if the candidate has financial need, as demonstrated on the FAFSA, the value of the award can be up to a maximum of $2,000. The awards are renewable for three years provided the student meets the financial aid satisfactory academic progress standards.

The Presbyterian Partnership. Because Rhodes shares an important relationship with the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.), a special scholarship program, called the Presbyterian Partnership, has been established. Through this program Rhodes seeks to strengthen its ties with the Church and to help students obtain the distinctive and high quality education available at Rhodes. In the program, the Session of a Presbyterian church may nominate a student to receive a Partnership grant of $1,000, $2,000 or $4,000. The church contributes one-half of the Partnership grant to Rhodes, and the College supplies the other half and applies the total to the student’s account. Any institutional grant or scholarship previously awarded the recipient by Rhodes will be used to match the Church’s portion of the scholarship (i.e. no additional grant or scholarship aid will be awarded). Eligibility requirements for a Partnership Scholarship are:

  • The student must be nominated by the Session of a local Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.).
  • Only first-year students and transfer students are eligible for an initial Partnership Scholarship.
  • The recipient must meet all requirements for admission to Rhodes as a full-time student and maintain satisfactory academic progress at all times.

Interested students should contact their pastor or Clerk of Session to see if their church is willing to enter into a Partnership agreement with Rhodes. If the church wishes to participate, the church should write a letter to the Rhodes College Financial Aid Office specifying the annual amount of the Presbyterian Partnership it wishes to partner with Rhodes. As mentioned above, one-half of that annual amount will be furnished by the church and the other half will be furnished by Rhodes, provided no other Rhodes scholarship/fellowship/grant has been awarded. For further information about the Presbyterian Partnership Program, contact the Financial Aid Office..

National Presbyterian College Scholarships. Rhodes participates in the National Presbyterian College Scholarship Program. Rhodes may co-sponsor one award each year to an entering first-year student. This award, based on financial need and ranging in value from $700 to $1,400, is renewable for up to three additional years provided the student meets the financial aid satisfactory academic progress standards.

The National Presbyterian College Scholarship Selection Committee will determine the winner from those applicants who indicate on the application that Rhodes is their first choice among the participating Presbyterian Colleges. Application forms may be obtained from and must be returned by January 31 to:

National Presbyterian College Scholarships

Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.)
Financial Aid for Studies
100 Witherspoon Street Mezzanine
Louisville, KY 40202-1396
http://www.pcusa.org/financialaid/

American Field Service Returnee Scholarships. Rhodes will provide up to five (5) AFS Returnee Scholarships valued at $500 per year and renewable for up to three additional years provided the student meets the financial aid satisfactory academic progress standards. The scholarships are available on a competitive basis to any AFS returnee who is offered admission to the College.

HOBY Scholarships. These scholarships are available on a competitive basis to any participant in a HOBY seminar who is offered admission to the College. The scholarship is valued at $500 per year and is renewable for three years provided the student meets the financial aid satisfactory academic progress standards. A maximum of five (5) HOBY Scholarships will be awarded each year.

Youth for Understanding Scholarships. Rhodes will provide up to five (5) YFU Scholarships per year valued at $500 and renewable for three additional years provided the student meets the financial aid satisfactory academic progress standards. The scholarships are available on a competitive basis to any YFU participant who is offered admission to the College.

Army ROTC Scholarships. Rhodes students may compete for Army ROTC scholarships providing college tuition and educational fees. Awardees also receive a book allowance of $600 per semester and a stipend varying from $350 - $500 per month from the Army (estimated).

Students awarded an Army ROTC scholarship may receive a Rhodes Grant equivalent to the cost of on-campus room and board based upon the 21 meal, standard multiple occupancy room rate. The Rhodes Grant will be awarded unless the student has already received a Rhodes College scholarship, fellowship or grant equal to or greater than the indicated grant amount. Rhodes Grants are renewable for three years as long as the student retains his/her ROTC Scholarship and meets the satisfactory academic progress standards for financial aid. Information about Army ROTC Scholarships may be obtained by writing to Army ROTC, The University of Memphis, Memphis, TN 38152, or by calling Army ROTC at (901) 678-2933.

Air Force ROTC Scholarships. Through an agreement between Rhodes and the United States Air Force, Rhodes students may participate fully in the AFROTC program based at the University of Memphis and can compete for AFROTC scholarships. Incoming freshman can compete for four, and in certain cases, five year scholarships by applying for an AFROTC College Scholarship (CSP) online at www.afrotc.com. Applicants must apply no later than December 1 of the year prior to entering college as a first-year student. Scholarships awarded through the CSP program include: (1) full-tuition and fees (Type 1); (2) up to $15,000 per year towards tuition and fees (Type 2); and (3) up to $9,000 per year towards tuition and fees (Type 7). Students not selected for a CSP scholarship, if eligible, can compete for a scholarship through the In College Scholarship Program (ICSP) once they are enrolled at Rhodes and in AFROTC. These scholarships include: (1) up to $15,000 per year towards tuition and fees (Type 2); (2) up to $9,000 towards tuition and fees (Type 3); and up to $3,000 towards tuition and fees (Type 6). Students who receive the Type 2 scholarships through CSP or ISCP are eligible to compete for an upgrade to 80 percent of tuition and fees. All AFROTC scholarship programs include a $900 per year book allowance.

Scholarship awardees who receive the Type 1 scholarship are also eligible to receive a Rhodes grant equivalent to the cost of on-campus room and board based upon the 21-meal, standard multiple-occupancy rate. Those students who are awarded the Type 2 scholarship may receive a Rhodes grant equivalent to fifty percent (50%) of the on-campus cost of room and board based upon the 21 meal, standard multiple occupancy rate. The Rhodes grant will be awarded unless the student has already received a Rhodes College scholarship, fellowship or grant equal to or greater than the indicated grant amount. Rhodes grants are renewable for up to three years as long as the student retains his/her ROTC Scholarship and meets the satisfactory academic progress standards for financial aid. Please note that if a Type I recipient chooses to live at home or with relatives, the amount of the Rhodes grant plus the Air Force Type I scholarship cannot be more than Rhodes’ cost of attendance for a commuter student living with relatives.

For details regarding the AFROTC program or scholarships contact the Unit Admissions Officer, Air Force ROTC Detachment at (901) 678-2681 or visit the AFROTC Detachment 785 website at www.afrotc.memphis.edu.

Edscholar Scholarships. Normally one volunteer state student assistance program (VSSAP) Scholarship is awarded biannually to first-year students who are Tennessee residents. Selection of scholarship recipients is based on the student’s community service/leadership record, academic achievements and financial need. The Edscholar Scholarship has a stipend of $7,000 per year for four years and will be renewed yearly as long as the recipient remains a full-time student at Rhodes and maintains a 2.50 grade point average. The scholarship is funded by Edfinancial located in Knoxville, TN.

Outside Scholarships. Scholarships from other organizations may also be available to students who attend Rhodes. Some of these awards are administered through high schools. However, in most cases, the student applies directly to a club or association. Interested students should work with their high school counselors to learn of those scholarships available in their area. Please note that outside scholarships, like the above aid, become part of the financial aid package and assist in meeting demonstrated financial need. Students must notify the Rhodes Financial Aid Office of any outside funding he or she receives. A student may not receive more aid than the published cost of attendance at Rhodes. Federal and/or state aid may need to be reduced in instances when aid from all resources exceeds cost of attendance.

Tuition Exchange Programs

Associated Colleges of the South (ACS). Children of employees of ACS participating institutions are eligible to be considered for the ACS Tuition Exchange.

Rhodes’ agreement with ACS indicates that for any given academic year, ACS “imports” (students attending Rhodes as an ACS Tuition Exchange student) will not exceed “exports” (children of Rhodes employees attending another ACS college under the agreement) by more than three students.

Each ACS Tuition Exchange recipient pays a participation fee of $1,500 per academic year. The ACS Tuition Exchange benefit is equivalent to full tuition at Rhodes and is renewable for three years provided the student meets the financial aid satisfactory academic progress standards and meets the eligibility requirements indicated above. Recipients may be required to live in a residence hall at the College’s discretion. Participants must be full-time degree candidates.

ACS Tuition Exchange benefits may be used for one of the following Rhodes study abroad programs: European Studies or Rhodes Exchange. All other study abroad programs are ineligible programs for ACS Tuition Exchange benefits.

Interested students must specify that admission is being sought under the ACS Tuition Exchange program, apply for all state and/or federal aid for which he or she may be eligible, and have submitted an ACS Tuition Exchange certification form completed by the appropriate official at their home institution certifying their eligibility for the exchange. Eligible students must meet Rhodes’ normal admission requirements.

Association of Presbyterian Colleges and Universities (APCU). Students who are the dependent children and spouses of full-time faculty and staff in APCU colleges which have endorsed the Plan are eligible to be considered. Eligible students must meet Rhodes’ normal admission requirements to be considered.

Rhodes’ agreement with APCU indicates that for any given academic year, APCU “imports” (students attending Rhodes as an APCU Tuition Exchange student) will not exceed “exports” (children of Rhodes employees attending another APCU college under the agreement) by more than one student.

The APCU Tuition Exchange benefit is equivalent to full tuition at Rhodes and is renewable for three years provided the student meets the financial aid satisfactory academic progress standards and meets the eligibility requirements indicated above. Recipients may be required to live in a residence hall at the College’s discretion.

APCU Tuition Exchange benefits may be used for one of the following Rhodes study abroad programs: European Studies or Rhodes Exchange. All other study abroad programs are ineligible programs for APCU Tuition Exchange benefits.

Interested students must specify that admission is being sought under the APCU Tuition Exchange Agreement and have submitted a letter to the Office of Financial Aid from the president of his/her home institution certifying eligibility for the program.

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) for Renewal of rhodes-funded Financial Aid and Competitive Scholarships/Fellowships

Normally, all forms of institutional financial aid offered by Rhodes are awarded for eight (8) semesters as long as the student meets the SAP standards for renewal of financial aid and, for competitive scholarships and fellowships, maintains the required GPA.

Rhodes scholarships, fellowships, and grants may only be used for study at Rhodes or for approved study in the Rhodes European Studies and Exchange programs.

Funds are not available for summer terms or for studies at or through other institutions. Rhodes funds are not available to students enrolled less than full-time (at least 12 credits) unless an exception is formally approved by the Disability Support Committee (see Students with Disabilities).

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP)

Satisfactory Academic Progress (SAP) for Renewal of federal (TITLE IV), state, and institutional aid, including Federal Direct PLUS (Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students).

Per federal guidelines all students must obtain a cummulative 2.0 grade point average by the end of their sophomore year and complete 67% of all classess taken at Rhodes to remain eligible for financial aid.  Any student who has completed less than 67% of their classes and have less than a 1.25 cummulative as a freshman and less than a 2.0 cummulative gpa as a sophomore will not have meet SAP standards and immediately denied aid per this policy.

A student with extenuating circumstances that contributed to not meeting SAP standards may appeal to be considered for reinstatement of aid on a probationary status.

A student who meets the the cumulative standards below will be considered as being on pace for financial aid purposes.  Eight terms is  the maximum allowance to recieve institutional aid.  A student will have financial aid renewed in succeeding years if the student meets the following requirements:

  • attains a total cumulative grade point average of at least 2.00 in all course work at Rhodes; and,
  • has earned at least 28 credits of course work by the beginning of his/her third semester of study at Rhodes;
  • has earned at least 60 credits of course work by the beginning of his/her fifth semester of study at Rhodes;
  • has earned at least 92 credits of course work by the beginning of his/her seventh semester of study at Rhodes.

NOTE: These standards apply to satisfactory academic progress for financial aid only and do not establish class standing. If changes to the policy above occur prior to the next publication of the Catalogue, the online version of the Catalogue will be updated while awaiting the next publication date for the bound Catalogue.

Additional requirements for renewal of federal (Title IV), state, and institutional aid, including Federal PLUS

  • Students must be enrolled at least half-time (6 credits) in order to be eligible for any Title IV (except Pell Grant) or state assistance. Rhodes Grants requires full-time enrollment (at least 12 credits).
  • For federal and state aid, the maximum time frame in which a student can complete a degree is six (6) years, and the minimum number of credits to be completed at the end of any one of the six years is one sixth of the total number of credits required for a degree (see Graduation Requirements). For any Rhodes-funded aid, the maximum time frame is four (4) years or eight (8) semesters. For the Tennessee Lottery Scholarships, the maximum time frame for receipt of these funds is 136 attempted credits of course work.
  • Grades and cumulative earned credits are reviewed at the end of each academic year for all students, unless stated otherwise by the Director of Financial Aid.
  • All students must obtain a minimum cumulative grade point average at Rhodes of 2.00 by the end of their sophomore year. Should a student’s aid eligibility be revoked due to the student not meeting the above minimum standards, the student may appeal for a variance from the satisfactory academic progress requirements for one term. The appeal should be submitted to the Director of Financial Aid in writing by email or by letter. If the variance request is approved, the student’s aid will be reinstated based on the conditions and length of the approval as stated by the Director of Financial Aid. This decision is communicated via Rhodes email to the student.
  • Enrollment status is based on the recorded enrollment at the end of the “extended drop period” each term.

Definitions and regulations concerning full-time student status, course schedule changes, unauthorized withdrawal from class, and removal of conditional grades are stated in other sections of the College Catalogue.

Students With Disabilities

Students with disabilities who are taking a reduced course load and who have received approval of full-time status will not be denied consideration for Rhodes financial aid. The amount of aid awarded, however, will be reduced to the proportionate amount that corresponds with the student’s course load. For example, a minimum of twelve (12) credits per semester is required to receive Rhodes-funded student aid as a full-time student. If a student has received approval from the Disability Support Committee to be considered a full-time student for a course load of eight (8) credits in a given semester, the Rhodes-funded aid will be reduced to 2/3 of the amount it would have been if the student were taking twelve (12) or more credits. A course load of six (6) credits will always be considered to be half-time. No Rhodes-funded aid will be available to any student who is enrolled less than half-time. Additionally, students with disabilities will be eligible to receive Rhodes-funded aid for a maximum of twelve (12) semesters or 150% of the standard time required for completion of a Bachelor’s degree; the total Rhodes-funded aid will be limited to the amount the student would have received for eight (8) semesters taking standard course loads.

Renewal of Competitive Scholarships

Morse Scholarships may be renewed for three years as long as the student maintains a grade point average of 3.00 or better and meets the minimum satisfactory academic progress standards for renewal of financial aid described previously.

Cambridge Scholarships may be renewed for three years as long as the recipient maintains a grade point average of 2.75 or better and meets the minimum satisfactory academic progress standards for renewal of financial aid described previously.

Dean’s Scholarships, Presidential Scholarships, Hon, Diehl, Day and Memphis Scholars Scholarships may be renewed for three years as long as the recipient maintains a grade point average of 2.50 or better and meets the minimum satisfactory academic progress standards for renewal of financial aid described previously.

Rhodes Awards and Rhodes Grants may be renewed for three years as long as the recipient maintains a grade point average of 2.00 or better and meets the minimum satisfactory academic progress standards for renewal of financial aid described previously.

Renewal of Competitive Fellowships

Bellingrath Fellowships may be renewed for three years as long as the student maintains a grade point average of 3.25 or better, meets the minimum satisfactory academic progress standards for renewal of financial aid described previously, and provides ten hours per week of service to the Admission Office.

Fine Arts Fellowships may be renewed for three years as long as the student has declared, or is making satisfactory progress toward, a major or minor in one of the fine arts. The student must also maintain a grade point average of 2.75 or better and meet the minimum satisfactory academic progress standards for renewal of financial aid previously described.

CODA Fine Arts Fellowships may be renewed for three years as long as the recipient maintains a grade point average of 2.75 or better, meets the minimum satisfactory academic progress standards for renewal of financial aid described previously, and participates in a mentored fine arts research and leadership project that will involve approximately ten hours per week.

Spencer Fellowships in Greek and Roman Studies may be renewed for three years as long as the recipient maintains a grade point average of 2.75 or better, meets the minimum satisfactory academic progress standards for renewal of financial aid described previously, and has declared, or is making satisfactory progress toward, a major or minor in Greek and Roman Studies.

Taylor Fellowships may be renewed for three years as long as the student maintains a grade point average of 3.00 or better, meets the minimum satisfactory academic progress standards for financial aid as described previously, is making satisfactory progress toward a major or minor in physics (as determined by the Physics Department), and provides five hours per week of service to the Physics Department.

Bonner Scholarships may be renewed for three years as long as the recipient meets the minimum satisfactory academic progress standards for renewal of financial aid described previously, maintains a 2.50 grade point average, is involved in community service and leadership programs for an average of ten hours per week, completes two summers of full-time community service for a total of 280 hours over at least a seven-week period, participates in the College’s Leadership Program, and participates in the Bonner Scholars service trip at the end of the student’s first year at Rhodes.

Revision of Financial Aid Awards

Financial aid is dynamic and may change as new information becomes available to the Rhodes Financial Aid Office. Any financial aid package is subject to revision (even during the academic year) for any of the following reasons:

  • In the process of verifying the information the student/parent reported on the need analysis form(s) (FAFSA and/or CSS PROFILE), an error is discovered which, when corrected, changes the student’s eligibility.
  • A change in regulations governing federal or state programs occurs and requires an adjustment to be made.
  • Funding levels in federal or state programs are reduced.
  • The student receives additional financial assistance, including, but not limited to, outside scholarships, from a source not listed on the most recent award notification or on the BannerWeb.
  • The student fails to meet satisfactory academic progress standards for renewal of financial aid.
  • The Financial Aid Office discovers any error, clerical or other, on an award.
  • The student fails to complete required financial aid applications for need-based federal, state and institutional aid, including any documents required for verification of FAFSA information.

Please note that any aid reduced based on the above will not be replaced by Rhodes-funded grant.

Financial Aid for Study Abroad

Rhodes students enrolled in study abroad programs administered (sponsored) by Rhodes (European Studies and Rhodes exchange programs) are eligible for competitive-based and need-based financial aid from Rhodes on the following basis:

  • The total cost of such a program will be defined as tuition, participation fee (if any), an allowance for round trip airfare, a reasonable allowance for ground transportation in the foreign country, an allowance for room and board, books and required supplies and an allowance for incidental personal expenses. The student must report these costs to the Financial Aid Office via a Consortium Agreement.
  • The Expected Family Contribution (EFC) will be calculated using the results of the FAFSA.
  • All forms of financial aid for which the student would normally qualify will be applicable, including Rhodes grants and scholarships, campus-based Title IV and other Title IV funds, as well as any outside loans or scholarships the student might have. However, the sum of Rhodes need-based grant and competitive-based scholarship awarded for the term of the program may not exceed the tuition charge at Rhodes for one semester. Student employment income will be replaced by additional loan, if requested, and need in excess of the cost of attending Rhodes will be met by loan or by the student’s family.
  • In cases where the total cost of the study abroad program is less than the total cost of a semester at Rhodes (as a resident student), the financial aid package will be based on the cost of the study abroad program.
  • Rhodes students receiving financial assistance from the College who choose to participate in one of Rhodes’ exchange programs are considered to be Rhodes students. The financial aid awarded to the student to meet the costs of the exchange program are considered expended for the original length of the program. In other words, a student who elects to participate in a one year exchange program is considered to have been awarded two semesters of aid. If the student decides not to complete the full year of the program, the student should realize that two semesters of aid have been used, even though the entire program was not completed.

For students electing to participate in programs, other than European Studies or Rhodes Exchange, and if Rhodes is to be the degree-granting institution accepting credits from the program, Rhodes will assist the student in obtaining any Title IV funds and state funds for which the student may qualify. However, no Rhodes funds will be available. This policy also applies to off-campus study programs based in the United States (e.g., Washington Semester).

Students will not be eligible for either Rhodes need-based financial aid or for Rhodes competitive scholarship/fellowship aid for more than one study abroad program during their time at Rhodes.

The above policies apply to study abroad programs that occur during the fall and spring semesters of the academic year. Summer study abroad programs are excluded, as no Rhodes need-based aid or competitive scholarships/fellowships are available for summer study abroad.

Students using federal or state aid for study abroad programs must complete a Consortium Agreement as described in the literature from the Study Abroad Office on campus.

Transfer Students

A student transferring to Rhodes who is seeking financial assistance must submit the CSS PROFILE (https://profileonline.collegeboard.com) by March 1 and an accurately completed FAFSA (www.fafsa.gov) by March 1 in order to determine financial need for the upcoming year.

A transfer student shall be eligible for all forms of financial aid (except Bellingrath Fellowships, Bonner Scholarships and Memphis Scholars) provided:

  1. the student’s previous college academic record is commensurate with the requirements for the award (a 3.50 minimum grade point average is required for a Hon Scholarship and a 3.75 minimum grade point average is required for any scholarships or fellowships of greater value) and;
  2. had the student entered Rhodes during the first year in college, such an award would have been awarded.

NOTE: The number of semesters for which a transfer student may receive Rhodes-funded aid is based on the classification of the student upon enrollment. For example, if a transfer student enrolls at Rhodes as a sophomore, that student may receive Rhodes-funded aid for a total of six (6) semesters. A student enrolling as a junior may receive Rhodes-funded aid for a total of four semesters, and so forth.

Alternative Financing

For families who prefer to pay college costs in interest-free monthly installments, Rhodes suggests Tuition Management Systems, 171 Service Avenue, Warick, RI 02886 or by phone at (800)722-4867 or online at www.afford.com/rhodes. Arrangements must be made with this agency prior to the due date of the first tuition payment. The Bursar’s Office is the primary on-campus contact for this program.

Through the Federal Parent Loan for Undergraduate Students (PLUS) program, the parent of an undergraduate student may be eligible to borrow the cost of education at Rhodes less any financial assistance the student receives each year for educational expenses. The current year's interest rate is fixed at 6.84%. The interest rate changes each July 1st as determined by federal appropriations. PLUS applicants are subject to credit approval.

There are a number of alternative (private) loan programs available for interested students and their families. Please refer to the financial aid website at www.rhodes.edu/finaid for more information.

Additional Policies

  • The main method of communication from the Financial Aid Office is to the student, via the student’s Rhodes-assigned email address. Students must communicate with parents concerning financial aid award information, requirements, etc.
  • Most information about the student’s financial aid award(s), requirements for completing the financial aid process, costs of attendance, etc. may be found on the BannerWeb (https://banweb.rhodes.edu), utilizing the student’s Rhodes ID and PIN. The Financial Aid Office does not mail paper award letters or “missing documents” letters home to Rhodes students.
  • The total amount of Rhodes-funded gift aid (scholarships, fellowships and/or grants) a student is eligible to receive may not exceed Rhodes’ direct cost of attendance (tuition, fees, room, and/or board). If the total amount of Rhodes-funded gift aid exceeds the direct cost of attendance, a portion of the Rhodes gift aid will be reduced accordingly.
  • A student may not receive gift aid (scholarships, fellowships and/or grants) from all sources (Rhodes, federal, state, private) in excess of the total cost of attendance at Rhodes (tuition, fees, room, board as well as an estimated allowance for books, transportation, and personal/living expenses). If the total amount of gift aid from all sources exceeds Rhodes’ total cost of attendance, Rhodes gift aid (scholarships, fellowships, and/or grants) will be reduced accordingly.
  • All outside financial assistance or scholarships received by a student attending Rhodes must be reported to the Financial Aid Office, including the annual amount of the award and whether or not the award is renewable past the first year. Rhodes reserves the right to make adjustments in the financial aid package offered to students who receive assistance from other sources.
  • When calculating Rhodes scholarships or grants based on tuition, fees, room and board, the amount used for room is the average amount charged by the College for a student at the multiple occupancy rate for that dorm; the amount used for board is the current on-campus 21-meal plan rate.
  • Rhodes scholarships, fellowships and grants are based on a normal course load (12 - 18 credits under the Foundations Curriculum). Additional costs incurred by a student taking an overload will be incurred at that student’s expense.
  • Rhodes scholarships, fellowships and grants are provided only to students enrolled full-time (at least 12 credits) as of the last day of the extended drop period. Seniors who need less than twelve (12) credits to graduate in their final semester are NOT exempt from this policy.
  • Institutional funds will be awarded for each classification year (i.e. first-year, sophomore, etc.) only once. A maximum of two semesters of assistance will be awarded for any classification. Exceptions to this may be made by formal approval of the Disability Support Committee for students with disabilities (see “Students with Disabilities” section above).
  • Students who graduate early because of overloads, summer course work, etc., forfeit aid for the semester(s) not enrolled. In other words, if a student graduates a semester early, that student cannot have all of the year’s aid in the last semester of enrollment.
  • In most cases, financial aid is not available for summer terms. However, Tennessee Residents eligible for the HOPE Scholarship may be eligible for a prorated HOPE award if enrolled at least half-time. Students that have not exhausted their annual eligibility in loans may request a loan for the summer term if enrolled at least half-time. Students should contact the financial aid office for consideration.
  • Recipients of the Tennessee Education Lottery Scholarship(s) who begin enrollment in any term as a full-time student must maintain full-time status throughout the semester to continue receiving this award. Exceptions to this rule must be approved by the Standards and Standing Committee prior to the student’s dropping below full-time status. Only medical and family emergency issues are considered for exceptions. More information may be found at: www.collegepaystn.com. Recipients of the Tennessee Education Lottery Scholarship(s) must complete the FAFSA every year by the state-established deadline as printed on the FAFSA.
  • Students who accept/decline financial aid awards via BannerWeb are electronically signing their award and agree to the terms of the financial aid package as listed in the Rhodes College Catalogue, in other Rhodes publications, and on the Rhodes website.
  • The following are the definitions for enrollment status for financial aid, including Rhodes scholarships, fellowships and grants:
    • Full Time: 12 credits or greater
    • 3/4 Time: 9 - 11.99 credits
    • 1/2 Time: 6 - 8.99 credits
    • Less than 1/2 time: less than 6 credits
  • The following are earned credit requirements which establish Federal Direct Loan amount eligibility:
    • Less than 30 earned credits: Freshman-level Federal Direct Loan ($5,500)
    • 30 to 62 earned credits: Sophomore-level Federal Direct Loan ($6,500)
    • 63 or more earned credits: Junior and Senior-level Federal Direct Loan ($7,500)

Student Life

Student Government

The main purpose of the Rhodes Student Government is to provide an organization to represent the needs and concerns of the Rhodes student body to the faculty and administration. The Student Government is the primary vehicle for student participation in the governance process of Rhodes. The members of Student Government seek to keep the group effectively involved in many areas of campus life. All meetings are open to the entire campus, and students are strongly encouraged to attend.

The Student Government oversees the allocation of the Student Activity Fund; nominates students for appointment to serve on faculty and administrative committees; directs the Student Government Committees; and generally entertains any matters of student interest or concern at meetings and campus-wide forums. Elections are held in the Spring for all positions except the First-Year Representatives, which are elected in the Fall.

Honor Societies

The Rhodes College Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa, Gamma Chapter of Tennessee, was established at the College in 1949. For over two hundred years, election to Phi Beta Kappa has been a recognition of exceptional academic achievement in the liberal arts and sciences. Rhodes students are elected to Phi Beta Kappa by the members of the chapter chiefly on the basis of outstanding academic achievement in the study of liberal subjects.

Omicron Delta Kappa, Phi Circle, was established at the College in 1927. The purpose of this national organization is to recognize leadership in college activities and to undertake various activities for the good of the College. Student members are chosen from the junior and senior classes, and not more than three per cent of the student body may be elected to membership. Members must have distinguished themselves in such activities as scholarship, athletics, and publications.

Sigma Tau Delta, national English honor society, was established at Rhodes in 1984. The purpose of this society is to promote the study of literature in English and to recognize outstanding achievement in this area.

Mortar Board, a national honor society for seniors, was established at Rhodes April 17, 1964, for the purpose of recognizing excellence in scholarship, leadership, and service.

The Pi Kappa Lambda honorary academic music fraternity was established in the spring of 1949. It recognizes outstanding achievement in music and may elect not over twenty per cent of those members of the senior class majoring in music.

Eta Sigma Phi, honorary society for students of classical language, was established at Rhodes in 1952. The purpose of this society is to promote interest in all aspects of ancient Greek and Roman culture. Those who have at least a B average in advanced courses in either Greek or Latin are eligible for membership.

The Rhodes chapter of Sigma Pi Sigma, the national physics honor society, was established May 27, 1963. The chapter receives into membership physics students and a limited number from closely related fields when such students attain high standards of scholarship, professional merit, and academic distinction.

Omicron Delta Epsilon is one of the worldís largest academic honor societies. The objectives of Omicron Delta Epsilon are recognition of scholastic attainment and the honoring of outstanding achievements in economics; the establishment of closer ties between students and faculty in economics within colleges and universities, and among colleges and universities; the publication of its official journal, The American Economist, and sponsoring of panels at professional meetings as well as the Irving Fisher and Frank W. Taussig competitions. The minimum requirements for admission for undergraduates are completion of 12 semester hours economics courses and attainment of at least a 3.50 in economics courses and an overall 3.50 in all classes. Students do not have to be economics majors, but must have a genuine interest in economics in addition to meeting the above requirements.

Theta Chapter of Sigma Iota Rho, a national honor society in International Studies, is a charter chapter that was founded at Rhodes in 1986. The purpose of Sigma Iota Rho is to recognize academic excellence and to promote information about and study of contemporary international issues. Students are eligible for membership beginning in their junior year, and must have a 3.2 cumulative grade point average and a 3.3 within the major.

Psi Chi, the national honorary society in Psychology, was reactivated at Rhodes in 1987 for the purpose of encouraging, stimulating, and maintaining excellence in scholarship and advancing the science of Psychology as a profession. Membership in this society, which is affiliated with the American Psychological Association and which is a member of the Association of College Honor Societies, is by invitation and limited to Psychology majors.Theta Nu chapter of the National Order of Omega was chartered in the spring of 1987. It serves to recognize outstanding members of the fraternities and sororities on the basis of scholarship and leadership. A grade point average equal to or above the all-Greek average is required for consideration for membership. Applications for members are extended each year to eligible rising juniors and seniors.

Theta Nu chapter of the National Order of Omega was chartered in the spring of 1987. It serves to recognize outstanding members of the fraternities and sororities on the basis of scholarship and leadership. A grade point average equal to or above the all-Greek average is required for consideration for membership. Applications for members are extended each year to eligible rising juniors and seniors.
The Alpha Epsilon Delta Chapter of Phi Alpha Theta, international honor society in History, was established at Rhodes in 1990. Phi Alpha Theta brings students, teachers, and writers of history together both intellectually and socially, and it encourages and assists historical research and publication by its members. Students who have completed the required number of history hours at the 3.3 level and maintain at least a 3.2 overall grade point average are eligible for membership. Student members host informational gatherings for first-year students, hold career workshops, sponsor speakers, and publish an annual journal of exemplary student papers.

Beta Beta Beta is an honorary and professional society for students of the biological sciences. The Mu Rho Chapter of this national society was founded at Rhodes College in 1992. It seeks to encourage scholarly attainment in this field of learning by reserving its regular membership for those who achieve superior academic records and who indicate special aptitude for and major interest in the life sciences.

Pi Delta Phi is an honorary society for students of French language, literature, and culture. The Nu Nu chapter of this national society was founded at Rhodes in 2004. The purpose of the society is to recognize outstanding scholarship in the French language and its literatures, increase the knowledge and appreciation of Americans for the cultural contributions of the French-speaking world, and to stimulate and encourage French and francophone cultural activities.

Iota Iota Iota is a national honor society that recognizes academic excellence in the field of women’s studies while striving to maintain the feminist values central to women’s studies: egalitarianism, inclusiveness, and a celebration of the diversity of women’s experiences. Iota Iota Iota works to promote an interest in women’ s studies and research in social problems affecting all women. The Chi Chapter of Iota Iota Iota was chartered at Rhodes College in 2004.

Delta Phi Alpha, the National German Honor Society seeks to recognize excellence in the study of German and to provide an incentive for higher scholarship. The Society aims to promote the study of the German language, literature and civilization and endeavors to emphasize those aspects of German life and culture which are of universal value and which contribute to man’s eternal search for peace and truth.
Dobro Slovo, the National Slavic Honor Society, is an honorary organization for talented undergraduate and graduate students in the Slavic languages. It serves as a means for the recognition of academic excellence in the study of Slavic languages, literature, and history, and provides incentive for scholarly interest in Slavic life and culture. The Rhodes Chapter of the society was established in 2003.

Sigma Delta Pi is the national collegiate honorary society for students who distinguish themselves in the study of Hispanic language, literature and culture. The society was founded in 1919 at The University of California, and the Phi Epsilon chapter was established at Rhodes in 2005.

Theta Alpha Kappa is the only national honor society serving the needs of those involved in the study of religion and/or theology at both the baccalaureate and post-baccalaureate levels of higher education. Honoring excellence in these academic fields is its primary purpose, and it currently hosts over 140 local chapters throughout the United States at institutions both large and small, public and private. The Rhodes chapter, Alpha Epsilon Iota, was created in 2000 and serves approximately 40 members. Candidates for admission to Theta Alpha Kappa must have an overall GPA of at least 3.0, at least 12 credit hours in Religious Studies (including Humanities “Search” courses) and at least a 3.5 GPA in those classes.

Nu Rho Psi, national Neuroscience honor society, was established at Rhodes in 2014.  The Rhodes chapter will be the first for Tennessee.  The objectives of Nu Rho Psi are to encourage professional interest and excellence in scholarship in neuroscience, award recognition to students who have achieved such excellence, promote intellectual and social interaction between students, faculty, and professionals in the field, and encourage service to the community.

Academic Advising and Support

Academic Advising

The mission of academic advising at Rhodes is to promote student learning. Each entering student is assigned an academic adviser, who will function in that capacity until the student formally declares a major. This must be done prior to the registration period of the spring semester of the sophomore year. At that point, a faculty adviser from the major department is assigned to or selected by the student.

Assisted by the academic adviser, the student learns:

  • To understand the nature of a liberal arts education;
  • To assess his or her strengths and weaknesses;
  • To formulate educational and career goals;
  • To plan a course of action to achieve those goals.

Career Advising

Rhodes graduates have prominence in their chosen professional fields. The top occupational classifications for graduates are Business, Education (on all levels), Law, Medicine and Health Sciences, and Public Relations and Writing.

In addition to the programs and services offered by Career Services, students can seek pre-professional advisement from designated faculty advisers.

The academic program at Rhodes offers a variety of courses that may be used as preparation for graduate study or as preparation for particular professional careers. The prerequisites for professional courses of study vary greatly, not only among the various professions but also among individual institutions preparing students for the professions. Therefore, the faculty adviser should be consulted as soon as a student has decided upon aims for the future, in order that the best course of study may be planned according to individual purposes and needs.

In some cases very specific recommendations for pre-professional courses have been developed: Medicine and the Health Sciences, Business, and Law. The advisers named below have this information and should be consulted early in one’s undergraduate work.

Pre-Professional Advisers

  • Accounting: Professor Pam Church
  • Architecture: Professor Ryan Rasmussen
  • Business:
    • Accounting: Professor Pam Church
    • Finance: Professors Pam Church and Jade Planchon
    • Management: Professor Dee Birnbaum
    • Marketing: Professor Sujan Dan
  • Education: Professors Natalie Person and Zachary Casey
  • Engineering: Professor Elizabeth Young
  • Foreign Service: Professor Stephen Ceccoli
  • Health Care Management: Professor Dee Birnbaum
  • Health Professions: Professors Alan Jaslow and Charles Snyder
  • Law: Professor Anna Smith (assisted by Professors Marcus Pohlmann and Tim Huebner)
  • Ministry and Church-Related Professions: Professor Stephen Haynes and Chaplain Lucy Webb
  • Museum Careers: Professors Victor Coonin and David McCarthy
  • Music: Professor Courtenay Harter
  • Public History: Professor Jeffrey Jackson
  • Psychological Services: Professor Rylan Testa
  • Social Services: Professor Thomas McGowan
  • Theatre: Professor Joy Brooke Fairfield
  • Veterinary Medicine: Professor Alan Jaslow

Preparation for Graduate Study

A student who plans to do graduate work leading to one of the advanced academic degrees should confer with the faculty adviser during the student’s first year if possible, and certainly before entering the junior year. The student’s undergraduate program should be planned in such a way as to include a maximum of study in the chosen major field and in related fields without lessening general knowledge of other fields. Since most graduate schools require a reading knowledge of at least one foreign language for all advanced degrees, the faculty adviser of the prospective graduate student should be consulted regarding the most appropriate foreign language(s) as early as possible in the college career.

The prospective graduate student should consider applying for the Honors Program. The Honors Program provides an opportunity to do more independent, intensive, and individual work than can be done in the regular degree programs. The honors work offers an excellent introduction to graduate study as it employs the full resources of library and laboratory, and encourages independent research and study. The Honors Program is more fully described in the section on Opportunities for Individualized Study.

Academic Support

Academic support services are available to all students through the academic advising system, the Counseling Center, individual meetings with faculty members, workshops, and peer tutoring programs. Many of these services are provided or coordinated by the Office of Student Academic Support. Students who find themselves in academic difficulty may receive assistance from a wide variety of programs in such areas as study skills and time management as well as personal academic counseling and assistance to achieve greater academic success.

 




PLEASE NOTE: This document reflects information as it was published in the 2015-16 Rhodes Catalogue. You may find more current information elsewhere on rhodes.edu.

Academic Calendar, 2016-2017

Fall Semester, 2016

Opening Faculty Meeting August 17, Wednesday
Orientation for New Students August 19-23 Friday-Tuesday
*Opening Convocation August 19, Friday
Classes Begin August 24, Wednesday
Drop/Add Period Ends August 30, Tuesday
**Enrollment Clearance Ends August 30, Tuesday
Extended Drop Period Begins August 31, Wednesday
Labor Day Recess September 5, Monday
Pass/Fail Option Ends September 14, Wednesday
Extended Drop Period Ends September 14, Wednesday
Withdraw Period Begins September 15, Thursday
Last Day to Remove Conditional Grades September 21, Wednesday
End of First Seven Weeks Classes October 12, Wednesday
Mid-Term Grades Due October 14, Friday, 5 p.m.
Fall Recess Begins October 14, Friday, 10:00 p.m.
Classes Resume October 19, Wednesday
Spring, 2017, Registration Begins October 26, Wednesday
Withdraw Period Ends October 28, Friday
Thanksgiving Recess Begins November 22, Tuesday, 10:00 p.m.
Classes Resume November 28, Monday
Classes End December 7, Wednesday, 10:00 p.m.
Reading Day December 8, Thursday
Final Examinations December 9-14, Friday-Wednesday
End of Fall Semester December 14, Wednesday
Final Grades Due December 16, Friday, 5:00 p.m.

Spring Semester, 2017

Classes Begin January 11, Wednesday
Martin Luther King Day Observance January 16, Monday
Drop/Add Period Ends January 18, Wednesday
**Enrollment Clearance Deadline January 18, Wednesday
Extended Drop Period Begins January 19, Thursday
Pass/Fail Option Ends February 1, Wednesday
Extended Drop Period Ends February 1, Wednesday
Withdraw Period Begins February 2, Thursday
Last Day to Remove Conditional Grades February 8, Wednesday
End of First Seven Weeks Classes March 1, Wednesday
Mid-Term Grades Due March 3, Friday, 5:00 p.m.
Spring Recess Begins March 3, Friday, 10:00 p.m.
Classes Resume March 13, Monday
Fall, 2017, Registration Begins March 22, Wednesday
Withdraw Period Ends March 24, Friday
Easter Recess Begins April 12, Wednesday, 10:00 p.m.
Classes Resume April 17, Monday
Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity Symposium April 28, Friday
*Awards Convocation April 28, Friday, 9:00 a.m.
Reading Days April 29, Saturday, and May 4, Thursday
Final Examinations May 1 - May 6, Monday-Saturday
End of Spring Semester May 6, Saturday
Final Grades Due May 8, Monday, 9:00 a.m.
*Baccalaureate Service May 12, Friday, 3:30 p.m.
*Commencement May 13, Saturday, 9:30 a.m.

Summer Term 2017

Session I Begins May 15, Monday
Session 1 Add Ends May 16, Tuesday
Session I Drop and Pass/Fail Ends May 19, Friday
Memorial Day Holiday, No Classes May 29, Monday
Session I Withdraw Period Ends June 2, Friday
Session I Last Day of Classes June 16, Friday
Session I Final Exams June 17, Saturday
Session I Final Grades Due June 19, Monday, Noon
Session II Begins June 21, Wednesday
Session II Add Ends June 22, Thursday
Session II Drop and Pass/Fail Ends June 27, Tuesday
Independence Day Holiday, No Classes July 4, Tuesday
Session II Withdraw Ends July 11, Tuesday
Session II Classes End July 25, Tuesday
Session II Final Exams July 26, Wednesday
Session II Final Grades Due July 28, Friday, Noon
Full Session Final Grades Due August 4, Friday, 5 p.m.

* Formal Academic Occasion
**Required of all students

2017-2018

Fall Semester, 2017

Opening Faculty Meeting

August 16, Wednesday

Orientation for New Students

August 18-22 Friday-Tuesday

*Opening Convocation

August 18, Friday

Classes Begin

August 23, Wednesday

Drop/Add Period Ends

August 29, Tuesday

**Enrollment Clearance Ends

August 29, Tuesday

Extended Drop Period Begins

August 30, Wednesday

Labor Day Recess

September 4, Monday

Pass/Fail Option Ends

September 13, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.

Extended Drop Period Ends

September 13, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.

Withdraw Period Begins

September 14, Thursday

Last Day to Remove Conditional Grades

September 20, Wednesday

End of First Seven Weeks Classes

October 11, Wednesday

Mid-Term Grades Due

October 13, Friday, 5 p.m.

Fall Recess Begins

October 13, Friday, 10:00 p.m.

Classes Resume

October 18, Wednesday

Spring, 2018, Registration Begins

October 25, Wednesday

Withdraw Period Ends

October 27, Friday, 5:00 p.m. 

Thanksgiving Recess Begins

November 21, Tuesday, 10:00 p.m.

Classes Resume

November 27, Monday

Classes End

December 6, Wednesday, 10:00 p.m.

Reading Day

December 7, Thursday

Final Examinations

December 8-13, Friday-Wednesday

End of Fall Semester

December 13, Wednesday

Final Grades Due

December 15, Friday, 5:00 p.m.

Spring Semester, 2018

Classes Begin

January 10, Wednesday

Martin Luther King Day Observance

January 15, Monday

Drop/Add Period Ends

January 17, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.

**Enrollment Clearance Deadline

January 17, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.

Extended Drop Period Begins

January 18, Thursday

Pass/Fail Option Ends

January 31, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.

Extended Drop Period Ends

January 31, Wednesday, 5:00 p.m.

Withdraw Period Begins

February 1, Thursday

Last Day to Remove Conditional Grades

February 7, Wednesday

End of First Seven Weeks Classes

February 28, Wednesday

Mid-Term Grades Due

March 2, Friday, 5:00 p.m.

Spring Recess Begins

March 2, Friday, 10:00 p.m.

Classes Resume

March 12, Monday

Fall 2018 Registration Begins

March 21, Wednesday

Withdraw Period Ends

March 23, Friday

Easter Recess Begins

March 28, Wednesday, 10:00 p.m.

Classes Resume

April 2, Monday

Undergraduate Research and Creative Activity Symposium

April 27, Friday

*Awards Convocation

April 27, Friday, 9:00 a.m.

Reading Days

April 28, Saturday and May 3, Thursday

Final Examinations

April 30 - May 5, Monday-Saturday

End of Spring Semester

May 5, Saturday

Final Grades Due

May 7, Monday, 9:00 a.m.

*Baccalaureate Service

May 11, Friday, 3:30 p.m.

*Commencement

May 12, Saturday, 9:30 a.m.

Summer Term, 2018 

Session I Begins

May 14, Monday

Session 1 Add Ends

May 15, Tuesday

Session I Drop and Pass/Fail Ends

May 18, Friday

Memorial Day Holiday, No Classes

May 28, Monday

Session I Withdraw Period Ends

June 1, Friday

Session I Last Day of Classes

June 15, Friday

Session I Final Exams

June 16, Saturday

Session I Final Grades Due

June 18, Monday, Noon

Session II Begins

June 20, Wednesday

Session II Add Ends

June 21, Thursday

Session II Drop and Pass/Fail Ends

June 26, Tuesday

Independence Day Holiday, No Classes

July 4, Wednesday

Session II Withdraw Ends

July 10, Tuesday

Session II Classes End

July 24, Tuesday

Session II Final Exams

July 25, Wednesday

Session II Final Grades Due

July 27, Friday, Noon

Full Session Final Grades Due

August 3, Friday, 5 p.m.

* Formal Academic Occasion
**Required of all students

Campus Regulations

Student Conduct

The College expects all students to conduct themselves as responsible citizens of an academic community. Persistent or extreme departures from this standard will lead to restrictions and may result in suspension or expulsion. Rhodes reserves the right to exclude at any time persons whose conduct is undesirable. In such cases, no refunds of tuition, fees, or room and board will be made, and the College, its students, faculty, administrative judicial committees and officers shall not be under any liability.

The administration of rules pertaining to student behavior is chiefly the responsibility of the Dean of Students, Director of Community Standards, administrative designees, the Honor Council and the Social Regulations Council.

This section of the College Catalogue is intended only to provide a broad overview. The Student Handbook, available on the College web site, contains all policies pertinent to students.

The Honor Council and Social Regulations Council

The students of Rhodes assume responsibility for honorable conduct in campus life. They elect an Honor Council and a Social Regulations Council. Each Council is composed of elected representatives from each of the four classes. The Councils investigate alleged infractions of the Honor and Social Regulations Codes, and enforce regulations with sanctions up to and including expulsion. The decision may be appealed to the Faculty Appeals Committee or a designated Appeals Committee, respectively. These committees may return cases to the appropriate Council for reconsideration, and in that case the Council’s decision is final. Every entering student is expected at the time of matriculation to sign a pledge promising to uphold the Diversity Statement, the Honor Code, and the Social Regulations Code.

Statement on Alcohol Use

A complete description of the Rhodes College Alcohol Policy can be found in the Student Handbook available on the College web site. As a community we embrace the vision of a healthy and balanced social environment, grounded in trust and open communication among faculty, staff, and students. Such an environment fosters personal and community growth and embodies a sense of responsibility and accountability to self and others. This vision depends upon each member's commitment to achieve and maintain inclusiveness, consistency, continual education, and the growth of shared traditions. This is our duty to one another. Rhodes College supports behaviors that are legal, responsible, healthy, and reflective of our community values.

Rhodes is committed to providing the members of its community with factual information about alcohol as well as confidential referrals for professional assistance in the event that it is needed. An awareness of the positive and negative effects of alcohol consumption may assist in efforts to make safe and responsible choices about alcohol. Educational programs are organized and conducted annually to promote continued awareness and encourage an attitude of genuine concern and care for others.

Statement on Drug Use

The possession, use, sale or distribution of illegal drugs, the misuse or abuse of medications or other legal drugs on the Rhodes campus is prohibited. Such conduct:

  • Violates the law;
  • Violates one’s physical and mental health; and,
  • Violates the fabric of the community with serious security risks resulting from dealing with individuals operating outside the law.

The students, faculty and staff of Rhodes, as citizens, are responsible for knowing and complying with all applicable state and local laws that make it a crime to possess, sell, deliver or manufacture those drugs considered to be controlled substances by the state of Tennessee. Any member of the Rhodes community who violates the law is subject to both prosecution and punishment by civil authorities and to disciplinary proceedings by the College.

Sexual Misconduct Policy

Rhodes College is committed to providing a working, educational, social, and residential environment for all members of our College community, including all faculty, staff, and students, that is free from sexual harassment. Sexual harassment or assault in any form is unacceptable behavior and will not be tolerated. It is a form of misconduct that undermines the institutional mission of the College. The complete sexual misconduct policy may be found in the Student Handbook.

Fraternization Policy

Rhodes College prohibits romantic, sexual, and exploitative relationships between college employees and students. In the event that any such relationship is reported and confirmed the college employee is subject to employee disciplinary procedures up to and including termination in the case of administrators and staff members, or dismissal for cause in the case of faculty members. There are exceptional circumstances in which the spouse or partner of a college employee is a student at the College. This policy does not apply in such circumstances. The Dean of the College, in consultation with the Director of Human Resources, is the administrative officer who determines whether an exceptional circumstance applies. The complete fraternization policy and employee discipline policy are available in the Student Handbook.

Involuntary Withdrawal or Removal From Campus

The College occasionally faces the problem of students who pose a threat to themselves or others, who are unable to cope, or who create a pattern of extreme disruption. If such behavior constitutes a violation of College rules and regulations, the case will be referred to the Dean of Students or the Dean’s designee for action.

If the student’s behavior occurs without such violation, if the student does not respond to the charges against him or her, or if the student did not know the nature or quality of the conduct in question at the time of occurrence, the Dean of Students will investigate the situation and the effect or the potential effect of the behavior on the student and the College community. The Dean may require a personal interview with the student and/or an evaluation of the student by a qualified professional. The Dean may require an interim removal of the student from campus pending conclusion of the investigation.

If, as a result of this investigation, the Dean of Students determines that the student’s behavior indicates substantial risk of threat to self or others, or that the individual is otherwise unable to fulfill the expectations of a student at Rhodes, the pursuit of professional care or a withdrawal from the College may be recommended. The student will be provided with the option of voluntarily withdrawing from the College for the remainder of the term. If the student refuses to do so, the Dean of Students will consult with other College staff members as deemed appropriate. They will recommend to the Dean of Students a course of action, which may include removal of the student from the College with conditions for readmission. If the student withdraws, he or she may be referred to an appropriate facility for additional assistance. The parents will be notified as soon as possible and must assume responsibility for the student’s care.

Students who leave campus under the above conditions, either voluntarily or involuntarily, may be readmitted to the College only after being cleared by the Dean of Students and, when appropriate, the Committee on Standards and Standing. Permission for readmission will typically be based on the student’s demonstrating a period of responsible behavior outside the College and may require a statement from a physician, psychologist, or other qualified professional that the student is ready to return and cope with college life. Follow-up assessment or services may be required as part of the readmission decision.
Removal of a student from the College will be undertaken only as a last resort. Every effort should be made to help students understand the consequences of their behavior, make responsible decisions, and develop skills that will allow them to remain and function in the Rhodes community.

Students who have voluntarily withdrawn or who have been removed from campus are not allowed to attend class and have no access to the campus or College sanctioned or sponsored events.

Campus Communication

There are two official means of communication on the Rhodes campus: campus mail and e-mail using Rhodes’ accounts. All students, faculty, and staff have a personal e-mail address on the Rhodes e-mail system, and students are expected to check this account on a regular basis.

Most official notices to individuals and to the campus community are sent via e-mail, and such correspondence is considered official. In addition to e-mail, some official notices, communication, and information are sent via campus mail. For this reason, all students are required to maintain a P.O. Box with the mailroom located in Burrow Hall.

Residency Requirement

Living on campus is a vital part of the college experience and aids the student’s adjustment to college. Therefore, all first-time first year students at Rhodes must live on campus for their first two full academic years. Transfer students must live in College housing until they have completed two full academic years; previous enrollment at other institutions counts toward fulfilling this requirement.

Exchange students must reside in College housing for the duration of their enrollment at Rhodes.

All rising sophomore resident students are expected to participate in the housing lottery process to comply with the residency requirement. In the event that a student does not participate in housing lottery, a space will be selected for the student by the Director of Residence Life. The student will be notified of the room and meal plan assignment in writing.

Services for Students With Disabilities

Rhodes is committed to ensuring that educational programs are accessible to all qualified students in accordance with the provisions of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act of 1973 and expanded by Title III of the Americans with Disabilities Act of 1990 (ADA) and the ADA Amendments Act of 2008 (ADAAA). To guard against discrimination on the basis of disability, reasonable and appropriate accommodations, academic adjustments, and/or auxiliary aids are determined on a case-by-case basis for students who have a demonstrated need for these services. It is the student’s responsibility to initiate any request for accommodation due to a qualifying disability. Prospective students with questions about special needs or accommodations should contact the Office of Admissions.

Once students are enrolled, the Director of Student Disability Services is the point of contact for students with physical, psychological, learning and attentional disabilities. The Director of Student Disability Services confers with students on an individual basis, then together with the Disability Support Committee, determines appropriate accommodations and identifies needed resources. Accommodations are designed to meet the student’s needs without fundamentally altering the nature of the College’s instructional programs and are determined on an individual basis. Since arrangements for reasonable accommodations may require several weeks of preparation, students who have been admitted to the College and who wish to request special services should contact the Director of Student Disability Services as soon as possible after admission.

Students with disabilities who seek accommodations from Rhodes must submit current, comprehensive documentation from a certified professional to the Director of Student Disability Services. This documentation will be used as a guide to develop an appropriate and supportive plan for the student. The Disability Support Committee will use this documentation as a guide to develop an appropriate and supportive plan for the student. Documentation requirements and additional information on services provided by the College to enrolled students with disabilities are available in the Student Disability Services Office and online at www.rhodes.edu/disability.

Programs of Study

A course at Rhodes is an academic activity undertaken by a student that is structured, directed, advised, and evaluated by a faculty member. Typically, a course requires a student to read, listen, discuss, and write while learning and developing specific abilities and sensibilities and while internalizing information and ideas from the specific subject areas outlined in the course syllabus. These activities require many hours of work over a semester and involve regular meetings with the faculty member and other enrolled students. The meetings or class sessions provide opportunities for lecture by faculty, discussion among students, student presentations, and other activities directly related to students’ learning that are naturally done in a collective setting. Class meetings and the final examination period together usually constitute only one-fourth to one-third of the time spent on a course, so the majority of time a student dedicates to a course is outside of the classroom or laboratory. Measured in academic credit, a typical student’s work load each semester is sixteen credits. Such a load corresponds to approximately fifty to fifty-five hours of work per week and is consistent with the understanding that a student’s academic work is considered to be his or her full-time job while enrolled in the College.

One credit is equivalent to one semester hour. A student is expected to spend a minimum of forty-six hours in academic study for every hour of academic credit. This principle applies to directed inquiries, tutorial study, and to all courses in the curriculum.

The College reserves the right to cancel any course for which there is insufficient enrollment.

“Fall” and “Spring” below the course titles indicate the semester in which the course is normally taught. However, course offerings are affected by semester or annual staffing patterns, so the semester class schedule should be consulted for the official course offerings for any one semester. Course credit is shown at the right of the line.

Courses taught in a two-semester sequence are normally scheduled with the Fall Semester course being the first in the sequence. In most cases, the second course in the sequence requires successful completion of the first course, but there are some sequential courses that allow the second course to be taken first. The course descriptions will identify such courses. Credit is given for half of a hyphenated course should the student not enroll the following semester.

Course Numbering

Normally courses numbered in the one-hundreds and two-hundreds are for first and second year students; those in the three-hundreds and four-hundreds are for juniors and seniors. Courses numbered above 500 are graduate-level courses and are open only to students admitted to the graduate program. Courses numbered above 800 are courses designed for and offered only to students attending any of the various Rhodes foreign study programs.

In general, courses numbered in the one-hundreds and two-hundreds are offered yearly. Higher level courses are frequently offered every other year. Students making long range plans for majors are urged to consult with the chairperson of the department for information concerning the sequence of offerings.

From time to time, special topics courses are offered by faculty members. These courses are not listed in the catalogue by title or description. They are conducted in a manner consistent with regular course offerings, governed by normal class schedules and examination policies; however, they may not be used to satisfy degree requirements unless so specified at the time the course was approved. Special topics courses are also used for transfer credit in some cases where no exact equivalent course is offered in the Rhodes curriculum.

Because the course topics and content vary from year to year, the courses offered through the British Studies at Oxford are not described in this catalogue. These courses are numbered from 800 to 899. Course descriptions of offerings of this program are available from the Office of British Studies or from the Registrar at Rhodes. In addition, several departments offer “Topics” courses for which the course description varies from semester to semester. Those course descriptions may be available from the appropriate department or faculty member.

Foundation Courses

Only certain courses in the Rhodes curriculum and in each department are approved to meet Foundation requirements. Each of these courses is designated in the course description in this catalog and on the class schedule for each semester online. It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of what courses in which they may be enrolled satisfy foundation requirements. Such courses are submitted by faculty members to the Foundations Curriculum Committee for approval. It is not possible for students to request foundation credit approval by the Committee for any coursework with the exception of Foundation 11. Self-initiated requests for F11 credit for certain coursework or experiences may be requested using the appropriate form available online. 
Directed Inquiries may not be used unless requested by the department and approved by the Foundations Curriculum Committee. With very few exceptions, the courses designated as fulfilling degree requirements carry four credits. An accumulation of one-credit applied music may be used to satisfy the Fine Arts or the F5 requirements.

Class Schedules

Courses carrying four credits normally meet for a total of 150 minutes per week. The four-credit classes meeting three days per week meet for fifty minutes during each class period. Those four-credit classes meeting two days per week meet for seventy-five minutes during each class period. Others will meet four or five times per week on other daily schedules. Laboratory courses carrying four credits will also meet one or two afternoons per week for the laboratory. The amount of credit does not necessarily equate to the time spent in the classroom. Outside of class assignments, readings, service-learning opportunities, and other activities supplement the actual class time.

The Academic Calendar

The academic year consists of two semesters, each containing fourteen weeks of instruction and a fifteenth week devoted to examinations. The first semester begins in late August and ends in mid-December; the second semester begins in January and ends in early May. A detailed calendar including dates of recesses and special academic days may be found elsewhere in the College catalogue or on the Rhodes web site. Students normally enroll in four courses, totaling sixteen credits, each semester. In each academic year a student should plan to earn a minimum of thirty-two credits in order to meet all graduation requirements in the standard four-year undergraduate program.

 

Anthropology and Sociology

Anthropology and Sociology offers students an opportunity to learn how to interpret and explain the structural and environmental forces that influence human action, and that have resulted in myriad cultural forms. 

Anthropology/Sociology: Faculty and Staff

Professor

Susan M. Kus. 1984. B.A., University of Michigan; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Michigan. (Archaeology, state formation, symbolic anthropology, ethno-archaeology, sub-Saharan Africa and Madagascar.)

Associate Professor

Jeanne Lopiparo. 2009. Chair. B.A., Harvard University; M.A. and Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley. (Archaeology of Mexico and Central America, social archaeology, material culture, household archaeology.)
Thomas G. McGowan. 1988. B.A., M.S.S.R., Hunter College, City University of New York; Ph.D., University of New Hampshire. (Interpretive sociology, medical sociology, community-integrative education, evaluation research.) 
Evelyn Perry. 2010. B.A., Colorado College; M.A. and Ph.D., Indiana University. (Community and urban sociology, culture, inequality, race and ethnic relations, social theory.)

Assistant Professors

Kimberly C. Kasper. 2011. B.A., Fordham University; M.Sc. Florida State University; M.Sc, Sheffield University; Ph.D., University of Massachusetts, Amherst. (Human-environmental interactions, paleoethnobotany, spatial analysis, North American archaeology, ethics.)
Zandria F. Robinson. 2015. B.A. and M.A., University of Memphis; Ph.D., Northwestern University. (Race, class, gender, popular culture and sociology of culture, feminist theory, urban sociology.)

Staff

Sean Hardwick. Departmental Assistant

Requirements for a Minor in Anthropology/Sociology

A total of twenty-four (24) credits as follows:

  1. Anthropology/Sociology 103 and 105.
  2. One of the following courses: Anthropology/Sociology 380, Anthropology/Sociology 391, Anthropology/Sociology 392,  Anthropology/Sociology 393, or other theoretically intensive course by petition.
    (To be taken junior or senior year)
  3. Three additional courses (12 credits) in Anthropology/Sociology.

Requirements for a Major in Anthropology/Sociology

A total of fifty (50) credits as follows:

  1. Anthropology/Sociology 103 and 105.
  2. Anthropology/Sociology 351.
    (To be taken junior year)
  3. One of the following methods courses: Anthropology/Sociology 352, Anthropology/Sociology 254, Interdisciplinary Studies 225, or other methodologically intensive course by petition.
    (Ideally taken junior year)
  4. Anthropology/Sociology 380.
    (To be taken junior year)
  5. Anthropology/Sociology 485 and 486.
    (To be taken senior year)
  6. Six additional courses (24 credits) in Anthropology/Sociology.

The six elective courses are chosen in conference with departmental faculty members and should reflect the student’s specific interests and needs. Students may count the following courses as electives towards the major: Field Research in Environmental Archaeology (ARCE 120), Learning From Things: Material Culture Studies (ARCE 210), Archaeological Methods (ARCE 220), Archaeological Field School (ARCE 450), Geographic Information Systems (INTD 225).

Honors in Anthropology/Sociology

  1. Completion of all requirements for a Bachelor of Arts degree in Anthropology and Sociology, as well as a minimum overall grade point average of 3.50 and a minimum anthropology and sociology grade point average of 3.50.
  2. Completion of Anthropology/Sociology 495 - 496
  3. Completion of a substantial research project and paper in an area of special interest to the candidate.

Art and Art History

The Department of Art and Art History offers to the student, regardless of experience or major, the opportunity to develop a sensitivity to visual language through studio work and the study of the history of art.

Art and Art History: Faculty and Staff

Professor

David P. McCarthy. 1991. B.A., Gettysburg College; Ph.D., University of Delaware. (Modern, contemporary, and American art history.)

Associate Professors

A. Victor Coonin. 1995. B.A., Oberlin College; M.A. Syracuse University; Ph.D., Rutgers University. (Medieval, Renaissance, and Baroque art history.)
Erin Harmon. 2003. Chair. B.A., San Diego State University; M.F.A., Rhode Island School of Design. (Painting and Drawing.)

Assistant Professors

Joel Parsons. 2014. B.A., Rhodes College; M.F.A., School of the Art Institute of Chicago. (Sculpture and Performance.)
Miriam G. Clinton. 2015. B.A., Yale University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania (Art and Archaeology of the Mediterranean World.)
Ryan Rasmussen. 2015. B.F.A., University of Minnesota; M.F.A., University of Iowa. (Sculpture and Drawing.)
Darren Douglas Floyd. 2016. B.A., The College of Wooster; M.F.A., Temple University. (Digital Arts, Video, Film and New Media.)

Director, Clough-Hanson Gallery

Joel Parsons. 2014. B.A., Rhodes College; M.F.A., School of the Art Institute of Chicago. (Sculpture and Performance.)

Curator, Visual Resources Collection

Rosanna Parrella Meindl. 2014. B.A., Lewis and Clark College; M.A., University of Oregon (Asian Studies.)

Staff

Stephanie Cage. Departmental Assistant.

The Clough-Hanson Gallery, located in Clough Hall, brings to campus exhibitions of contemporary art from September through March. In April and early May, the gallery hosts two student exhibitions: the Juried Student Exhibit and the Senior Thesis Exhibit.

The Department of Art and Art History offers three majors to meet students’ particular interests and post-graduate goals: Art, Art History, and a combined Art and Art History sequence.

Requirements for a Major in Art

For the student interested in art as a vocation, for teaching, or for further study in graduate school, a program of studies is preferable. The following courses are required.

A total of forty-eight (48) credits as follows:

  1. Studio Art: two of the following 100-level courses: 101, 105, 107.
  2. 485, 486.
  3. Art History: 151, 152.
  4. Three additional courses in studio at the 200 level or above (at least one of which must be at the 300 level)
  5. Three additional courses in the department of Art and Art History (of which no more than one may be Art History with the exception of the Art 260-Curation in Context course, or by petition.)

Requirements for a Major in Art History

For those students interested in the study of art history with graduate school as a possible goal, this program of study is suggested. The following courses are required.

A total of forty-eight (48) credits as follows:

  1. Studio Art: 101 and either 105 or 107.
  2. Art History: 151, 152, 218, 223, 242, 485,
  3. One additional course in each of the three areas, at least one of which must be 300 level:
    1. Ancient studies (Prehistoric through Roman.) (may include 209, 219, 220, 353, and 265/365-Special Topics in Ancient Art History.)
    2. Medieval through Baroque. (may include 221, 226, 228, 356, 265/365-Special Topics in Medieval through Baroque Art History.)
    3. Modern (post 1800.) (may include 234, 241, 245, 330, 260, 265/365-Special Topics in Modern Art History.)
  4. One additional course in Art History at 200 level or above.

German and/or French through the 201-level are strongly recommended for those students planning to pursue graduate work in art history.

Requirements for a Major in Art and Art History

A total of sixty-four (64) credits as follows:

  1. Studio Art: 101 and either 105 or 107.
  2. Art 485, Art 486, and Art History 485.
  3. Art History: 151, 152, 218, 223, 242.
  4. Three additional courses in studio at the 200 level or above (at least one of which must be at the 300 level.)
  5. Three additional courses in the department of Art and Art History at the 200 level or above.

Requirements for a Minor in Art

A total of twenty-eight (28) credits as follows:

  1. Studio Art: two of the following: 101, 105, 107.
  2. Art History: either 151 or 152.
  3. 485.
  4. Three additional courses in studio Art at 200-level or above.

Requirements for a Minor in Art History

A total of twenty-eight (28) credits as follows:

  1. Art: one of the following: 101, 105, 107.
  2. Art History: 151, 152, 218, 223, 242.
  3. 485.

Honors in Art and Art History

  1. In the spring of the junior year, an art major, in consultation with an appropriate member of the art faculty, may write a proposal for honors work in the senior year. The department must approve the proposal.
  2. An overall grade of A- on the thesis or project itself is required for honors credit.
 

Biology

As one of the most popular majors on campus, the Biology Department offers students opportunities to learn about all levels of biology, as well as modern methods of research and investigation. The study of biology prepares students for a wide range of career options.

 

Biology: Faculty and Staff

Professors

Terry W. Hill. 1978. B.A., University of South Florida; M.S., Ph.D., University of Florida. (Cell biology, microbiology, biology of fungi.)
Carolyn R. Jaslow. 1988. Chair. B.A., Mount Holyoke College; M.S., Ohio University; Ph.D., University of Chicago. (Histology, reproductive biology, embryology, mammalogy.)
Gary J. Lindquester. 1988. B.S., Furman University; M.S., Ph.D., Emory University. (Molecular biology, virology, immunology.)
Mary Miller. 2001. B.A., University of Tennessee; Ph.D., University of Virginia. (Genetics, microbiology, cancer biology, cell biology.)

Associate Professors

Sarah Boyle. 2009. B.A., College of William and Mary; Ph.D., Arizona State University. (Ecology, conservation biology, tropical field biology.)
Michael D. Collins. 2010. B.S., University of Arizona; M.S., Florida State University; Ph.D., University of Tennessee. (Ecology, ornithology, wildlife biology, statistics.)
Jonathan Fitz Gerald. 2007. B.S., University of California at Irvine; Ph.D., University of Chicago. (Plant biology, development.)
Alan P. Jaslow. 1984. B.S., University of Wisconsin; M.S., Ph.D., University of Michigan. (Vertebrate biology, functional morphology, animal communication.)
David Kabelik. 2009. H.B.Sc., University of Toronto; Ph.D., Arizona State University. (Neuroscience, endocrinology, physiology, animal behavior.)

Assistant Professors

Kelly A. Dougherty. 2014. B.S., West Chester University; Ph.D., Thomas Jefferson University. (Neuroscience, biophysics, neurophysiology.)
Elaine R. Frawley. 2016. B.A., Ph.D., Washington University in St. Louis. (Microbiology, molecular biology, bacterial pathogenesis.)
Stephanie Haddad. 2017. B.S., M.S., American University of Beirut; Ph.D. University of Memphis. (Entomology, evolutionary biology, systematics and phylogenetics.)
Erin S. Honsa. 2016. B.S., Queensland University of Technology (Australia); Ph.D., Baylor College of Medicine. (Microbiology, infectious disease.)
David A. Pike. 2016. B.S., North Carolina State University; M.S., Towson University; Ph.D., University of Sydney Australia. (Ecology, wildlife biology, herpetology.)
Graham Tuttle. 2017. B.S., State University of New York College of Environmental Science and Forestry; Ph.D., Colorado State University. (Community ecology, invasion ecology, plant biology.)
Bayly S. Wheeler. 2015. B.S.E., University of Michigan; Ph.D., Duke University. (Molecular biology, genetics, genomics, microbiology.)

Staff

Dianne Cox. 2014. Biology Department Assistant. B.A., University of Mississippi.
Sarah Hasty. 2009. Biology Department Lab Manager for Frazier-Jelke Science Center. B.S., Louisiana State University; M.S., University of Memphis.
Justin A. Porter. 2017. Biology Department Lab Manager for Robertson Hall. B.S., M.S., University of Georgia.
 

Requirements for Major in Biology Leading to the B.S. Degree

A total of fifty-three to fifty-seven (53-57) credits as follows:

  1. Biology 130-131L, 140-141L.
  2. Six upper-level courses; at least four of which must have an associated lab experience. Normally four of the six courses used to satisfy these requirements must be taken within the Biology Department at Rhodes. Four credits of Research in Biology (451 or 452) can satisfy one upper-level course with lab requirement. Courses taught outside the department that can satisfy upper level course requirements for the biology major, subject to the limit indicated above, are Chem 416, Chem 414 (Chem 414 with BMB 310 may satisfy a course with lab requirement), ENVS 260, ENVS 270, Neur 270 (Neur 270 with Neur 350 may satisfy a course with lab requirement), and certain courses approved by the Department Chair for transfer credit.
  3. Biology 485 or 486.
  4. Chemistry 120-125L and 211.
  5. One course from Math 111, Math 211, Econ 290, or Psych 211.
  6. One course from Math 115, Math 121, Math 214, or Computer Science 141.

Students, in consultation with their advisers, should select a diversity of upper level courses, thereby gaining experience in different areas of biology. Satisfying the prerequisites for courses is the student’s responsibility; however, in special circumstances, students with advance permission of the instructor may enroll in a course without meeting prerequisites.
Courses and accompanying laboratories of the same name are linked co-requisites and must be taken together unless approved by petition to the department. Unless otherwise noted, courses meet under the standard class schedule and laboratories meet for a three-hour period; laboratories also often require further project work outside the scheduled lab time.
Students seeking a double major must have at least four upper-level courses for the Biology major that are not used to satisfy requirements for the other major.

Business

The Business Department teaches students both theories and methods, as well as the broader social and historical perspectives of business practices in accounting, finance, marketing, and management.

Business: Faculty and Staff

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS

Dee Birnbaum. 1991. B.A., State University of New York at Stony Brook; M.B.A., Baruch College; M.Phil. and Ph.D., City University of New York. (General management, human resource management.)
Pamela H. Church. 1988. Director, M.S. in Accounting Program. B.S. and M.S., University of Memphis; Ph.D., University of Houston. CPA. (Accountancy.)

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS

Kayla D. Booker. 2015. B.B.A., M.P.A., Ph.D., Jackson State University. C.P.A. (Accountancy.)
Sujan M. Dan. 2013. B.Tech, Kerala University, India; M.S., Ph.D., Texas A&M University. (Marketing.)
Denis Khantimirov. 2015. B.A., North Ossetian State University, Russia; M.B.A., University of Nevada, Las Vegas; Ph.D., Old Dominion University. (Marketing.) 
Kelly P. Weeks. 2015. B.A., Rhodes College; M.A. and Ph.D., The University of Memphis. (Management.)
Andrey Zagorchev. 2013. B.S., M.S., Plovdiv University, Bulgaria; M.B.A., Wright State University; Ph.D., Lehigh University. (Finance.)

PART-TIME ASSISTANT PROFESSORS

Jill P. Giles. 2014. B.S. Alfred University; M.B.A. and Ph.D. Rutgers, the State University of New Jersey. CPA. (Accountancy.)
Milton L. Lovell. 2003. B.S., J.D., University of Mississippi. LL.M., New York University School of Law. CFO and General Counsel, NexAir, LLC. (Accountancy, taxation.)

INSTRUCTORS

Margaret O. Lovell. 2017. B.A., Spring Hill College; M.S., Mississippi State University. (Accountancy.)
Jade O. Planchon. 2012. B.A., Rhodes College; M.B.A., Columbia University. (Finance.)

PART-TIME INSTRUCTOR

Chris Nunn. 2010. B.A., M.S., Rhodes College. Chief Financial Officer, Security Bancorp of Tennessee, Inc. (Accountancy.)

STAFF

Linda Gibson. 2006. Departmental Assistant. B.A., Vanderbilt University; M.L.S., George Peabody College.

The Department of Business offers a major in Business. There are two tracks within the Business major: General Business and International Business. In addition, an Interdisciplinary major is offered in Economics/Business.

Master of Science in Accounting. A more concentrated study of accounting may be undertaken in the M.S. in Accounting Program offered by the Department of Business. Students who have completed an undergraduate degree in the Department of Business and/or have taken the appropriate accounting courses can finish the requirements of the M.S. in Accounting degree in two additional semesters of study.

 

Honors in Business

  1. Meet requirements for a major in Business.
  2. Business 495-496.
  3. A substantial research paper in an area of special interest to the candidate.
  4. An oral examination on the research paper.

All honors students must meet eligibility criteria established for the Honors Program.

Requirements for a Major in Business

General Business Track

A total of forty-eight (48) credits as follows:

  1. Business 241, 243, 351, 361, 371, 486.
  2. Economics 100.
  3. Economics 290 or Math 111.
  4. Math 115, 116 or 121.
  5. Two courses from one of the following areas and one course from one of the remaining areas:
    1. Accounting: Business 341, 342.
    2. Finance: Business 452, 454.
    3. Management: Business 463, 466, 467.
    4. Marketing: Business 472, 473, 474.
    5. Business 481.
    6. Business 483.
  6. Recommended: Business 460; Philosophy 206; Computer Science 141, 142; Interdisciplinary 240.

International Business Track

A total of forty-eight (48) credits as follows:

  1. Business 241, 243, 351, 361, 371, 486.
  2. Economics 100.
  3. Economics 290 or Math 111.
  4. Math 115, 116, or 121.
  5. Three courses from: Business 454, 463, 473, 483; Economics 310.
  6. Foreign Language proficiency in or completion of course of study in a modern foreign language through the second full year at the college level.
  7. Recommended: Business 460; Philosophy 206; Computer Science 141, 142; Interdisciplinary 240.

Requirements for a Minor in Business

A total of twenty-eight (28) credit hours as follows:

  1. Business 241, 243, 351, 361, 371.
  2. Economics 100.
  3. Economics 290 or Math 111. 

Chemistry

The Chemistry Department trains students in modern, interdisciplinary chemistry and prepares them for careers in chemistry research, education, and industry, as
well as for further education in chemical, medical, and other health-related fields. 

Chemistry: Faculty and Staff

Professors

Mauricio L. Cafiero. 2004. Chair, Director of Fellowships and Undergraduate Research. B.S., University of North Florida; M.A., and Ph.D., University of Arizona. (Physical Chemistry.)
Darlene M. Loprete. 1990. B.A., Clark University; Ph.D., University of Rhode Island. (Biochemistry.)
Jon Russ. 2004. B.S., Corpus Christi State University; Ph.D., Texas A&M University. (Analytical Chemistry.)

Professor Emeritus

David Y. Jeter. 1973. B.S., Texas A&M University-Commerce; Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. (Inorganic Chemistry.)

Associate Professors

Loretta Jackson-Hayes. 2003. B.S., Tougaloo College; Ph.D., University of Tennessee. (Pharmacology.)
Roberto de la Salud Bea. 2010. B.S. and M.S., University of Valencia, Spain. Ph.D., University of Nebraska. (Organic Chemistry.)

Assistant Professors

Kimberly Brien. 2012. B.S., Texas Lutheran University; M.S., Baylor University; Ph.D.,Texas Christian University. (Organic Chemistry.)
William Eckenhoff. 2015. B.S., Allegheny College; Ph.D. Duquesne University (Inorganic Chemistry).
Dana Horgen. 2014. B.S., Saint Olaf College; Ph.D., Baylor University (Organic Chemistry.)
Dhammika S. Muesse. 2007. B.S. and M.S., University of Colombo; Ph.D., University of Memphis. (Analytical Chemistry.) 
Larryn W. Peterson. 2011. B.A., Carroll College; Ph.D., University of Southern California. (Organic Chemistry.) 
Shana Stoddard. 2015. B.S. Prairie View A&M University; Ph.D. University of Mississippi. (Biochemistry)

Chemistry Storeroom Manager

Jeff R. Goode. B.S., University of Memphis.

Chemistry Instrument Technician and Chemical Safety Officer

Karen Mosely. B.S., University of Memphis; M.S. University of Memphis.

The Department is certified by the American Chemical Society as complying with its requirements for the professional training of chemists.

Honors in Chemistry

  1. Courses required: those listed for the B.S. degree as well as Chemistry 495 and 496.
  2. An original investigation of some problem in chemistry or biochemistry, usually related to research being carried on by a member of the department, is required. A creditable thesis must be presented at the end of the project. The honors project and its outcome must be approved by the student’s Honors Committee.
  3. A public presentation on the honors work is required by the department.

Requirements for Certification by the American Chemical Society

  1. Chemistry 211, 240 and 240L, 311, 408, 414 - these serve as the foundation courses. Then the in-depth courses are 212 and 212L, 312 and 312L, 406 and 415.
  2. Physics 109-110, or 111-112; 113L-114L.
  3. Mathematics 121-122.
  4. Chemistry 485 or 486 or 415.
  5. At least 4 credit hours of research (Chem 451 and/or 452.)

Requirements for a Major in Chemistry Leading to the B.S. Degree

  1. Chemistry 120, 125, 211-212, 212L, 240 and 240L 311-312, 312L,and at least 2 additional courses from the following list: 206, 406, 408, 414, 416, 422, 451-452 (total of four credits.)
  2. Physics 109-110 or 111-112; 113L-114L.
  3. Mathematics 121-122.
  4. Chemistry 485,486 or 415.

These requirements may be tailored to suit the interests and goals of the student. Some suggestions include:

  1. Chemistry graduate school: 406, 408, 414, 451-452.
  2. Biochemistry graduate school in a chemistry department: 414, 416, 451 452. (Note: students interested in graduate biochemistry may also wish to consider the Biochemistry-Molecular Biology major.)

Requirements for a Minor in Chemistry

The minor in Chemistry consists of 6 courses: 120, 211, 212, 240, and 2 additional courses: one must be at least 300-level, and the other may be at the 200-level or above. The final two courses must be at least 4-credit courses.

There are also three required lab courses:125, 240L, and 212L.

Science is increasingly interdisciplinary. Students who wish to pursue careers and/or further study in biology, neuroscience, environmental science, physics or other sciences may see the need to have a firm background in chemistry as well. By declaring a minor, students work with a minor-advisor who will help these students find and define a course of study that can complement their future plans. Students looking to pursue a career in patent or intellectual property or patent law can also benefit by having a chemistry minor.

Requirements for a major in Chemistry, Drug Design track

This major track may be of interest to students interested in a career in pharmaceutical or medicinal chemistry, medicine, pharmacy, or other health professions. Many of the faculty members in the Chemistry department conduct research in this area (6 of the 10 faculty in the department) and so we have research opportunities for students who want to pursue this major.

1. Chem 120/125: Foundations of Chemistry and Lab; Chem 211 and 212/212L: Organic Chemistry I and II and Lab; Chem 240/240L: Analytical Chemistry with lab; Chem 311 and 312/312L: Physical Chemistry I and II and Lab; Chem 414: Biochemistry; Chem 411: Medicinal and Computational Chemistry with lab; Chem 416: Mechanisms of Drug Action; and Chem 415: Advanced Biochemistry

2. Math 121 and 122: Calculus I and II

3. Phys: 109/110 or 111/112 with labs: Physics I and II and Labs

Economics

The Economics Department, through its emphasis on logical
and quantitative analysis and communication skills, serves
as prepares students interested in careers in business, law, medicine, government, non-profits, and international relations, as well as in academic roles. 

Economics: Faculty and Staff

PROFESSORS

Marshall K. Gramm. 2000. Chair. B.A., Rice University; Ph.D., Texas A & M University. (Applied microeconomics.)
John E. Murray. 2011. Joseph R. Hyde III Professor of Political Economy. B.A., Oberlin College; M.S., University of Cincinnati; M.A., Ph.D., The Ohio State University. (Economic history.)
C. Nicholas McKinney. 2003. Robert D. McCallum Professor of Economics. B.A., B.S., Centenary College of Louisiana; Ph.D., Texas A & M University. (Experimental economics, applied microeconomics.)

ASSOCIATE PROFESSOR

Teresa Beckham Gramm. 1999. B.A., Agnes Scott College; Ph.D., University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. (International economics.)

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS

Bruno D. Badia. 2015. B.A., Federal University of Rio Grande do Sul, Brazil; M.A., Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil; Ph.D., Stony Brook University. (Industrial organization, game theory, applied microeconomics.
Courtney A. Collins. 2013. B.A., Rhodes College; Ph.D., Texas A&M University. (Applied economics.)
Jaqueline Oliveira. 2016. B.A., Federal University of Minas Gerais, Brazil; M.Sc., University of Sao Paulo, Brazil; M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D., Yale University. (Development, labor, family and urban economics.)

VISITING PROFESSOR

Erin Kaplan. 2016. B.A., University of Kansas; Ph.D., University of California at Santa Barbara. (Labor and health economics.)

STAFF

Linda Gibson. 2006. Departmental Assistant. B.A., Vanderbilt University; M.L.S., George Peabody College.

Honors in Economics

  1. Requirements for a major in Economics.
  2. Economics 495-496 (instead of Economics 486).
  3. A substantial research paper in an area of special interest to the candidate.
  4. An oral examination on the research paper.

All honors students must meet eligibility criteria established for the Honors Program.

Requirements for a Major in Economics

A total of forty-eight (48) credits as follows:

  1. Economics 100, 201, 202, 290, 420, 486.
  2. Twenty credits from Economics 250, 265, 305, 308, 310, 311, 312, 317, 318, 323, 331, 339, 343, 345, 349, 357, 377, 407, 440, 465; Math 342.
  3. Mathematics 115 or 121. (For graduate study, Math 121 and 122 should be considered.)
  4. Recommended: Mathematics 121, 122. Students planning on attending graduate school should consider the Mathematics and Economics interdisciplinary major.

In addition, interdisciplinary majors are offered in:

  • Economics and Business.
  • Economics and International Studies.
  • Mathematics and Economics.
  • Political Economy (an interdisciplinary program.)

Requirements for a Minor in Economics

A total of twenty (20) credits in Economics as follows:

  1. Economics 100, 201, 202.
  2. Eight credits from Economics 250, 265, 290, 305, 308, 310, 311, 312, 317, 318, 323, 331, 339, 343, 345, 349, 357, 377, 407, 420, 440, 465.

Educational Studies

Program Vision and Goals

The Educational Studies Program at Rhodes College is committed to combining a liberal arts education with opportunities for our students to integrate classroom learning with practice in the complex, vibrant, and diverse urban settings of Memphis, TN. The goal of our program is to build upon this commitment to produce future leaders, teachers, researchers, and education policy makers who have hands-on experience in local public schools and have a firm commitment to social justice and anti-oppressive practices in educational spaces.

Program Mission

In collaboration with colleagues on campus and community partners and in keeping with Rhodes’ continuing commitment to academic excellence, the Educational Studies Program strives to:

provide opportunities for students to engage in the study of education as an interdisciplinary field of inquiry and advocacy;

prepare educators, advocates, and thought leaders to provide service and leadership in culturally diverse, economically challenged educational systems and communities;

provide students with unique opportunities at a leading liberal arts college situated in the heart of a resource-rich urban setting.

 

 

Background Checks

Tennessee Code Annotated (TCA 49-5-5610) requires all students entering state approved educator preparation programs to submit the result of a criminal back check to the institution. In compliance with this requirement, Shelby County Schools (SCS) requires criminal background checks for Rhodes College students who are placed in their schools for clinical experiences and internships with P – 12 students. The results will be sent to a Rhodes College representative. For more information, contact the Director for Teacher Licensure and Fields Placements, Dr. Kathy Evans (evansk@rhodes.edu).

Educational Studies: Faculty and Staff

Professors

Natalie K. Person. 1994. Chair. B.A., University of Mississippi; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Memphis. (Cognitive psychology: learning technologies; educational psychology.)

Assistant Professors

Zachary Casey. 2014. B.A.E. and M.A., Arizona State University; Ph.D., University of Minnesota. (Curriculum and Instruction, Multicultural Education, Critical Pedagogy, Teacher Education.)
Laura Taylor. 2017. B.S. Cornell University; M.Ed. University of Saint Thomas; Ph.D. University of Texas at Austin. (Elementary Education, Urban Language and Literacies.)

Program Committee

Charles McKinney, Associate Professor of History
Marcus Pohlmann, Professor of Political Science
Elizabeth Thomas, Associate Professor of Psychology, Director of Urban Studies

Additional Affiliated Faculty

Courtney Collins, Assistant Professor of Economics 
Rebecca Finlayson, Associate Professor of English 
Dana Horgen, Assistant Professor of Chemistry
Felix Kronenberg, Associate Professor of German
Geoff Maddox, Assistant Professor of Psychology 
Pat Shade, Associate Professor of Philosophy 
Marsha Walton, Professor of Psychology 
​Jeanne Wilson, Long-term Adjunct Faculty

Staff

Kathy D. Evans. 2016. Director of Teacher Licensure and Field Placements. B.A., Wheaton College (Norton, MA); M.S., Peabody College; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. (Early childhood education, Child development, Curriculum, Developmental Psychology)

Licensure to Teach

Students can earn elementary (grades K - 5) or secondary licensure (grades 6 -12) within the Teaching and Learning track of the Educational Studies major. The licensure program prepares students to teach in either elementary schools or middle and/or high schools in one of twelve endorsement areas: American Government, English, History, Mathematics, Biology, Chemistry, Spanish, French, German, Latin, Russia, and Chinese. The course of study for secondary licensure students is designed with guidance from faculty members in the discipline in which the student is being certified as well as with faculty in the Educational Studies Program. All secondary licensure candidates are required to double major in Educational Studies and their endorsement discipline. Elementary licensure does not require a double major. Students who are interested in teacher licensure should contact our Director of Teacher Licensure and Field Placements in the early stages of the academic planning process. Applications to the Rhodes College Teacher Licensure Program can be found on the program's website.

 

Licensure to teach is a function of state governments. Institutions and agencies that offer licensure are approved by their respective state departments and boards of education. Tennessee licensure is transferable to all 50 states; some states may require additional exams or content. A guide to certification reciprocity is available through Certification Map. https://certificationmap.com/states/reciprocity-disclaimer/ Students wishing to teach in other states are advised to review the licensure requirements on the appropriate state's department of education website.

 

 

 

Requirements for a Major in Educational Studies

A total of fifty-one (51) credits for students not seeking licensure;  a total of fifty-two (52) credits for elementary licensure students; a total of forty seven (47) credits for secondary licensure students (NOTE: All licensure students will student teach in a post-baccalaureate ninth semester in which they will register for 12 credits):

  1. Core Requirements (7 courses)
     
    1. Foundations (both required)
      1. Foundations of Education ED 201 (F8)
      2. Educational Psychology PSY 222
    2. Human Behavior (one of the following)
      1. Infant and Child Development PSY 229 (F11)
      2. Adolescence PSY 230
      3. Learning & Motivation PSYC 326
    3. Quantitative Skills (one of the following)
      1. Psychological Statistics PSY 211 (F6)
      2. Econ Stat ECON 290 (F6)
      3. Probability Stat MATH 111 (F6)
    4. Philosophy, Ethics, Policy, & History (one of the following)
      1. Philosophy of Education PHIL 270 (F11)
      2. Ethics PHIL 301 (F1)
      3. Urban Education Policy POLSCI 240
      4. Some sections of ED 265
    5. Educational Equity and Disparities (one of the following)
      1. Urban Education ED 220
      2. African American Experience in U.S. Schools ED 225 (F9, F11)
      3. Race, Class, Gender, & Sexuality ED 320 (F9)
      4. Some sections of ED 265
    6. Education Senior Seminar 485
  2. Community-integrative Education ED 360/460 (three or four semesters) (3 or 4 credits total)
    1. All students in Educational Studies are required to complete at least 1 credit of EDUC 360: Field Experience.  Each track has additional requirements, detailed below.
    2. Teaching and Learning: Elementary students must complete 4 credits of EDUC 360 in Shelby County Schools; each of these field experiences (1 credit each) will have a different subject matter focus. Secondary students must complete 3 credits of EDUC 360 in Shelby County Schools. These three semesters will include (in any order) a semester each in a high school, middle school, and special education/special needs setting (any grades 6-12).
    3. Community and Social Change: Students must complete 1 section of EDUC 360, Field Experience in Shelby County Schools (any grades K-12).  Students must complete 2 additional credits, of either EDUC 360 or EDUC 460.
    4. Policy and Reform: Students must complete 1 section of EDUC 360, Field Experience in Shelby County Schools (any grades K-12).  Students must complete 2 additional credits, of either EDUC 360 or EDUC 460.
    5. Students will have their first field placement in their first semester after declaring. The ED 460 course instructor will work with majors to ensure that the school/community placement complements each student’s course of study.
    6. Students must adhere to all Shelby County School rules and protocols in their placements.​
    7. EDUC 460 is an Educational Studies Internship, which can be taken for 1-4 credits.  Please contact Educational Studies Faculty and Staff for additional information about possible internships.
  3. Three tracks (five courses/20 credits for students not seeking licensure;five courses/20 credits for students elementary licensure students; four courses/16 credits for secondary licensure students). All majors will choose one of three following tracks (1) Teaching and Learning; (2) Community and Social Change, (3) Policy and Reform.
     
    1. Teaching and Learning - (licensure optional) - supports students interested in entering the teaching profession as teachers or administrators and those interested in seeking licensure. Licensure within this track is optional. Students who wish to teach at the secondary level must also major in the discipline in which they plan to teach. All licensure candidates will register for 12 credits and student teach in a ninth semester.

      Required courses for those seeking elementary licensure (five courses, 20 credits)

      1. Principles of Curriculum and Instruction ED 355
      2. Educational Technologies ED 300
      3. Literacy & Reading in the Content Areas EDUC 310
      4. Elementary Literacies EDUC 370
      5. One additional course from electives

      Required courses for those seeking secondary licensure (four courses, 16 credits)

      1. Principles of Curriculum and Instruction ED 355
      2. How to Write: Academic Writing and the Pedagogies that Support It ENG 290 (F2i and F11)
      3. Educational Technologies ED 300
      4. Literacy & Reading in the Content Areas EDUC 310
       
  4. Community and Social Change - ­supports students who are interested in educational practices outside traditional educational settings.  Prepares students who are interested in adult literacy and basic education, youth development, educational work in non-profits, museum education, artists-in-residence, community education, environmental educational, etc.

 

  1. Policy and Reform - provides opportunities for interdisciplinary explorations of pressing social and educational issues on local, national, and international levels. Prepares students who are interested in issues of equity and diversity, civic education, feminist and critical education, and the media.

    Elective courses for all three tracks (at least two 300-400 level courses)
    1. Gender and Society ANSO 231
    2. Gender Politics and Protests ANSO 233
      The Sociology of MLK in Practice: A Place-Based Study of King and the St. Augustine Civil Rights Movement ANSO 235 (F9, F11)
    3. Urban Social Problems ANSO 241
    4. Social Movements ANSO 243
    5. The Sociology of Community-Integrative Education ANSO 245 (F11, F2i)
    6. Gender and Environment ANSO 273
    7. Race and Ethnicity in American Society ANSO 331
    8. Intro to Social Research ANSO 351
    9. Black Feminist Thought ANSOC 365
    10. Hip-Hop & the Post-Soul South ANSOC 365
    11. Anthropology of Social Change ANSO 379
    12. Prejudice and the Human Condition ANSO 391
    13. Sociology of Violence and Peace Making ANSO 392
    14. Economics of Education ECON 265
    15. Topics in Education EDUC 265
    16. Directed Research in Education EDUC 451
    17. Study in African American Literature ENGL 264
    18. African American Literature ENGL 364
    19. Junior Seminar Critical Theory ENGL 385
    20. Introductory Seminars in History (when topics are relevant) HIST 105 (F2i, F3)
    21. Selected Topics in History (when topics are relevant) HIST 205 (F3)
    22. The United States in the Twentieth Century HIST 233 (F3)
    23. African American History HIST 242 (F3, F9)
    24. Civil Rights Movement HIST 243 (F3)
    25. History of Memphis HIST 248 (F3)
    26. Gender in the United States HIST 249
    27. Slavery in the United States HIST 342
    28. Civil Rights in Memphis HIST 345
    29. African American Activism HIST 447
    30. Government and Politics of Africa IS 251 (F9)
    31. International Human Rights IS 336
    32. Philosophy of Race PHIL 255
    33. Philosophy of Education PHIL 270 (F11)
    34. Introduction to Public Policy POLSC 205
    35. Urban Politics and Policy POLSC 206
    36. Race and Ethnic Politics POLSC 207
    37. Modern Ideologies POLSC 214
    38. Justice, Equality, and Liberty POLSC 218
    39. Black Political Thought POLSC 230
    40. Poverty and Public Policy POLSC 318
    41. Race, Housing and Urban Revitalization POLSC 319
    42. Healthcare Policy 320 POLSC 320
    43. Community Psychology PSY 250
    44. Gender and Sexualities PSY 280
    45. Social Issues in Ethical & Religious Perspective RS 232 (F1)
    46. Theologies of Liberation RS 259
    47. Health Equity Internship RS 460
    48. #DOBLACKLIVESMATTER? THEA 265
    49. Intro to Urban Studies URBN 201 (F8, F11)
    50. Research Methods in Urban Studies URBN 220 (F8, F11)
    51. Urban Geography URBN 230 (F2i, F8)
    52. Introduction to Urban and Community Health URBN 240 (F8)
    53. Intercultural Knowledge & Competence URBN 250 (F9)
    54. Urban Field Research URBN 362

      Additional electives for Teaching & Learning track only:
       
    55. Environmental Issues in Southern Africa BIOL 212
    56. Collaborative Chemistry Communities CHEM 260 (2 credits)
    57. Language Acquisition and Pedagogy GRS/MLL 240
    58. Principles of Curriculum and Instruction EDUC 355
    59. How to Write: Academic Writing and the Pedagogies that Support it ENGL 290 (F2i and F11, 4 credits)
    60. Advanced Grammar ENGL 380
    61. Advanced Language and Civilization SPAN 301
    62. Spanish American Literature and Culture SPAN 306
    63. Children’s Literature: Page to Stage THEA 254

      Additional elective courses in Community and Social Change track:
       
    64. Management of Organizations BUSCOM 361
    65. Global Politics IS 220 (F8)
    66. Comparative Ecopolitics IS 341 (F8)
    67. U.S. Politics POLSC 151 (F8, F2i some sections)
    68. Non-profits in the City URBN 340
    69. Urban Studies Internship (Crosstown Arts Section) URBN 460

      Additional electives for Policy & Reform track:
       
    70. Management of Organizations BUSCOM 361
    71. Global Politics IS 220 (F8)
    72. Comparative Ecopolitics IS 341 (F8)
    73. U.S. Politics POLSC 151 (F8, F2i some sections)
    74. Philosophy of Law PHIL 216
    75. Politics of Migration IS 340

 

Requirements for a Minor in Educational Studies

The Minor in Educational Studies requires 24 credits:

1. Education 201 & 355.

2. Psychology 222.

3. Twelve credits selected from the following courses: Education 220, 225, 265, 300, 310, 320, 370; Education 360, 451, 460 (2 or 4 credits); Economics 295 (2 credits); Language Acquisition and Pedagogy GRS/MLL 240; Philosophy 255, 270; Political Science 240; Psychology 229, 230, 250, 326; Urban Studies 250.

English

From the classics to the contemporary, the Department of English offers Rhodes students a wide array of courses in literature, creative writing and film. Students develop the ability to analyze and create with an emphasis on establishing strong writing skills. 

English: Faculty and Staff

Professors

Gordon Bigelow. 1998. The T. K. Young Chair of Literature. A.B., Brown University; M.A., University of New Hampshire; Ph.D., University of California, Santa Cruz. (Nineteenth-century Britain and Ireland, Cultural Studies.) 
Marshall Boswell. 1996. B.A., Washington and Lee University; M.A., Washington University; Ph.D., Emory University. (American Literature.)
Scott Newstok. 2007. B.A., Grinnell College; Ph.D., Harvard University. (Shakespeare, Poetics.)
Brian W. Shaffer. 1990. Associate Dean of Academic Affairs for Faculty Development. B.A., Washington University; Ph.D., University of Iowa. (Twentieth-century British and Irish literature, modern novel.)

Associate Professors

Rebecca Finlayson. 2001. Director of College Writing, Director of the Rhodes Summer Writing Institute. B.A., Smith College; M.A. and Ph.D., Emory University. (Early Modern British Literature.)
Lori Garner. 2009. B.A., Hendrix College; M.A. University of Arkansas; Ph.D., University of Missouri. (Medieval Studies, Oral Tradition.)
Judith Haas. 2002. B.A., Wesleyan University; Ph.D., University of California, Santa Cruz. (Medieval Studies, Women’s Studies.)
Leslie Petty. 2003. The Charles R. Glover Chair of English Studies. B.A., Emory University; M.A., Louisiana State University; Ph.D., University of Georgia. (American Literature.)
Rashna Wadia Richards. 2008. B.A., Narsee Monjee College, Mumbai, India; M.A., University of Mumbai, India; M.A., West Virginia University; Ph.D., University of Florida. (Film Studies.)
Seth Rudy. 2010. B.F.A., New York University (Film and Television); M.A., New York University; Ph.D., New York University. (Eighteenth Century English Literature, British Romanticism.)

Assistant Professors

Amy Benson. 2016. B.S., Bowling Green State University; M.F.A., University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa, AL (Creative Non-Fiction.)
Chanelle Benz. 2017. B.F.A., Boston University; M.F.A., Syracuse University. (Creative Writing, Fiction.)
Stephanie Elsky. 2017. B.A., Columbia University; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Pennsylvania. (Early Modern Literature.)
Ernest Gibson, III. 2012. B.A., Fisk University; M.A., Purdue University; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Massachusetts-Amherst. (Afro-American Studies.)
Jason Richards. 2008. B.A., and M.A., California State University, Long Beach; Ph.D., University of Florida. (American Literature, Postcolonial Literature.)
Caki Wilkinson. 2012. B.A., Rhodes College; M.F.A. (Poetry) Johns Hopkins University; Ph.D., University of Cincinnati. (English and Comparative Literature.)

Staff

Lorie W. Yearwood. 2006. Departmental Assistant. A.A.S., State Technical Institute at Memphis.

Honors in English

  1. Courses required: fulfillment of the requirements for a major in English; English 495-496.
  2. A substantial, in-depth thesis.
  3. Approval by the English Honors Committee.

Requirements for a Major in English

A total of 11 courses (forty-four credits) as follows:

Track I: Concentration in Literature:

  1. English 285, normally taken by the end of the sophomore year.
  2. English 385, normally taken in spring of the junior year (students abroad may take this course in senior year).
  3. English 485, normally taken in the senior year.
  4. Eight (8) additional courses in English, 190 or above, at least 6 of which must be in literature.
  5. Of the eleven required courses, a minimum of seven (7) must be numbered 300 or above. (English 460 does not fulfill this requirement.)
  6. Of the eleven required courses, a minimum of three (3) must be in literature written before 1800 (i.e., 219, 230, 260, 315-345, 359, 485 where topic is appropriate) with at least two (2) numbered 300 or above.

Track II: Concentration in Literature and Creative Writing:

  1. English 285, normally taken by the end of the sophomore year.
  2. English 385, normally taken in spring of the junior year. (Students abroad may take this course in the senior year.)
  3. One of the following sequences of major genre workshops (three courses):
    1. English 200, 300, 400 (Poetry Workshops)
    2. English 201, 301, 401 (Fiction Workshops)
  4. One additional course chosen from English 200, 201, 203, 204, 205, 300, 301, 400, 401
  5. English 485, normally taken in the senior year.
  6. One course in literature written before 1800 numbered 300 or above (English 315, 319, 320, 322, 323, 325, 332, 335, 336, 340, 345, 359, 485 where topic is appropriate).
  7. Two (2) additional literature courses numbered 300 or above. (English 460 does not fulfill this requirement.)
  8. One additional course in literature, 190 or above. (One film course or internship may be counted in this category.)

Note: Those considering the concentration in writing should contact one of the creative writing professors for early advising, preferably by the end of the first year.

Requirements for a Minor in English

A total of 5 courses (20 credits) as follows:

  1. Two courses at the 190 or 200 level
  2. Three additional courses in English numbered 300 or higher.

The Writing Center

The Department oversees a writing service available to all Rhodes students. Student tutors are available daily to assist students with written work. 

Greek and Roman Studies

The Greek and Roman Studies program helps students develop a thorough understanding of the ancient Greek, Roman, and associated cultures as the basis for the artistic, scientific, social, and political traditions of Western society.  

In addition to this disciplinary function, the department fulfills other roles in the college's curriculum:

The F10 Degree Requirement. The degree requirement in languages may be met by the successful completion of any appropriate four-credit course numbered 201 or higher or by demonstrating proficiency through placement into a language course at a level above 201 and approval by the appropriate language faculty. Students who take 201 (or higher) or the equivalent at another institution can earn transfer credit, but must still demonstrate proficiency in the specific language before the degree requirement is satisfied. This policy pertains to languages that are taught at Rhodes. Students for whom English is a second language may have this requirement waived.

Rhodes offers a secondary licensure program within the Teaching and Learning track of the Educational Studies major. This program prepares students to teach middle and/or high school in one of eleven endorsement areas, including Latin. The course of study for secondary licensure students is designed with guidance from faculty members in the discipline in which the student is being certified as well as members of the Educational Studies Program. All secondary licensure candidates are required to double major in Educational Studies and their endorsement discipline.

Greek and Roman Studies: Faculty and Staff

Professors

Geoffrey W. Bakewell. 2011. B.A., Yale University; Ph.D., Brown University. (tragedy, Athenian democracy, Greek and Latin languages and literatures.)

Associate Professors

Kenneth S. Morrell. 1993. B.A., Stanford University; M.A. and Ph.D., Harvard University. (Greek and Latin languages and literatures, information technology.)
Susan Satterfield. 2008. B.A., University of Alabama; Ph.D., Princeton University. (Roman history, religion, and historiography, Greek and Latin languages and literatures.)
David H. Sick. 1997. Chair. B.A., College of Wooster; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Minnesota. (Greek and Roman religion, Indo-European mythology, Roman social history, Greek and Latin languages and literatures.)

Assistant Professors

Joseph N. Jansen. 2007. B.A., University of Wisconsin; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin. (ancient history, economy, and historiography, Greek and Latin languages and literatures.)
Ariel López.  2014.  B.A., University of Buenos Aires; Ph.D. Princeton University. (late antique history, monasticism, Coptic language and literature.)
R. Scott Garner. 2016. B.A. University of Missouri--Columbia; Ph.D., Princeton University. (oral tradition, Greek epic and poetry, Greek and Latin languages and literatures.)

Honors in Greek and Roman Studies

Detailed information about graduating with honors in Greek and Roman Studies is available from the department. Only students with a minimum overall GPA of 3.5 and a GPA within GRS of 3.7 by the end of the fall semester of their junior year will be eligible to pursue honors. In addition to fulfilling the requirements for the major with a concentration in either Greek, Latin, Classical Studies, or material culture, students seeking honors will be expected to complete the following additional work:

  1. GRS 495-496: Honors Tutorial. (GRS 496 will count as GRS 475-6 for students attempting to graduate with honors.)
  2. An honors thesis or project that demonstrates an exceptional understanding of one or more aspects of the ancient world. Such a project might take the form, for example, of a written thesis, an analysis of archaeological fieldwork, or the production of a tragedy or comedy.

Programs Abroad

To help students experience the artifacts of the Greeks and Romans and other Mediterranean cultures in the areas where they lived, GRS offers a number of opportunities for travel-study abroad. As described below in the descriptions for GRS 305 and Latin 232, the department regularly offers courses that involve travel and study in Greece, Italy, and other countries in the Mediterranean and Middle East. Faculty members also contribute to collaborative initiatives that provide opportunities for research, and the department secures places for students in archaeological excavations and surveys, such as those at the harbor at Kenchreai, Greece. European Studies features course work at Sewanee, Rhodes and Oxford in conjunction with visits to sites in Great Britain, Italy, Greece, and Turkey. (More information about European Studies is available in the catalog in the section on “Opportunities for Study Abroad and Off-Campus Study.”) Finally, the college is a member of the American School of Classical Studies in Athens and the Intercollegiate Center for Classical Studies in Rome, which operate centers for study and research in Greece and Italy respectively.

 

Requirements for a Major in Greek and Roman Studies

Concentration in Classical Languages (Greek and/or Latin):

A total of thirteen courses (46 credits) as follows:

  1. Six courses (24 credits) of ancient Greek and/or Latin. Four of these courses must be above the 201 level, and the student must take at least two courses in each language.
  2. Greek and Roman Studies 275, 474, 475, and 476.
  3. Three courses (12 credits) on the culture and civilization of ancient Greece and Rome. The courses below count toward this requirement:
    • Art 209, 218, 219, 220, 253, 365 (when appropriate)
    • European Studies: Art 836, Greek and Roman Studies 833, 834, History 830, Philosophy 835
    • Greek and Roman Studies: 150, 245, 250, 255, 260, 265, 270, 283, 305, 310, 315, 361
    • History 211, 221, 222, 311, 312, 313
    • Humanities (Search) 101, 102, 201 (Classical Track)
    • Philosophy 201
    • Political Science 311
    • Religious Studies 214, 280, 281, 282, 283, 285, 286
    • Theatre 280

Concentration in Classical Studies:

A total of thirteen courses (46 credits) as follows:

  1. Three courses (12 credits) of ancient Greek and/or Latin beyond 201. These may be in one language solely or a combination of the two.
  2. Greek and Roman Studies 275, 474, 475, and 476.
  3. Six courses (24 credits) on the culture and civilization of ancient Greece and Rome. The courses below count toward this requirement:
    • Art 209, 218, 219, 220, 253, 365 (when appropriate)
    • European Studies: Art 836, Greek and Roman Studies 833, 834, History 830, Philosophy 835
    • Greek and Roman Studies: 150, 245, 250, 255, 260, 265, 270, 283, 305, 310, 315, 361
    • History 211, 221, 222, 311, 312, 313
    • Humanities (Search) 101, 102, 201 (Classical Track)
    • Philosophy 201
    • Political Science 311
    • Religious Studies 214, 280, 281, 282, 283, 285, 286
    • Theatre 280

Concentration in Material Culture:

A total of thirteen courses (46 credits) as follows:

  1. One course (4 credits) of ancient Greek or Latin beyond 201.
  2. Greek and Roman Studies 275, 474, 475, and 476.
  3. Archaeology 220 or Anthropology 254: Archaeological Methods.
  4. Three courses (12 credits) from the following courses:
    • Art: 209, 218, 219, 220, 253, 365 (when appropriate)
  5. Four courses (16 credits) from the following courses:
    • Anthropology 290/Archaeology 210
    • Chemistry 107
    • European Studies: Art 836, Greek and Roman Studies 833, 834, History 830
    • Greek and Roman Studies 150, 245, 250, 255, 260, 265, 270, 283, 305, 315, 361
    • Humanities (Search) 101, 102, 201 (Classical Track)
    • History 211, 221, 222, 311, 312, 313
    • Religious Studies 260

Requirements for a Minor in Greek and Roman Studies

Concentration in Classical Languages (Greek and/or Latin)

A total of seven courses (28 credits) as follows:

  1. Four courses (16 credits) of ancient Greek and/or Latin. Three of these courses must be above the 201 level, and the student must take at least one course in each language.
  2. Greek and Roman Studies 275.
  3. Two courses (8 credits) on the culture and civilization of ancient Greece and Rome. The courses below count toward this requirement:
    • Art 209, 218, 219, 220, 253, 365 (when appropriate)
    • European Studies: Art 836, Greek and Roman Studies 833, 834, History 830, Philosophy 835
    • Greek and Roman Studies: 150, 245, 250, 255, 260, 265, 270, 283, 305, 315, 361
    • History 211, 221, 222, 311, 312, 313
    • Humanities (Search) 101, 102, 201 (Classical Track)
    • Philosophy 201
    • Political Science 311
    • Religious Studies 214, 280, 281, 282, 283, 285, 286
    • Theatre 280

Concentration in Classical Studies

A total of seven courses (28 credits) as follows:

  1. Two courses (8 credits) of ancient Greek and/or Latin beyond 201. These may be in one language solely or a combination of the two.
  2. Greek and Roman Studies 275.
  3. Four courses (16 credits) of courses on the culture and civilization of ancient Greece and Rome. The courses below count toward this requirement:
    • Art 209, 218, 219, 220, 253, 365 (when appropriate)
    • European Studies: Art 836, Greek and Roman Studies 833, 834, History 830, Philosophy 835
    • Greek and Roman Studies: 150, 245, 250, 255, 260, 265, 270, 283, 305, 315, 361
    • History 211, 221, 222, 311, 312, 313
    • Humanities (Search) 101, 102, 201 (Classical Track)
    • Philosophy 201
    • Political Science 311
    • Religious Studies 214, 280, 281, 282, 283, 285, 286
    • Theatre 280

Concentration in Material Culture

A total of seven courses (28 credits) as follows:

  1. One course (4 credits) of ancient Greek or Latin beyond 201.
  2. Greek and Roman Studies 275
  3. Archaeology 220 or Anthropology 254: Archaeological Methods.
  4. Two courses (8 credits) from the following courses:
    • Art 209, 210, 218, 219, 220, 253, 365 (when appropriate)
  5. Two courses (8 credits) from the following courses:
    • Anthropology 290/Archaeology 210
    • Chemistry 107
    • European Studies: Art 836, Greek and Roman Studies 833, 834, History 830
    • Greek and Roman Studies 150, 245, 250, 255, 260, 265, 270, 283, 305, 315, 361
    • Humanities (Search) 101, 102, 201 (Classical Track)
    • History 211, 221, 222, 311, 312, 313
    • Religious Studies 260

History

 

The Department of History at Rhodes has a national reputation for preparing students to think critically about the historical forces that have shaped the world’s civilizations and cultures, to see the links between the past and the present, to become clear and effective writers and speakers, and to apply their knowledge as thoughtful citizens of the world.  A wide range of course offerings, internships, fellowships, and research opportunities empower students to prepare for success in any career path which they choose and to find their place within the ongoing human story.

Designed for students who want to pursue the professional work of historians, we also offer a concentration in Public History -- one of a very few undergraduate program of its kind in the nation.  Students fully engage in the work of historic preservation, museum studies, or library and archive studies.  Unique courses and experiences prepare students for professions or graduate training in the field through hands-on internships with our community partners.  In these internships, students work behind-the-scenes of some of Memphis’ premiere public history institutions helping to research, create, and maintain displays; working to restore, digitize, and publish one-of-a-kind archival material; giving tours; and promoting the work of their internship institution within the city.  Students work closely with professionals in the field to develop the skills of a public historian.  And they talk with members of the public about history, bringing the past to life for Memphians and the millions of tourists who come to the Bluff City.  

Decades’ worth of data gathered by the Rhodes College Alumni Office shows how Rhodes History alumni have succeeded in an amazingly wide range of occupations from filmmaking and urban planning to museums and teaching at the university level.  Our graduates work as members of the clergy, account executives, business managers, musicians, journalists, members of the US military, counselors, business analysts, marketers, librarians and archivists, coaches, IT specialists, pilots, social workers, brokers, Peace Corps veterans, real estate developers, non-profit executives, artists, flight attendants, restauranteurs, land use planners -- and that’s just the beginning. 

 

History Course Numbering

History 100-level courses. Designed for first-year students and sophomores, these seminars focus on specific topics. These courses are writing intensive and fulfill one of the "written communication" requirements (F2i) under the Foundations Curriculum. These courses also fulfill the "historical forces" (F3) requirement.

History 200-level courses. These courses cover a broad chronological span or large geographical area and are introductory in nature. In addition to mastering course content, students will begin to learn to think historically through interpretive writing assignments that require them to draw from and engage with course material and readings. Such courses are open to all students and normally fulfill the "historical forces" Foundation (F3) requirement. Several of these courses also fulfill other Foundations, including "meaning and value" (F1), "institution and society" (F8), and "cultural perspectives" (F9).

History 300-level courses. These courses focus on specific topics or time periods, while paying significant attention to historiography. Students are required to make a significant oral presentation. Sophomore standing is required for these courses, unless otherwise noted. Several of these courses also fulfill Foundation requirements, including "meaning and value" (F1), "literary texts" (F4), and "cultural perspectives" (F9).

History 400-level courses. These courses focus on specific topics or time periods, while paying significant attention to historiography. Students are required to complete a substantive research paper in which they engage substantially with primary sources. Sophomore standing is required for these courses.

History: Faculty and Staff

Professors

Michael R. Drompp. 1989. Professor. B.A., M.A., and Ph.D., Indiana University. (East Asian history, China and Japan, Inner Asian history) 
Timothy S. Huebner. 1995.. The Irma O. Sternberg Professor of History. B.A., University of Miami; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Florida. (U.S. South, nineteenth century, U.S. constitutional/legal history)
Jonathan Judaken. 2011. The Spence Wilson Chair in the Humanities. B.A. University of California, San Diego; M.A. and Ph.D. University of California, Irvine (Modern Europe, cultural and intellectual history) 
Lynn B. Zastoupil. 1988. B.A., Dickinson State College; M.A., University of Texas; Ph.D., University of Minnesota. (Modern Britain, India, European intellectual history)

Associate Professors

Jeffrey H. Jackson. 2000. Chair. The J. J. McComb Chair in History B.S., Vanderbilt University; Ph.D., University of Rochester. (Modern Europe, France, cultural history, natural disasters)
Michael J. LaRosa. 1995. B.A., George Washington University; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Miami. (Contemporary Latin America, Colombia, church history)
Seok-Won Lee. 2011. B.A., and M.A., Yonsei University; Ph.D. Cornell University. (Modern East Asia)
Charles W. McKinney. 2004. B.A., Morehouse College; M.A. and Ph.D., Duke University. (African-American history, civil rights studies, twentieth-century United States)
Robert F. Saxe. 2003. B.A., Reed College; Ph.D., University of Illinois. (Twentieth-century United States, political history, war and society)
Etty Terem. 2008. B.A. and M.A., Tel Aviv University; Ph.D., Harvard University. (Modern Middle East and North Africa, Islamic law and society)
Tait S. Keller. 2008. B.A., University of Rochester; M.A. and Ph.D., Georgetown University. (Environmental history, modern Europe, Germany)

Assistant Professors

Hannah Barker. 2014. B.A. University of Chicago; M.A., M.Phil., and Ph.D., Columbia University. (Medieval Europe and Mediterranean)
Ariel Eisenberg.  2017.  Assistant Professor.  B.A., Barnard College; M.A., University of Wisconsin-Madison; Ph.D., University of Wisconsin-Madison. (History of women, gender, and sexuality; LGBTQ history; disability history; urban history) 
 

Staff

Carol E. Kelley. Departmental Assistant. 2016. B.A., Christian Brothers University. 
 

Honors in History

  1. Completion of all requirements for a Bachelor of Arts degree in History, as well as a minimum overall grade point average of 3.50 and a minimum history grade point average of 3.50.
  2. Completion of History 495-496.
  3. Completion of a major research project, culminating in a research paper and an oral presentation. The student normally begins preparing a proposal by taking a directed inquiry in the spring of the junior year.The formal research proposal must be accepted by the Department early in the student’s senior year. The project must be completed and approved by the supervising committee by April.

Requirements for a Major in History

Requirements for a major in History

A total of 11 courses (44 credits) as follows:

  1. History 300 (The Historian’s Craft)
  2. History 485 (Senior Seminar)
  3. Nine (9) additional courses at the 100, 200, 300, and 400 levels, selected according to the following principles:
    1. Of the nine courses, no more than one section of History 105 may be taken.
    2. Of the nine courses, at least two must be seminar courses at the 300 level.
    3. Of the nine courses, at least two must be seminar courses at the 400 level.
    4. Of the nine courses taken at all levels, at least one must be taken in five of the six areas listed below:
      1. History of Asia
      2. History of Europe
      3. Global/Comparative History
      4. History of Latin America
      5. History of North Africa/Middle East
      6. History of the United States  
    5. Of the nine courses taken at all levels, at least one must concentrate in the period prior to 1500 CE. The following courses meet that requirement: History 211, 212, 213, 222, 282, 293, 311, 312, 313, 315, 375, 413, and 415. (There may be special topics as well.)
    6. Humanities 201 (History Track) counts as a 200-level history course, although it does not fulfill one of the area requirements listed above.

Credit earned through AP or IB does not fulfill the requirements of the major or minor but does count toward the 128 credits required for graduation.

Requirements for a major in History with a concentration in Public History

A total of 11-14 courses (44-56 credits) as follows:

  1. History 300 (The Historian’s Craft)
  2. History 485 (Senior Seminar)
  3. Nine (9) additional courses at the 100, 200, 300, and 400 levels, selected according to the following principles:
    1. Of the nine courses, no more than one section of History 105 may be taken.
    2. Of the nine courses, at least two must be seminar courses at the 300 level.
    3. Of the nine courses, at least two must be seminar courses at the 400 level.
    4. Of the nine courses taken at all levels, at least one must be taken in five of the six areas listed below:
      1. History of Asia
      2. History of Europe
      3. Global/Comparative History
      4. History of Latin America
      5. History of North Africa/Middle East
      6. History of the United States  
    5. Of the nine courses taken at all levels, at least one must concentrate in the period prior to 1500 CE. The following courses meet that requirement: History 211, 212, 213, 222, 282, 293, 311, 312, 313, 315, 375, 413, and 415. (There may be special topics as well.)
    6. Humanities 201 (History Track) counts as a 200-level history course, although it does not fulfill one of the area requirements listed above.
    7. History 360. Public History/Internship
    8. At least one of the following courses:
      1. History 260. Topics in Public History and Memory
      2. History 463. Public History Practicum
      3. History 490. Directed Research (topic relating to public history)
      4. Interdepartmental 225. Geographic Information Systems (GIS)
    9. At least one of the following experiences:
      1. Archaeology 120 or 450. Archaeological Field School
      2. History 461. Internship (at a public history site)
      3. Archival Studies Fellowship (F11)
      4. Shelby Foote Fellowship

Credit earned through AP or IB does not fulfill the requirements of the major or minor but does count toward the 128 credits required for graduation.

Requirements for a Minor in History

A total of 5 courses (20 credits) selected according to the following principles:

  1. No more than one section of History 105 may be taken.
  2. At least two courses at the 300 or 400 level.
  3. At least one course in each of three of the following areas:
    1. History of Asia
    2. History of Europe
    3. Global/Comparative History
    4. History of Latin America
    5. History of North Africa/Middle East
    6. History of the United States
  4. Humanities 201 (History Track) counts as a 200-level history course, although it does not fulfill the area requirements listed above.

Credit earned through AP or IB does not fulfill the requirements of the major or minor but does count toward the 128 credits required for graduation.

Interdisciplinary Study

Africana Studies

The Mission of the Africana Studies Program is to understand and appreciate the integral yet distinct experiences of people of African heritage throughout the world. The Program’s curriculum aims to emphasize diasporic connections to Africa, the Caribbean and North America in an effort to enrich our understanding and appreciation of our complex and diverse world. As such, the Program encourages students to seek appropriate ways to integrate content and analysis in this broad subject matter with their work in other disciplines and programs. 

Africana Studies: Program Committee

Charles McKinney, Department of History, Chair

Ernest Gibson, Department of English

Charles Hughes, Director, Memphis Center

Evelyn Perry, Department of Anthropology and Sociology

Zandria Robinson, Department of Anthropology and Sociology

Requirements for a Minor in Africana Studies

A total of twenty-four (24) credits as follows:

  1. Africana Studies 105 (Introduction to Africana Studies)
  2. Africana Studies 305 (Africana Theory)
  3. Either History 242 (African American History) or English 224 (African American Literature)
  4. International Studies 251 (Government and Politics of Africa)
  5. Two (2) approved Africana Studies Electives

Archaeology

Archaeology at Rhodes involves ground-level, empirical techniques such as survey and excavation to recover material remains, as well as the application of scientific and statistical methods to the study of material culture.

Archaeology: Program Committee

Miriam Clinton, Department of Art and Art History
Dee Garceau, Department of History
Kimberly Kasper, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
Susan Kus, Department of Anthropology and Sociology, Chair of the Archaeology Program
Jeanne Lopiparo, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
Milton Moreland, Department of Religious Studies
Kenny Morrell, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
Jon Russ, Department of Chemistry
Susan Satterfield, Department of Greek and Roman Studies

 

Requirements for a Minor in Archaeology

A total of twenty-four (24) credits as follows:

  1. Archaeology 210 or Anthropology 290: Learning from Things: Material Culture Studies.
  2. Archaeology 220 or Anthropology 254: Archaeological Methods or Art 220 Classical Archaeology
  3. Three courses that deal with archaeological issues offered in various departments. At least two departments must be represented to satisfy this requirement. A list of current courses is available each semester. The following courses are representative offerings that satisfy this requirement.
    • Anthropology/Sociology 202: Understanding the Past: Archaeological Perspectives on Culture
    • Anthropology/Sociology 207: Archaeology of Sex and Gender
    • Anthropology/Sociology 221: North of the Rio Grande: Indigenous People of North America
    • Anthropology/Sociology 224: Latin America before 1492
    • Anthropology/Sociology 265: Selected Introductory Topics in Anthropology and Sociology (when subject matter pertains to Archaeology)
    • Anthropology/Sociology 271: Ecological Anthropology
    • Anthropology/Sociology 275: Food and Culture
    • Anthropology/Sociology 325: The Maya and Their World
    • Anthropology/Sociology 327: Gender and Power in Latin America
    • Art 209: Art and Architecture of the Ancient Near East
    • Art 218: Greek Art and Architecture
    • Art 219: Roman Art and Architecture
    • Art 265: Topics in Art (when subject matter pertains to Archaeology)
      Art 353: Art and Life in Pompeii
    • Chemistry 107: Chemistry and Archaeology
    • Greek and Roman Studies 361: GIS and Mediterranean Archaeology
    • Religious Studies 260: Archaeology and the Biblical World
    • Religious Studies 276-277: Selected Topics in Hebrew/Bible/Old Testament (when subject matter pertains to Archaeology)
    • Religious Studies 285-286: Selected Topics in New Testament (when subject matter pertains to Archaeology)
  4. A choice of one course from the following three options.
    • Archaeology 120: Field Research in Environmental Archaeology
    • Archaeology 450: Archaeological Field School
    • Archaeology 460: Internship

Asian Studies

The political, economic, and cultural importance of the nations of Asia grows every year and the Asian Studies Program promotes the understanding of Asia’s historical, cultural, political, and economic role in the world. 

Asian Studies: Program Committee

Chien-Kai Chen, Department of International Studies
Michael R. Drompp, Department of History
Li Han, Department of Modern Languages and Literature
John C. Kaltner, Department of Religious Studies
Seok-Won Lee, Department of History
David Mason, Department of Theatre, Chair
Mark W. Muesse, Department of Religious Studies
John E. Murray, Department of Economics
Chia-rong Wu, Department of Modern Languages and Literature
Lynn B. Zastoupil, Department of History

Requirements for a Minor in Asian Studies

A total of twenty (20) credits as follows:

  1. One "Primary" Asian Studies course.
  2. One "Secondary" Asian Studies course offered by a department other than that which provided the course that fulfilled the "Primary" requirement.
  3. Three additional, 200+ level, approved Asian Studies courses.

"Primary" Asian Studies Courses
History 105: Revolutions and Revolutionaries in Modern East Asia
History 105: World War II in Asia
History 105: The Mongol World Empire
History 105: The Two Koreas, Past and Present

Art 165: Survey of Asian Art

Chinese 206: Introduction to East Asian Cultures
Chinese 214: Introduction to Chinese Culture
Chinese 216: Asian Urbanization Through Cinema*

History 282: Traditional China
History 283: Modern China
History 287: Traditional Japan
History 293: Ancient and Medieval India

International Studies 261: Government and Politics of China
International Studies 263: Comparative Political Economy of East Asia

Religious Studies 255: Religions of Asia
Religious Studies 258/Philosophy 250: Asian Philosophies


"Secondary" Asian Studies Courses
Chinese 205: Modern Chinese Literature in Translation
Chinese 215: Gender in Chinese Literature
Chinese 220: Contemporary Chinese Cinema

History 205: The Vietnam Wars
History 282: Traditional China
History 283: Modern China
History 287: Traditional Japan
History 288: Japan Since 1800
History 293: Ancient and Medieval India
History 294: Modern India

International Studies 262: China’s Foreign Policy
International Studies 263: Comparative Political Economy of East Asia
International Studies 264: China-Taiwan-US Relations

Religious Studies 255: Religious Traditions of India
Religious Studies 255: Religions of Asia
Religious Studies 258: Buddhism, Up to Now
Religious Studies 258/PHIL 250: Asian Philosophies
Religious Studies 258: Spirituality West and East


Additional Asian Studies Courses
History 385: Nomads of Inner Asia
History 391: Gandhi
History 481: Cold War in East Asia

Theatre 360: Theatre In India

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (BMB) is an interdisciplinary major that allows students to study life at the molecular level under the guidance of faculty drawn from the departments of Biology, Chemistry, and Mathematics & Computer Science.

Biochemistry and Molecular Biology: Program Committee

Terry Hill, Department of Biology
Loretta Jackson-Hayes, Department of Chemistry
Mary Miller, Department of Biology, Chair
Larryn Peterson, Department of Chemistry

Honors in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology

  1. Courses required: those listed for the B. S. degree in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology as well as the Honors Tutorial (BMB 495 and BMB 496).
  2. Permission of the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Program Committee.
  3. An original investigation of some problem in the area of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. This project is usually related to work being carried out by members of the faculty affiliated with the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Major. The project may also be carried out off campus, with the careful guidance of a BMB faculty member liaison for the project.
  4. A credible thesis must be presented at the end of the project. The honors project and thesis must be approved by the student’s honors committee, which should be comprised of at least three members of the faculty, two affiliated with the Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Major, and one from outside of the program.

Requirements for a Major in Biochemistry and Molecular Biology Leading to the B.S. Degree

Courses required for the BMB major that are appropriate for the fall semester of the first year include Chemistry 120-120L and Biology 130-131L. Students considering taking both Chemistry 120-120L and Biology 130-131L in the fall semester of the first year should consult a BMB advisor.

A total of fifty-eight to sixty-four (58-64) credits as follows:

  1. Chemistry 120-125L (Foundations in Chemistry), 211, 212-212L (Organic Chemistry with laboratory), and 240-240L (Analytical Chemistry with laboratory)
  2. Biology 130-131L (Biology I with laboratory) and Biology 140-141L (Biology II with laboratory)
  3. Biology 325-325L (Molecular Biology with laboratory)
  4. Biology 307 (Cell Biology)
  5. Chemistry 414 (Biochemistry)
  6. BMB 310 (Methods in Biochemistry and Cell Biology)
  7. BMB 485 or 486 (Senior Seminar)
  8. Any one of the following: Computer Science 141 (Programming Fundamentals) OR Math 121 (Calculus I) OR one course in probability and statistics. Courses that would be appropriate in the area of probability and statistics include Math 111, Math 211, Psychology 211, Economics 290.​
  9. Two of the following courses; at least one must have a laboratory:

             a. Elective Courses with Laboratory

                       Biology 204-204L (Mechanisms of Development with laboratory)

                       Biology 301-301L (Microbiology with laboratory)

                       Biology 304-304L (Genetics with laboratory)

                       Chemistry 406 (Instrumental Analysis)

                       BMB 451 or 452 (Research with affiliated faculty - 4 credits only may satisfy one elective; must be approved by the BMB committee)

             b. Elective Courses without a Laboratory

                        Biology 330 (Virology/Immunology)

                        Biology 376 (Molecular Neuroscience)

                        Biology 380 (Topics in Biomedical Science)

                        Chemistry 311 (Physical Chemistry)

                        Chemistry 416 (Mechanisms of Drug Action)

 

 

For students seeking admission to graduate school, the following courses are recommended:

  • BMB 451 or 452
  • Chemistry 312-312L for programs in biochemistry.
  • Mathematics 121, 122
  • Physics 111-111L, 112-112L

For students seeking admission to programs in the health professions, please visit the Health Professions Website: http://www.rhodes.edu/academics/3981.asp.

Of the following courses no more than one may be transferred into Rhodes from another institution to satisfy the requirements for the BMB major: Cell Biology, Biochemistry, Molecular Biology, and Methods in Biochemistry and Cell Biology.

No more than one of the two courses listed in item #9  above may be transferred into Rhodes from another institution to satisfy the requirements for the BMB major.

Students seeking a double major must have at least four courses listed in items #3 through #9 for the BMB major that are not used to satisfy requirements for the other major.

Environmental Studies and Sciences

The Environmental Studies & Sciences Program at Rhodes offers an innovative curriculum that allows students to combine study in social sciences, humanities, natural sciences, and fine arts.

 

Environmental Studies and Sciences: Program Committee

Erin Bodine, Department of Mathematics and Computer Science
Sarah Boyle, Department of Biology, Chair
Michael Collins, Department of Biology
Tara Massad, Department of Biology
Kimberly Kasper, Department of Anthropology/Sociology
Tait Keller, Department of History
William Eckenhoff, Department of Chemistry
Jennifer Dabbs Sciubba, Department of International Studies
Rebecca Tuvel, Department of Philosophy

Policy on Advanced Placement Credit

Students who have received a 5 on the Advanced Placement Environmental Science examination may count that credit as one introductory Environmental Sciences elective course in the Environmental Studies and Sciences majors and minors.

Requirements for a Major in Environmental Sciences

A total of fifty four to fifty six (54-56) hours and one additional environmental experience as follows:

  1. Four Introductory Courses:
    1. ENVS 150: Environment and Society.
    2. Three introductory courses from the following list:
      1. BIOL 120: Environmental Science.
      2. CHEM 120: Foundations of Chemistry. (environmentally-themed section preferred)
      3. ENVS 111: Physical Geology.
      4. ENVS 116: Introductory Topics in Earth Science.
      5. ENVS 120: Introduction to Earth and Atmospheric Science.
      6. ENVS 170: Rocky Mountain Field Research. (at Teton Science Schools)
      7. MATH 214: Discrete Mathematical Modeling with Biological Applications.
  2. One statistics course from the following list:
    1. ECON 290: Statistical Analysis for Economics and Business.
    2. MATH 111: Introduction to Applied Statistics.
    3. MATH 211: Statistical Methods and Their Applications
    4. PSYC 211: Statistical Methods.
  3. Four upper-level Environmental Sciences electives. Three courses must contain a lab component. Courses must come from at least two departments. Additional courses may be designated by the Environmental Studies and Sciences program.
    1. Prerequisites: ENVS 111 or BIOL 120 or CHEM 120
      1. ENVS 211(L): Geomorphology.
    2. Prerequisites: BIOL 120 or ENVS 120 and CHEM 120
      1. ENVS 206(L): Topics in Environmental Sciences. (when approved by the director of the program)
      2. ENVS 220(L): Physical Geography of the Southern United States.
    3. Prerequisites: BIOL 120 and CHEM 120 or BIOL 130-131 and 140-141
      1. BIOL 212: Environmental Issues in Southern Africa.
      2. BIOL 315(L): Ecology.
      3. BIOL 320(L): Conservation Biology.
      4. BIOL 345(L): Ornithology.
      5. BIOL 365: Advanced Topics in Biology. (i.e. Plants and People, or other environmentally-related topic approved by the director of the program)
    4. Prerequisites: BIOL 120, CHEM 120, and Math or Statistics
      1.       ENVS 260: Aquatic Ecosystem Analysis. (Semester in Environmental Science Program)
      2.       ENVS 270: Terrestrial Ecosystem Analysis. (Semester in Environmental Science Program)
    5. Prerequisites: BIOL 130-131 and 140-141
      1. BIOL 200(L): Evolution.
      2. BIOL 201(L): Mycology.
      3. BIOL 202: Vertebrate Life.
      4. BIOL 207(L): Animal Behavior.
      5. BIOL 253(L): Plant Genetics and Diversity.
      6. BIOL 301(L): Microbiology.
      7. BIOL 365(L): Advanced Topics in Biology. (i.e. Vertebrate Biology, or other environmentally-related topic approved by the director of the program)
    6. Prerequisite: Chemistry 120
      1. CHEM 206: Environmental Chemistry.
      2. CHEM 211: Organic Chemistry I.
    7. Prerequisite: Chemistry 211
      1. CHEM 240(L): Analytical Chemistry.
    8. Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor
      1. ENVS 451-452: Research.
      2. ENVS 495-496: Honors Tutorial.
  4. Two Environmental Studies electives from the following list:
    1. ANSO 201: Human Evolution.
    2. ANSO 221: North of the Rio: Indiginous People of North America.
    3. ANSO 265: Selected Introductory Topics in Anthropology and Sociology. (i.e. Southern Foodscapes, or other environmentally-related topic approved by the director of the program)
    4. ANSO 271: Ecological Anthropology.
    5. ANSO 273: Gender and the Environment.
    6. ANSO 275: Food and Culture: You Are What You Eat.
    7. ART 166: Topics in Studio Art: Sculpture, Trees, and the Life of Wood.
    8. ART 265: Urban Design.
      CHIN 216: Asian Urbanization through Cinema.
    9. ECON 100: Introduction to Economics
    10. ECON 349: Environmental and Natural Resource Economics.
    11. ECON 360: Urban Economics.
    12. ENGL 332: Advanced Shakespeare Studies: Green Shakespeare.
    13. ENGL 336: Literature & Landscape.
    14. ENVS 205: Topics in Environmental Studies. (when approved by the director of the program)
    15. FYWS 151: Overton: Memphis and the History of Urban Parks.
    16. HIST 105: Disease & Epidemics.
    17. HIST 105: Human Reproduction
    18. HIST 105: City/Technology/Environment
    19. HIST 207: Global Environmental History.
    20. HIST 307: Nature and War.
    21. HIST 309: Natural Disasters.
    22. HUM 201: Search for Values. (Jackson’s or Bakewell's section only)
    23. INTS 220: Global Ecopolitics.
    24. INTS 221: Population and National Security.
    25. INTS 340: The Politics of Migration.
    26. INTS 341: Comparative Ecopolitics.
    27. PHIL 230: Environmental Philosophy.
    28. POLS 206: Urban Politics and Policy.
    29. RELS 220: Topics in Theology: Environmental Theology.
    30. URBN 201: Introduction to Urban Studies.
    31. URBN 235: Principles of Public Health
  5. INTD 225: Geographic Information Systems.
  6. ENVS 486: Senior Seminar.
  7. Experiential Learning. Each student in the major will be required to complete an environmentally-oriented experience in which he or she will have a substantial engagement with environmental issues outside the Rhodes campus. There are several ways to complete this requirement, some of which are credit-bearing, but others are not. As with the College’s F11 requirement, students are not required to receive academic credit. The experiential learning component may be fulfilled by a course that counts as one of the electives for the major.
    1. Students may enroll in one of the following:
      1. ARCE 120: Field Research in Environmental Archaeology.
      2. ARCE 450: Archaeological Field School.
      3. BIOL 214: Environmental Field Study in Namibia.
      4. ENVS 160: Rocky Mountain Ecology (at Teton Science Schools).
      5. ENVS 170: Rocky Mountain Field Research (at Teton Science Schools).
        ENVS 405: Independent Research Project. (Semester in Environmental Science Program)
      6. ENVS 451-452: Research.
      7. ENVS 460: Internship in Environmental Studies and Sciences.
      8. ENVS 495-496: Honors Tutorial.
    2. Experiences other than those listed above must be approved by the director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences Program and will require a substantial essay, evaluated by the director of the program, which links the student’s experience with what he or she has learned in the classroom. Experiences may include organized service projects at Rhodes with faculty or staff oversight (such as the Summer Service Fellowships), or study abroad experiences approved by Rhodes with significant environmental content as determined by the director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences program.

Requirements for a Major in Environmental Studies

A total of fifty-two (52) credits and one additional environmental experience as follows:

  1. Four Introductory Courses:
    1. ENVS 150: Environment and Society.
    2. Two introductory Environmental Studies courses from the following list (these two courses may not also be used to fulfill Environmental Studies electives):
      1. ANSO 201: Human Evolution.
      2. HIST 207: Global Environmental History.
      3. INTS 220: Global Ecopolitics.
      4. PHIL 230: Environmental Philosophy.
    3. One introductory Environmental Sciences course from the following list (this course may not also be used to fulfill Environmental Sciences elective):
      1. BIOL 120: Introduction to Environmental Science.
      2. ENVS 111: Physical Geology.
      3. ENVS 116: Introductory Topics in Earth Science.
      4. ENVS 120: Introduction to Earth and Atmospheric Science.
      5. ENVS 170: Rocky Mountain Ecology Field Research. (at Teton Science Schools)
  2. ECON 100: Introduction to Economics.
  3. Four Environmental Studies electives from the following list; courses must come from at least two departments; additional courses may be designated by the Environmental Studies and Sciences program:
    1. ANSO 201: Human Evolution.
    2. ANSO 221: North of the Rio: Indigenous People of North America.
    3. ANSO 265: Selected Introductory Topics in Anthropology and Sociology. (i.e. Southern Foodscapes, or other environmentally-related topic approved by the director of the program)
    4. ANSO 271: Ecological Anthropology.
    5. ANSO 273: Gender and the Environment.
    6. ANSO 275: Food and Culture: You Are What You Eat.
    7. ART 166: Topics in Studio Art: Sculpture, Trees, and the Life of Wood.
    8. ART 265: Urban Design.
    9. CHIN 214: Intro to Chinese Culture: Material Culture and Chinese Gardens.
    10. ECON 349: Environmental and Natural Resource Economics.
    11. ECON 360: Urban Economics.
    12. ENGL 332: Advanced Shakespeare Studies: Green Shakespeare.
    13. ENGL 336: Literature & Landscape.
    14. ENVS 205: Topics in Environmental Studies. (when approved by the director of the program)
    15. ENVS 451-452: Research.
    16. ENVS 495-496: Honors Tutorial.
    17. FYWS 151: Overton: Memphis and the History of Urban Parks.
    18. HIST 105: Disease & Epidemics.
    19. HIST 105: Human Reproduction.
    20. HIST 105: City/Technology/Environment
    21. HIST 207: Global Environmental History.
    22. HIST 307: Nature and War.
    23. HIST 309: Natural Disasters.
    24. HUM 201: Search for Values. (Jackson’s or Bakewell's section only)
    25. INTS 220: Global Ecopolitics.
    26. INTS 221: Population and National Security.
    27. INTS 340: The Politics of Migration.
    28. INTS 341: Comparative Ecopolitics.
    29. PHIL 230: Environmental Philosophy.
    30. POLS 206: Urban Politics and Policy.
    31. RELS 220: Topics in Theology: Environmental Theology.
    32. URBN 201: Introduction to Urban Studies.
    33. URBN 235: Principles of Public Health
  4. Two additional Environmental Sciences courses from the following list; additional courses may be designated by the Environmental Studies and Sciences program:
    1. No Prerequisites
      1. BIOL 120: Introduction to Environmental Science.
      2. CHEM 120(L): Foundations of Chemistry. (Environmentally-themed section preferred)
      3. ENVS 111: Physical Geology.
      4. ENVS 116: Introductory Topics in Earth Science.
      5. ENVS 120: Introduction to Earth and Atmospheric Science.
      6. ENVS 170: Rocky Mountain Ecology Field Research. (at Teton Science Schools)
      7. MATH 115: Applied Calculus or a statistics course (ECON 290 or MATH 111 or MATH 211 or PSYC 211) or COMP 141: Computer Science I.
      8. MATH 214: Discrete Mathematical Modeling with Biological Applications.
    2. Prerequisites: ENVS 111 or BIOL 120 or CHEM 120
      1. ENVS 211(L): Geomorphology.
    3. Prerequisites: BIOL 120 or ENVS 120 and CHEM 120
      1. ENVS 206(L): Topics in Environmental Sciences. (when approved by the director of the program)
      2. ENVS 220(L): Physical Geography of the Southeastern United States.
    4. Prerequisites: BIOL 120 and CHEM 120 or BIOL 130-131 and 140-141
      1. BIOL 212 : Environmental Issues in Southern Africa.
      2. BIOL 315(L): Ecology.
      3. BIOL 320(L): Conservation Biology.
      4. BIOL 345(L): Ornithology.
      5. BIOL 365: Advanced Topics in Biology. (i.e. Plants and People, or other environmentally-related topic approved by the director of the program)
    5. Prerequisites: BIOL 130-131 and 140-141
      1. BIOL 200(L): Evolution.
      2. BIOL 201(L): Mycology.
      3. BIOL 202: Vertebrate Life.
      4. BIOL 207(L): Animal Behavior.
      5. BIOL 253(L): Plant Genetics and Diversity.
      6. BIOL 301(L): Microbiology.
      7. BIOL 365(L): Advanced Topics in Biology. (i.e. Vertebrate Biology, or other environmentally-related topic approved by the director of the program)
    6. Prerequisite: Chemistry 120
      1. CHEM 206: Environmental Chemistry.
      2. CHEM 211: Organic Chemistry I.
    7. Prerequisite: Chemistry 211
      1. CHEM 240(L): Analytical Chemistry.
  5. INTD 225: Geographic Information Systems.
  6. ENVS 486: Senior Seminar.
  7. Experiential Learning. Each student in the major will be required to complete an environmentally-oriented experience in which he or she will have a substantial engagement with environmental issues outside the Rhodes campus. There are several ways to complete this requirement, some of which are credit-bearing, but others are not. As with the College’s F11 requirement, students are not required to receive academic credit. The experiential learning component may be fulfilled by a course that counts as one of the electives for the major.
    1. Students may enroll in one of the following:
      • ARCE 120: Field Research in Environmental Archaeology.
      • ARCE 450: Archaeological Field School.
      • BIOL 214: Environmental Field Study in Namibia.
      • ENVS 160: Rocky Mountain Ecology. (at Teton Science Schools)
      • ENVS 170: Rocky Mountain Ecology Field Research. (at Teton Science Schools)
      • ENVS 451-452: Research.
      • ENVS 460: Internship in Environmental Studies and Sciences.
      • ENVS 495-496: Honor's Tutorial.
    2. Experiences other than those listed above must be approved by the director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences Program and will require a substantial essay, evaluated by the director of the program, which links the student’s experience with what he or she has learned in the classroom. Experiences may include organized service projects at Rhodes with faculty or staff oversight (such as the Summer Service Fellowships), or study abroad experiences approved by Rhodes with significant environmental content as determined by the director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences program. Students should submit the form on the program’s website to petition for such experiences.

Requirements for a Minor in Environmental Sciences

A total of twenty-four to twenty-seven (24-27) credits and one environmental experience as follows:

  1. ENVS 150: Environment and Society.
  2. One of the following introductory courses in Environmental Sciences:
    1. BIOL 120: Environmental Science.
    2. CHEM 120(L): Foundations of Chemistry.
    3. ENVS 111: Physical Geology.
    4. ENVS 116: Introductory Topics in Earth Science.
    5. ENVS 120: Introduction to Earth and Atmospheric Science.
    6. MATH 115: Applied Calculus.
    7. MATH 214: Discrete Mathematical Modeling with Biological Applications.
  3. Three of the following Environmental Sciences courses from the following list. At least one must be taken from outside student’s major department. Additional courses may be designated by the Environmental Studies and Sciences program.
    1. No Prerequisites
      1. BIOL 120: Introduction to Environmental Science.
      2. CHEM 120(L): Foundations of Chemistry. (Environmentally-themed section preferred)
      3. ENVS 111: Physical Geology.
      4. ENVS 116: Introductory Topics in Earth Science.
      5. ENVS 120: Introduction to Earth and Atmospheric Science.
      6. ENVS 170: Rocky Mountain Ecology Field Research. (at Teton Science Schools)
      7. INTD 225: Geographic Information Systems
      8. MATH 115: Applied Calculus.
      9. MATH 214: Discrete Mathematical Modeling with Biological Applications.
    2. Prerequisites: ENVS 111 or BIOL 120 or CHEM 120
      1. ENVS 211(L): Geomorphology
    3. Prerequisites: BIOL 120 or ENVS 120 and CHEM 120
      1. ENVS 206(L): Topics in Environmental Sciences. (when approved by the director of the program)
      2. ENVS 220(L): Physical Geography of the Southeastern United States.
    4. Prerequisites: BIOL 120 and CHEM 120 or BIOL 130-131 and 140-141
      1. BIOL 212: Environmental Issues in Southern Africa.
      2. BIOL 315(L): Ecology.
      3. BIOL 320(L): Conservation Biology.
      4. BIOL 345(L): Ornithology.
      5. BIOL 365: Advanced Topics in Biology. (i.e. Plants and People, or other environmentally-related topic approved by the director of the program)
    5. Prerequisites: BIOL 130-131 and 140-141
      1. BIOL 200(L): Evolution.
      2. BIOL 201(L): Mycology.
      3. BIOL 202: Vertebrate Life.
      4. BIOL 207(L): Animal Behavior.
      5. BIOL 253(L): Plant Genetics and Diversity.
      6. BIOL 301(L): Microbiology.Prerequisite: Chemistry 120
      7. BIOL 365(L): Advanced Topics in Biology. (i.e. Vertebrate Biology, or other environmentally-related topic approved by the director of the program)
    6. Prerequisites: BIOL 120, CHEM 120, and Math or Statistics

            ENVS 260: Aquatic Ecosystem Analysis. (Semester in Environmental Science Program)
            ENVS 270: Terrestrial Ecosystem Analysis. (Semester in Environmental Science Program)

      Prerequisite: Chemistry 120
      1. CHEM 206: Environmental Chemistry.
      2. CHEM 211: Organic Chemistry I.
    7. Prerequisite: Chemistry 211
      1. CHEM 240(L): Analytical Chemistry.
  4. One additional Environmental Studies elective from the following list. Additional courses may be designated by the Environmental Studies and Sciences program.
    1. ANSO 201: Human Evolution.
    2. ANSO 221: North of the Rio: Indigenous People of North America.
    3. ANSO 265: Selected Introductory Topics in Anthropology and Sociology. (i.e. Southern Foodscapes, or other environmentally- related topic approved by the director of the program)
    4. ANSO 271: Ecological Anthropology.
    5. ANSO 273: Gender and the Environment.
    6. ANSO 275: Food and Culture: You Are What You Eat.
    7. ART 166: Topics in Studio Art: Sculpture, Trees, and the Life of Wood.
    8. ART 265: Urban Design.
    9. CHIN 214: Intro to Chinese Culture: Material Culture and Chinese Gardens.
    10. ECON 100: Intro to Economics
    11. ECON 349: Environmental and Natural Resource Economics.
    12. ECON 360: Urban Economics.
    13. ENGL 332: Advanced Shakespeare Studies: Green Shakespeare.
    14. ENGL 336: Literature & Landscape.
    15. ENVS 205: Topics in Environmental Studies. (when approved by the director of the program)
    16. FYWS 151: Overton: Memphis and the History of Urban Parks.
    17. HIST 105: Disease & Epidemics.
    18. HIST 105: Human Reproduction.
    19. HIST 105: City/Technology/Environment.
    20. HIST 207: Global Environmental History.
    21. HIST 307: Nature and War.
    22. HIST 309: Natural Disasters.
    23. HUM 201: Search for Values. (Jackson’s or Bakewell's section only)
    24. INTS 220: Global Ecopolitics.
    25. INTS 221: Population and National Security.
    26. INTS 340: The Politics of Migration.
    27. INTS 341: Comparative Ecopolitics.
    28. PHIL 230: Environmental Philosophy.
    29. POLS 206: Urban Politics and Policy.
    30. RELS 220: Topics in Theology: Environmental Theology.
    31. URBN 201: Introduction to Urban Studies.
    32. URBN 235: Principles of Public Health.
  5. Experiential Learning. Each student in the minor will be required to complete an environmentally-oriented experience in which he or she will have a substantial engagement with environmental issues outside the Rhodes campus. There are several ways to complete this requirement, some of which are credit-bearing, but others are not. As with the College’s F11 requirement, students are not required to receive academic credit. The experiential learning component may be fulfilled by a course that counts as one of the electives for the major.
    1. Students may enroll in one of the following:
      1. ARCE 120: Field Research in Environmental Archaeology.
      2. BIOL 214: Environmental Field Study in Namibia.
      3. ARCE 450: Archaeological Field School.
      4. ENVS 160: Rocky Mountain Ecology. (at Teton Science Schools)
      5. ENVS 170: Rocky Mountain Field Research. (at Teton Science Schools)
      6. ENVS 451-452: Research.
      7. ENVS 460: Internship in Environmental Studies and Sciences.
    2. Experiences other than those listed above must be approved by the director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences Program and will require a substantial essay, evaluated by the director of the program, which links the student’s experience with what he or she has learned in the classroom. Experiences may include organized service projects at Rhodes with faculty or staff oversight (such as the Summer Service Fellowships), or study abroad experiences approved by Rhodes with significant environmental content as determined by the director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences program.

N.B.: Although not required, COMP 141: Computer Science I, is strongly recommended.

Requirements for a Minor in Environmental Studies

A total of twenty-four to twenty-five (24-25) credits and one additional experiential environmental experience as follows:

  1. ENVS 150: Environment and Society.
  2. One introductory course from the following:
    1. ANSO 201: Human Evolution.
    2. HIST 207: Global Environmental History.
    3. INTS 220: Global Ecopolitics.
    4. PHIL 230: Environmental Philosophy.
  3. Three of the following Environmental Studies courses from at least two departments. Additional courses may be designated by the Environmental Studies and Sciences program.
    1. ANSO 201: Human Evolution.
    2. ANSO 221: North of the Rio: Indigenous People of North America.
    3. ANSO 265: Selected Introductory Topics in Anthropology and Sociology. (i.e. Southern Foodscapes, or other environmentally-related topic approved by the director of the program)
    4. ANSO 271: Ecological Anthropology.
    5. ANSO 273: Gender and the Environment.
    6. ANSO 275: Food and Culture: You Are What You Eat.
    7. ART 166: Topics in Studio Art: Sculpture, Trees, and the Life of Wood.
    8. ART 265: Urban Design.
    9. CHIN 214: Intro to Chinese Culture: Material Culture and Chinese Gardens.
    10. ECON 100: Intro to Economics
    11. ECON 349: Environmental and Natural Resource Economics.
    12. ECON 360: Urban Economics.
    13. ENGL 332: Advanced Shakespeare Studies: Green Shakespeare.
    14. ENGL 336: Literature & Landscape.
    15. ENVS 205: Topics in Environmental Studies. (when approved by the director of the program)
    16. FYWS 151: Overton: Memphis and the History of Urban Parks.
    17. HIST 105: Disease & Epidemics.
    18. HIST 105: Human Reproduction.
    19. HIST 105: Technology/Cities/Environment
    20. HIST 207: Global Environmental History.
    21. HIST 307: Nature and War.
    22. HIST 309: Natural Disasters.
    23. HUM 201: Search for Values. (Jackson’s or Bakewell's section only)
    24. INTS 220: Global Ecopolitics.
    25. INTS 221: Population and National Security.
    26. INTS 340: The Politics of Migration.
    27. INTS 341: Comparative Ecopolitics.
    28. PHIL 230: Environmental Philosophy.
    29. POLS 206: Urban Politics and Policy.
    30. RELS 220: Topics in Theology: Environmental Theology.
    31. URBN 201: Introduction to Urban Studies.
    32. URBN 235: Principles of Public Health.
  4. One Environmental Sciences course from the following list. Additional courses may be designated by the Environmental Studies and Sciences program.
    1. No Prerequisites
      1. BIOL 120: Introduction to Environmental Science.
      2. CHEM 120(L): Foundations of Chemistry. (Environmentally-themed section preferred)
      3. ENVS 111: Physical Geology.
      4. ENVS 116: Introductory Topics in Earth Science.
      5. ENVS 120: Introduction to Earth and Atmospheric Science.
      6. ENVS 170: Rocky Mountain Ecology Field Research. (at Teton Science Schools)
      7. INTD 225: Geographic Information Systems.
      8. MATH 115: Applied Calculus or COMP 141: Computer Science I or a statistics course (ECON 290, MATH 111 or PSYC 211).
      9. MATH 214: Discrete Mathematical Modeling with Biological Applications.
    2. Prerequisites: ENVS 111
      1. ENVS 211(L): Geomorphology
    3. Prerequisites: BIOL 120 or ENVS 120 and CHEM 120
      1. ENVS 206(L): Topics in Environmental Sciences. (when approved by the director of the program)
      2. ENVS 220(L): Physical Geography of the Southeastern United States.
    4. Prerequisites: BIOL 120 and CHEM 120 or BIOL 130-131 and 140-141
      1. BIOL 212: Environmental Issues in Southern Africa.
      2. BIOL 315(L): Ecology.
      3. BIOL 320(L): Conservation Biology.
      4. BIOL 345(L): Ornithology.
      5. BIOL 365: Advanced Topics in Biology. (i.e. Plants and People, or other environmentally-related topic approved by the director of the program)
    5. Prerequisites: BIOL 130-131 and 140-141
      1. BIOL 200(L): Evolution.
      2. BIOL 201(L): Mycology.
      3. BIOL 202: Vertebrate Life.
      4. BIOL 207(L): Animal Behavior.
      5. BIOL 253(L): Plant Genetics and Diversity.
      6. BIOL 301(L): Microbiology.
    6. Prerequisite: Chemistry 120
      1. CHEM 206: Environmental Chemistry.
      2. CHEM 211: Organic Chemistry I.
    7. Prerequisite: Chemistry 211
      1. CHEM 240(L): Analytical Chemistry.
  5. Experiential Learning. Each student in the minor will be required to complete an environmentally-oriented experience in which he or she will have a substantial engagement with environmental issues outside the Rhodes campus. There are several ways to complete this requirement, some of which are credit-bearing, but others are not. As with the College’s F11 requirement, students are not required to receive academic credit. The experiential learning component may be fulfilled by a course that counts as one of the electives for the major.
    1. Students may enroll in one of the following:
      1. ARCE 120: Field Research in Environmental Archaeology.
      2. ARCE 450: Archaeological Field School.
      3. BIOL 214: Environmental Field Study in Namibia.
      4. ENVS 160: Rocky Mountain Ecology. (at Teton Science Schools)
      5. ENVS 170: Rocky Mountain Field Research. (at Teton Science Schools)
      6. ENVS 451-452: Research.
      7. ENVS 460: Internship in Environmental Studies and Sciences.
    2. Experiences other than those listed above must be approved by the director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences Program and will require a substantial essay, evaluated by the director of the program, which links the student’s experience with what he or she has learned in the classroom. Experiences may include organized service projects at Rhodes with faculty or staff oversight (such as the Summer Service Fellowships), or study abroad experiences approved by Rhodes with significant environmental content as determined by the director of the Environmental Studies and Sciences program.

N.B.: Although not required, COMP 141: Computer Science I, is strongly recommended.

Film and Media Studies

Film and Media Studies at Rhodes College offers a critical understanding of the history, theory, and production of moving images. Interdisciplinary by design, Film and Media Studies draws from courses in various departments, including Art, Educational Studies, English, History, International Studies, Modern Languages and Literatures, Political Science, and Theatre.

 

Film and Media Studies: Program Committee

Rashna Richards, Department of English, Chair

Affiliated Faculty

Barron Boyd, Department of International Studies

Zachary Casey, Educational Studies Program

Joy Broke Fairfield, Department of Theatre

Darren Floyd, Department of Art and Art History

Dee Garceau, Department of History

Amy Jasperson, Department of Political Science

Michael LaRosa, Department of History

Han Li, Department of Modeern Languages and Literatures

Laura Loth, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures

David McCarthy, Department of Art

Scott Newstok, Department of English

Seth Rudy, Department of English

Lynn Zastoupil, Department of History

Nikolaos Zahariadis, Department of International Studies

 

Requirements for a Minor in Film and Media Studies

A total of twenty (20) credits as follows:

  1. English 202: Introduction to Cinema
  2. English 382: Film Theory
  3. Three courses to be chosen from a list of offerings in various departments. One of these requirements may be satisfied by a directed inquiry or an internship (on approval of the Film Minor Committee). Courses regularly offered include:
    1. Art 110: Film/Experimental Video Production
    2. Art 114: Digital Art
    3. Art 166: Animation (when topic is appropriate)
    4. Art 213: Digital Art: Intermediate Projects
    5. Art 216: 3D Animation/Virtual Realities
    6. Art 313: Digital Art: Advanced Projects
    7. Chinese 216/Urban Studies 265: Asian Urbanization through Cinema
    8. Chinese 220/320: Contemporary Chinese Cinema
    9. English 190: Shakespeare on Screen (when topic is appropriate)
    10. English 204: Introduction to Screenwriting
    11. English 241: History and Criticism of American Cinema
    12. English 242: World Film
    13. English 245: Special Topics in Film
    14. English 381: Advanced Topics in Film
    15. French 334: French and Francophone Cinema
    16. German 240/340: German Cinema
    17. History 105: British Empire through Film
    18. History 105: History of Latin America through Film
    19. History 462: Historical Documentary Filmmaking
    20. International Studies 254: South Africa through Documentary Film
    21. International Studies 256: Weapons of Mass Deception
    22. Political Science 208: Media and Politics
    23. Political Science 308: Political Advertising
      Russian 285: Putin's Russia and Media
    24. Russian 400: Russian Film
    25. Theatre 265: Dramatic Writing
    26. Theatre 265: LGBTQ Culture in Media

First-Year Writing Seminar

The First-Year Writing Seminars (FYWS) are offered by different departments across the curriculum and fulfill the first component of the F2 Requirement.

Director of College Writing: Rebecca Finlayson, Department of English

151. First-Year Writing Seminar.

Fall, Spring. Credits 4.

Degree Requirement: F2s.

A course that develops the ability to read and think critically, to employ discussion and writing as a means of exploring and refining ideas, and to express those ideas in effective prose. Individual sections of the course will explore different topics in reading, discussion, and writing. Topics are selected by individual professors and are designed to help students develop transferable skills of analysis and argumentation, applicable to the various disciplines of the liberal arts and sciences. Several papers will be required, at least one of which will involve use of the library and proper documentation. The seminar will emphasize successive stages of the writing process, including prewriting, drafting, and revision, and will provide feedback from classmates and the instructor. Students may not take both FYWS 151 and FYWS 155.

155. First-Year Writing Seminar: Daily Themes.

Fall, Spring. Credits 4.

Degree Requirement: F2s.

An alternative to FYWS 151 offered to outstanding first-year writers, by invitation from the Director of College Writing. The course is limited to 12 students who meet as a class once a week and individually with the instructor or in small groups with the Writing Fellow once a week. Students will turn in 4 one-page themes each week. Some research will be required, and students will use their daily themes as the basis for two longer papers: one at mid term and the other at the end of the semester. Students may not take both FYWS 151 and FYWS 155.

Gender and Sexuality Studies

Gender and Sexuality Studies focuses on the ways in which gender and sexuality function as part of a dynamic system that shapes identity, structures knowledge, and determines the distribution of social and political power.

Gender and Sexuality Studies: Affiliated Faculty

Elizabeth Bridges, Department of Modern Languages
Kathleen Doyle, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
Dee Garceau-Hagen, Department of History
Rhiannon Graybill, Department of Religious Studies
Judith Haas, Department of English, Chair
Li Han, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
Amy Jasperson, Department of Political Science
Kimberly Kasper, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
Mona Kreitner, Department of Music
Susan Kus, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
Jeanne Lopiparo, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
Laura Loth, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
Shira Malkin, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
Michelle Mattson, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
David McCarthy, Department of Art
Valeria Z. Nollan, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
Evie Perry, Department of Anthropology and Sociology 
Leslie Petty, Department of English
Rashna Richards, Department of English
Amy Risley, Department of International Studies
Zandria Robinson, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
Vanessa Rogers, Department of Music
Rylan Testa, Department of Psychology
Elizabeth Thomas, Department of Psychology and Urban Studies
Rebecca Tuvel, Department of Philosophy
Marsha Walton, Department of Psychology

 
 
 

Requirements for a Minor in Gender and Sexuality Studies

A total of twenty-four (24) credits as follows:

  1. Gender and Sexuality Studies 200. Introduction to Gender and Sexuality Studies.
  2. Gender and Sexuality Studies 400. Feminist and Queer Theory.
  3. Four courses selected from the Gender and Sexuality Studies curriculum.

Two of these courses must come from fields outside of one’s major. For one of these four courses, students are encouraged to consider an Internship or a Directed Inquiry. In order to receive academic credit for either the Internship or the Directed Inquiry, students must write a proposal, in consultation with a faculty mentor and submit the proposal for approval by the director of Gender and Sexuality Studies.

  • Gender and Sexuality Studies courses regularly offered include, but are not limited to:
  • Anthropology/Sociology 207: Women in Prehistory
  • Anthropology/Sociology 231: Gender and Society
    Anthropology/Sociology 365: Black Feminist Thought
  • English 225: Region, Race, Gender and Class in Southern Literature
  • History 445: Gender in the American West
  • International Studies 432: Women in World Politics
  • Music 105: Women in Music
  • Psychology 232: Psychology of Gender and Sexuality
    Psychology 280: Psychology of Gender and Sexualities
  • Religious Studies 301: Gender and Sexuality in the Hebrew Bible
  • Spanish 350: Short Fiction by Spanish Women Writers
 

Humanities

The Life program and the Search program described below offer alternative ways to fulfill the F1 Requirement in the College’s Foundation requirements.

Life: Then and Now

Staff:
Thomas Bremer, Department of Religious Studies
Patrick Gray, Department of Religious Studies 
Stephen R. Haynes, Department of Religious Studies
Kendra G. Hotz, Department of Religious Studies 
John C. Kaltner, Department of Religious Studies
Steven L. McKenzie, Department of Religious Studies
Bernadette McNary-Zak, Department of Religious Studies
Milton C. Moreland, Department of Religious Studies
Mark W. Muesse, Department of Religious Studies
Mark P. Newman, Department of Philosophy
Susan Satterfield, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
Patrick A. Shade, Department of Philosophy
David Sick, Department of Greek and Roman Studies

In the first two courses of the Life: Then and Now program, the student is introduced to the major methodological approaches to the study of religion represented in the “Life” curriculum. The student selects the last course from a range of courses that apply these specific methodological approaches to different aspects of religion. Fuller course descriptions may be found in the departmental listings.

101-102. Biblical Texts and Contexts: Selected Topics.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4 (per semester).

Degree Requirements: Life Then and Now, F1; F2i (RS 102 only)

This two-course sequence of selected topics enables students to develop critical knowledge of biblical texts and post-biblical traditions by helping them understand how these works and their histories of reception inform interpretive contexts. Students will acquire skills in critical thinking, analysis, reading, and writing that will equip them to recognize the relevance of the academic study of biblical texts and religion. Selected works from the biblical writings and affiliated literature will be discussed within the framework of topics that will allow students to explore their own and others’ operative assumptions about meaning and values.

Religious Studies 101-102 is a prerequisite for 200-level courses in the Religious Studies Department. Humanities 101-102 can substitute for this prerequisite.

 

Final Courses.

The concluding courses in the “Life” curriculum allow the student to focus in particular areas of the study of religion or philosophy. See the departmental listings under “Religious Studies,” “Philosophy,” and “Greek and Roman Studies” for specific courses in the Life curriculum.

The Search for Values in the Light of Western History and Religion

Staff:
Geoffrey Bakewell, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
Hannah Barker, Department of History
Rachel Bauer, Department of Modern Languages
Gordon Bigelow, Department of English
Suzanne Bonefas, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
Elizabeth Bridges, Department of Modern Languages
Daniel E. Cullen, Department of Political Science
Lori Garner, Department of English
Scott Garner, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
Kyle Grady, Department of Philosophy
Patrick Gray, Department of Religious Studies
Rhiannon Graybill, Department of Religious Studies
Judith P. Haas, Department of English
Stephen R. Haynes, Department of Religious Studies
Kendra G. Hotz, Department of Religious Studies
Timothy Huebner, Department of History
Jeffrey H. Jackson, Department of History
Joseph Jansen, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
Ryan Johnson, Department of History
Jonathan Judaken, Department of History
Ariel Lopez, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
Laura Loth, Department of Modern Languages
David Mason, Department of Theatre
Bernadette McNary-Zak, Department of Religious Studies
Milton C. Moreland, Department of Religious Studies
Kenneth S. Morrell, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
John Murray, Department of Economics
Michael Nelson, Department of Political Science
Scott Newstok, Department of English
Valeria Z. Nollan, Department of Modern Languages
Bradley Onishi, Department of Religious Studies
Leigh Pittenger, Department of Religious Studies
Vanessa Rogers, Department of Music
Susan Satterfield, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
Patrick Shade, Department of Philosophy
David H. Sick, Department of Greek and Roman Studies
Rebecca Tuvel, Department of Philosophy
Daniel Ullucci, Department of Religious Studies
Stephen H. Wirls, Department of Political Science

Humanities 101-102-201. The Search for Values in the Light of Western History and Religion.

Fall-Spring-Fall. Credits: 4-4-4.

Degree Requirements: F1.

The Search for Values in the Light of Western History and Religion is an interdisciplinary study of the ideas, beliefs, and cultural developments that have formed Western culture. The first two courses of the sequence are taken in the fall (Humanities 101) and spring (Humanities 102) semesters of the first year. In these courses, students examine original documents in translation from the history and literature of the Israelites, the Greeks, the Romans, and the early Christians. Selected texts from the Hebrew Bible are read and discussed in conjunction with the ideas and themes of Mesopotamian and Greek culture. Students study the Gospels and selected letters from the New Testament in conjunction with Hellenistic and Roman history, life, and thought.

In the third semester of the sequence, students trace the roles of biblical and classical heritages in the shaping of the values, character, and institutions of Western culture and its understanding of self and world.

To this end, they read and discuss selections from the works of philosophers, theologians, political theorists, scientists, and literary artists from the Renaissance to the present. Courses in the second year are organized by discipline or other theme. Choices include biology, classical studies, history, literature, music, philosophy, politics, religious studies, and theatre.

Prerequisites: Humanities 101 is a prerequisite for Humanities 102. Humanities 102 is a prerequisite for Humanities 201. These prerequisites may be satisfied alternatively by the permission of the instructor.

Interdisciplinary Majors

Students interested in interdisciplinary study are encouraged to consider interdisciplinary majors. The following interdisciplinary majors have been approved by the Faculty, and the required courses have been defined as listed below. Students who wish to declare any of these established interdisciplinary majors may do so by filing the normal Declaration of Major form with the Office of the Registrar. Any deviation from the program of study outlined in the description must be approved by the chairpersons of the departments involved.

Biomathematics

  1. Required Mathematics and Computer Science courses (24 credits):
    1. Math 121, 122 (Calculus Sequence) + 251 (Differential Equations)
    2. CS 141 (Computer Science I: Programming Fundamentals)
    3. Math 214 (Discrete Math Modeling with Biological Applications)
    4. Math 315 (Continuous Math Modeling with Biological Applications)
  2. Required Biology courses (14 credits) :
    1. Biology 130, 131L, 140, 141L (Intro Bio Sequence)
    2. One of the following three courses:
      1. Biology 200 + 201L (Evolution)
      2. Biology 304 + 304L (Genetics)
      3. Biology 315 + 315L (Ecology)
  3. Math Electives (8 credits): Select 2 courses from the following list in consultation with the advisor (at least one at the 300 or 400 level):
    1. Math 201 (Transition to Advanced Math)
    2. Math 223 (Multivariable Calculus)
    3. Math 261 (Linear Algebra)
    4. Math 311 (Probability Theory)
    5. Math 312 (Math Statistics)
    6. Math 321 (Real Analysis)
    7. Math 352 (Partial Differential Equations)
    8. Math 465 (Special Topics when appropriate)
    9. CS 142 (Computer Science II: Object-Oriented Programming)
  4. Biology Electives (14 credits): Select 3 courses from the following list in consultation with the advisor (2 must have a lab):
    1. Biology courses at the 200 or 300 level [Biology 307 (Cell Biology) may combine with BCMB 310 (Methods in Cell Biology and Biochemistry) to satisfy a lab elective]
    2. Chemistry 414 (Biochemistry) [may combine with BCMB 310 (Methods in Cell Biology and Biochemistry) to satisfy a lab elective]
    3. Chemistry 416 (Mechanisms of Drug Action)
    4. Neuroscience 270 (Neuroscience) [may combine with Neuroscience 350 (Neuroscience Research Methods) to satisfy a lab elective]
  5. Senior Research (4 credits): 
    Normally, students will have two advisors: one who advises the mathematical component of their senior research and one who advises the biological component of their research. Each student will take three semesters of seminar, one the spring of their junior year (1 credit), and one each semester of their senior year (2 credits fall, 1 credit spring).
    1. Math 386 (Junior Sem), 485-486 (Senior Seminar)
  6. Recommended Courses:
    1. If considering grad school in Ecology it is strongly recommended that students take Bio 315, CS 142, and Math 311.
    2. If considering grad school in Mathematics, Biomathematics, or Mathematical Ecology it is strongly recommended that students take Math 201, 261, and 321.
    3. Students should consider Bio 160, Bio 214, or EnvS 160 as a means of fulfilling their F-11 requirement.
    4. Physics 111 + 111L (Fundamentals in Physics I) as appropriate to career goals
    5. Some classes that may be of interest:
    6. Economics 407 (Game Theory)
    7. Geology 116 (Global Environmental Change)
    8. History 105 (Special Topics: Disease & Epidemics) F2i, F3
    9. History 270 (Global Environmental History) F3, F11
    10. History 374 (Nature & War) F3
    11. History 472 (Environmental Justice) F11
    12. International Studies 340, 341 (Global Ecopolitics, Comparative Ecopolitics) F8
    13. International Studies 375 (Population and National Security) F2i
    14. Philosophy 302 (Environmental Ethics)
    15. Philosophy 303 (Medical Ethics) F1

Economics and Business

A total of sixty-four (64) credits as follows:

  1. Economics 100, 201, 202, 290, 420, 486.
  2. Business 241, 243, 351, 361, 371, 486.
  3. Four credits from Economics 250, 265, 305, 308, 310, 311, 312, 317, 318, 323, 331, 339, 343, 345, 349, 357, 360, 377, 407, 440, 465.
  4. One course from each of two of the following areas:
    1. Accounting: Business 341.
    2. Finance: Business 452, 454.
    3. Management: Business 463, 464, 466, 467, 482
    4. Marketing: Business 472, 473, 474, 482, 483
    5. Business 481.
  5. Mathematics 115, 116, or 121.
  6. Recommended: Mathematics 107; Political Science 218; Interdisciplinary 240.

Economics and International Studies

A total of 15-16 courses (60-64 credits) as follows:

  1. Economics 100, 201, 202, 290, 310, 312; either Economics 486 or International Studies 485.
  2. Economics 407 or 420.
  3. International Studies 110, 120, 300, one two-course sequence, and one additional course at 200-level or above.
  4. Mathematics 115 or 121.
  5. An appropriate foreign language through completion of the second year (202).

History and International Studies

A total of 12-13 courses (48-52 credits) as follows:

  1. History 300, and two additional courses from the following: 207, 209, 215, 216, 217, 224, 225, 226, 232, 233, 255, 256, 261, 262, 267, 275, 276, 281, 283, 288, 294.
  2. International Studies 110, 120, 300.
  3. Economics 100.
  4. A total of four additional courses, two in each department. Students must choose one of the following concentrations:
    1. Europe: History: 314, 320, 321, 327, 395, 415, 427, 428, 429; I.S. 281, 282, 283, 284, 285.
    2. Africa/Middle East: History 375, 395, 475; I.S. 243, 244, 245, 251, 252, 253
    3. Asia: History 391, 395, 481; I.S. 260, 261, 262, 263, 264, 395.
    4. Latin America: History 363, 364, 365; I.S. 273-274.
    5. Global/Comparative: History 307, 365, 389, 395, 406, 413, 427; I.S. 310, 311, 330, 332, 334, 336, 340, 341, 372, 373, 374, 420, 421, 422, 451, 452.
  5. I.S. 485. Senior paper to be written under the direction of one faculty member from each department. The senior paper should pertain to the student’s concentration.
  6. An appropriate foreign language through completion of the second year (202.)

Qualified students wishing to pursue Honors can do so by fulfilling the requirements of the interdisciplinary major and of the Honors Tutorial in either department.

Mathematics and Economics

A total of 15 courses (60 credits) as follows:

  1. Economics 100, 201, 202, 290, 407, 420.
  2. One course from Economics 305, 308, 310, 331, 357.
  3. Mathematics 121, 122, 201, 223, 251, 261.
  4. Mathematics 311 or 321.
  5. Economics 486 or Mathematics 485 and 486. Senior projects must have a faculty reader from both departments. The final presentation of the senior project must be made in the Senior Seminars of both departments.

Qualified students wishing to pursue Honors can do so by fulfilling the requirements of the interdisciplinary major and of the Honors Tutorial in either department.

Mathematics and economics majors seeking admission to graduate programs in economics, operations research, statistics, or mathematical finance are advised to also take Mathematics 312, Mathematics 431, Computer Science 141, Computer Science 142, and possibly Business 351.

Music and Psychology

A total of 16 courses (64 credits) as follows:

  1. Music Courses (6 courses, 8 performance credits = two 4-credit courses):
         a. Theory & Musicianship: MUSC 204 - Understanding Musicianship [F5]
              *Two 300-level music theory courses
              *If placement test determines this course is redundant, choose three 300-level music theory courses.

         b. History & Literature: 1 course from:
              MUSC 227 - European Musical Heritage I [F3]
              MUSC 228 - European Musical Heritage II [F3]

         c. Performance:
              4 semester of large ensembles (MUSC 180-184, 190-194= 1 credit each.)
              4 semesters of applied lessons (MUSC 160-178 = 1 credit each.)
              4 semesters of Performance Attendance (MUSC 100 = 0 credits.)

         d. Electives: Two 4-credit courses

                1. One music cognition/therapy topic course (MUSC 140-149 or MUSC 340-349.)
                2. Other courses should be selected from the following recommended list:

                     MUSC 103 – Elements of Music.
                     MUSC 117-119; 105 [F9] – World Music courses.
                     MUSC 227-228 [F3] – European Musical Heritage courses
                     MUSC 222 – Music Technology. (cognition concentration)
                     MUSC 306 – Mathematical Musical Analysis [F6]
                     MUSC 414-415 – Conducting I & II. (applied concentration)

  NOTE: Music Talent Award and Fine Arts Award recipients' conditions for waivers of Applied Music fees are outlined in their award letters, which supersedes music major and minor fee waivers are contained here.

 

   2. Psychology Courses (7 courses):
          a. Foundational Psychology Courses:
                     PSYC 150 - Foundational Issues in Psychology [F8]
                     PSYC 200 - Research Methods and Statistics
                     PSYC 211 - Statistical Methods [F6] 
          b. Perception - PSYC 216
          c. Advanced Research Methods: 1 course from PSYC 350-353.
          d. Two other courses chosen from one concentration:

                Cognition:

  1.                PSYC 306 – Language and Communication
  2.                PSYC 327 – Cognitive Processes
  3.                PSYC 345 – Cognitive Neuroscience
  4.                PSYC 451-452 – Research Practicum (4 credits)
  5.                NEURO 270 – Neuroscience
  6.                NEURO 318 – Neuroscience of Brain Disorders
     
  7.           Applied:
    1.          PSYC 220 – Psychology of Health
    2.          PSYC 222 – Educational Psychology
    3.          PSYC 224 – Psychological Disorders
    4.          PSYC 229 [F11] – Developmental Psychology: Infant and Childhood [F11]
    5.          PSYC 230 – Adolescent Development
    6.          PSYC 311 – Counseling Psychology
    7.          PSYC 326 – Learning and Motivation
    8.          PSYC 451-452 – Research Practicum (4 credits)
  8.  

   3. Senior Experience (4 credits)

  1. Either MUSC 485-486 or PSYC 485 as recommended by advisor and topic availability. The culminating Senior Seminar research project is required to integrate the fields of Music and Psychology.
  2. Other suggested courses to complement this course of study include:
    1. EDUC 201 - Foundations of Education
    2. EDUC 460  – Internship in Education [F11]
    3. FYWS 151  – American Music and Politics [F2s]
    4. MUSC 160-178 – Lessons. Four additional semesters of lessons and ensembles are recommended. (especially guitar and/or voice for applied/therapy track)
    5. MUSC 190-198 – Ensembles
    6. PHIL 270 – Philosophy of Education [F11]
    7. PHIL 328 – Philosophy of Mind and Consciousness
    8. PHYS 107 – Physics of Sound and Music [F7]
    9. PSYC 338 – Psychological Assessment
    10. PSYC 460 – Internship in Psychology
    11. PSYC 495-496 – Honors Tutorial
    12. 460 Other Internship [F11]

Political Science and International Studies

A total of 12 courses (48 credits) as follows:

  1. International Studies: 110, 120, 300, one two-course sequence, and an additional course at 200-level or above.
  2. Political Science: POLS 151; POLS 340 or 360; another 300 level course from among the following courses in American politics and policy (301, 305, 308, 318, 320, 321, 330, 340, 370); one of the following courses in political theory (212, 214, 218, 230, 314); one additional course at the 200 level or above. (POLS 262,263, 264, do not count toward the Political Science and International Studies Interdisciplinary major.)
  3. Economics 100.
  4. International Studies 485 or Political Science 485.
  5. An appropriate foreign language through completion of the second year (202.)

Russian Studies and International Studies

A total of 16 courses (64 credits) as follows:

  1. Russian 202, 205, 255, 410, 486.
  2. Two of the following: Russian 301, 302, 309.
  3. Russian 212 or 215.
  4. International Studies 110, 120, 284, 300, 485, and one additional course at 200-level or above.
  5. Economics 100.
  6. One of the following: Political Science 151, Political Science 215, or History 229.

Latin American Studies

The Latin American Studies program includes a strong language component and brings together courses from six departments: Anthropology/Sociology, Economics, History, Modern Languages (Spanish), Music, and International Studies.

Honors in Latin American Studies

  1. Completion of all requirements for the Latin American Studies major.
  2. Completion of Latin American Studies 495-496.
  3. Completion and public presentation of a substantial research project.

Project proposal must be approved by the Latin American Studies Committee by April of the junior year.

Latin American Studies: Program Committee

  • Elizabeth Pettinaroli, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures (Chair)
  • Bruno Badia, Department of Economics
  • Sarah Boyle, Department of Biology
  • Tyler Fritts, Department of Music
  • Eric Henager, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
  • David Jilg, Department of Theatre
  • Michael LaRosa, Department of History
  • Jeanne Lopiparo, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
  • Jaqueline Oliveira, Department of Economics
  • Alberto del Pozo Martinez, Department of Modern Languages and Literatures
  • Ryan Rasmussen, Department of Art
  • Amy Risley, Department of International Studies

Requirements for a Major in Latin American Studies

A total of forty-two to forty-four (42-44) credits as follows:

  1. Latin American Studies 200: Introduction to Latin American Studies.
  2. Latin American Studies 485: Senior Seminar.
  3. Nine of the following courses from at least four different departments. No more than three courses in any one department may count toward the major:
  • Anthropology/Sociology 224: Latin America Before 1492.
  • Anthropology/Sociology 265: Intro. Topics in Anthropology and Sociology (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • Anthropology/Sociology 325: The Maya and Their World.
  • Anthropology/Sociology 327: Gender and Power in Latin America.
  • Anthropology/Sociology 365: Cultural Motifs (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • Anthropology/Sociology 379: Anthropology of Social Change (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • Biology 160: An International Experience in Health Care.
  • Economics 100: Introduction to Economics.
  • Economics 265: Economics of Education.
  • History 105: Special Topics (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • History 205: Special Topics (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • History 261: Colonial Latin America.
  • History 262: Modern Latin America.
  • History 267: Modern Mexico.
  • History 363: History of US-Latin American Relations.
  • History 364: History of Religion in Latin America.
  • History 365: Infinite Border: The United States and Mexico in Historic Perspective.
  • History 405: Advances Seminars (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • Humanities 201: Search in Latin America.
  • International Studies 120: Introduction to Comparative Politics.
  • International Studies 265: Topics in International Studies. (when the topic focuses on Latin America).
  • International Studies 266: Topics in International Studies (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • International Studies 273: Government and Politics of Latin America.
  • International Studies 274: Issues in US-Latin American Relations.
  • International Studies 310: Comparative Political Economy.
  • International Studies 311: International Political Economy.
  • International Studies 332 (Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • Latin American Studies 099: Special Topics in Latin American Studies.
  • Latin American Studies 265: Special Topics in Latin American Studies.
  •  Latin American Studies 365: Advanced Special Topics in Latin American Studies.
  • Music 119: Music of Latin America.
  • Spanish 302: Culture and Composition (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • Spanish 306: Introduction to Latin American Cultures and Literatures.
  • Spanish 309: Spanish in Latin America.
  • Spanish 310: US-Latino Literatures and Cultures.
  • Spanish 315: Theory and Latin American Literature.
  • Spanish 320: Spanish American Drama.
  • Spanish 323: Space and Place.
  • Spanish 325: Community Publishing/Cartoneras in LA and Memphis.
  • Spanish 330: Spanish American Poetry.
  • Spanish 340: Colonial and Global Visions in Spanish American Literatures.
  • Spanish 360: Gender in Spanish American Literature.
  • Spanish 365: Special Topics in Spanish (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • Spanish 370: Contemporary Southern Cone Literature.
  • Spanish 375: Contemporary Central American Literature.
  • Spanish 405: Literature of Mexico after 1911.
  • Spanish 406: Contemporary Novel of Spanish America.
  • Spanish 408: Spanish American Short Story.
  • Spanish 426: Imperial Discourses of the Hispanic World.

        And other courses by approval of the Director of the LAS Program

        Questions: Contact Prof. Elizabeth Pettinaroli--pettinarolie@rhodes.edu

Requirements for a Minor in Latin American Studies

A total of twenty-two to twenty-four (22-24) credits as follows:

  1. Latin American Studies 200.
  2. Five of the following courses from at least three different departments
    (Latin American Studies 460 does not count toward the three-department
    distribution.
  • Anthropology/Sociology 224: Latin America Before 1492.
  • Anthropology/Sociology 265: Intro. Topics in Anthropology and Sociology (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • Anthropology/Sociology 325: The Maya and Their World.
  • Anthropology/Sociology 327: Gender and Power in Latin America.
  • Anthropology/Sociology 365: Cultural Motifs (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • Anthropology/Sociology 379: Anthropology of Social Change (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • Biology 160: An International Experience in Health Care.
  • Economics 100: Introduction to Economics.
  • Economics 265: Economics of Education.
  • History 105: Special Topics (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • History 205: Special Topics (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • History 261: Colonial Latin America.
  • History 262: Modern Latin America.
  • History 267: Modern Mexico.
  • History 363: History of US-Latin American Relations.
  • History 364: History of Religion in Latin America.
  • History 365: Infinite Border: The United States and Mexico in Historic Perspective.
  • History 405: Advances Seminars (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • Humanities 201: Search in Latin America.
  • International Studies 120: Introduction to Comparative Politics.
  • International Studies 265: Topics in International Studies. (when the topic focuses on Latin America).
  • International Studies 266: Topics in International Studies (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • International Studies 273: Government and Politics of Latin America.
  • International Studies 274: Issues in US-Latin American Relations.
  • International Studies 310: Comparative Political Economy.
  • International Studies 311: International Political Economy.
  • International Studies 332 (Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • Latin American Studies 099: Special Topics in Latin American Studies.
  • Latin American Studies 265: Special Topics in Latin American Studies.
  •  Latin American Studies 365: Advanced Special Topics in Latin American Studies.
  • Music 119: Music of Latin America.
  • Spanish 302: Culture and Composition (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • Spanish 306: Introduction to Latin American Cultures and Literatures.
  • Spanish 309: Spanish in Latin America.
  • Spanish 310: US-Latino Literatures and Cultures.
  • Spanish 315: Theory and Latin American Literature.
  • Spanish 320: Spanish American Drama.
  • Spanish 323: Space and Place.
  • Spanish 325: Community Publishing/Cartoneras in LA and Memphis.
  • Spanish 330: Spanish American Poetry.
  • Spanish 340: Colonial and Global Visions in Spanish American Literatures.
  • Spanish 360: Gender in Spanish American Literature.
  • Spanish 365: Special Topics in Spanish (LA/Hispanic/Latino/a topic).
  • Spanish 370: Contemporary Southern Cone Literature.
  • Spanish 375: Contemporary Central American Literature.
  • Spanish 405: Literature of Mexico after 1911.
  • Spanish 406: Contemporary Novel of Spanish America.
  • Spanish 408: Spanish American Short Story.
  • Spanish 426: Imperial Discourses of the Hispanic World.

       And other courses by approval of the Director of the LAS Program

       Questions: Contact Prof. Elizabeth Pettinaroli--pettinarolie@rhodes.edu

Neuroscience

Neuroscience at Rhodes provides students with a nuanced understanding of the methodological challenges and conceptual issues that lie at the heart of efforts to understand the function of the nervous system and its role in behavior.

Honors in Neuroscience

In addition to maintaining a cumulative and major GPA of at least 3.5, honors candidates are required to enroll in Neuroscience 399 in the Spring of their junior year. By the start of the senior year, the candidate must submit a proposal for an independent research project for approval by the Program Committee. Up to 8 credits of Neuroscience 495-496 are taken each semester of the senior year. In addition to submitting a written report, the candidate is required to make an oral presentation at the conclusion of the research project. The honors degree in Neuroscience is contingent upon committee acceptance of the research manuscript.

Neuroscience: Program Committee

Mauricio Cafiero, Department of Chemistry
Kelly Dougherty, Department of Biology
Kim Gerecke, Department of Psychology, Chair
Jason Haberman, Department of Psychology
David Kabelik, Department of Biology
Rebecca Klatzkin, Department of Psychology
Katie White, Department of Psychology

Requirements for a Major in Neuroscience Leading to the B.S. Degree

A total of fifty-three to fifty-six (53-56) credits as follows:

  1. Eight (8) core requirements:
    1. Chemistry 120-120L
    2. Biology 130-131L
    3. Biology 140-141L
    4. Psychology 150
    5. Psychology 211 or Mathematics 211
    6. Neuroscience 270
    7. Neuroscience 350 - (this course will cease after Fall 2017; depth courses will instead be paired with labs beginning in 2018-2019)
    8. Neuroscience 485/486
  2. Two (2) depth requirements:
    1. Biology 375 or Biology 376; AND either Neuroscience 318 or Psychology 345
  3. Three (3) breadth courses from the following:
    1. Biology 204, 207, 303 or 304+304L, 307, 325, 340
    2. Chemistry 414, 416
    3. Neuroscience 451-452 (4 credits total)
    4. Psychology 216, 220, 224, 306, 327, 353
    5. Philosophy 250 (Philosophy of Neuroscience topic only), 328
    6. Up to two additional depth courses
  4. Courses recommended but not required:
    1. Chemistry 211-212
    2. Computer Science 141
    3. Mathematics 115
    4. Physics 111-112 (with laboratory)
    5. Political Science 216

Political Economy

Political Economy at Rhodes entails the study of the important works that laid the foundations of economic and political systems throughout the world, the major critiques of those systems, and the quandaries and disputes that arise at the intersection of politics and economics

Political Economy: Program Committee

Stephen J. Ceccoli, Department of International Studies
Daniel E. Cullen, Department of Political Science
Marshall K. Gramm, Department of Economics 
Teresa Beckham Gramm, Department of Economics
Renee J. Johnson, Department of Political Science
John E. Murray, Department of Economics, Chair
Robert F. Saxe, Department of History
Patrick A. Shade, Department of Philosophy
Stephen H. Wirls, Department of Political Science

Requirements for a Major in Political Economy

A total of 12 courses (48 credits) as follows:

  1. Economics 100 and 323; either Economics 201 or 202.
  2. International Studies 311.
  3. Political Science 110, 205, 218, 314.
  4. Political Economy 486.
  5. Tracks (choose one):
    • Global Track
      • Three electives (two of which must be outside of Economics) from Economics 310, 312; International Studies 220, 221, 263, 282, 340, 341, 451.
    • Historical Track
      • Three electives from Economics 339; Greek and Roman Studies 270; History 255, 256, 351, 352, 436, 439.
    • Philosophical Track
      • Philosophy 301 and two electives (one of which must be outside of Political Science) from English 265 (Literature and Economics); Philosophy 255, 303, 355; Political Science 212, 214, 230, 411.
    • Policy Track
      • Either Economics 290 or Political Science 270.
      • Two electives from Economics 305, 310, 420; Political Science 209, 280, 305, 320, 370, 470; Psychology 309.

Self-Designed Interdisciplinary Majors

The option of a self-designed interdisciplinary major is available for those students whose academic goals may best be achieved by combining and integrating the work of two or more academic departments. Like the College’s other interdisciplinary programs, the self-designed interdisciplinary major exists to provide an appropriate structure for programs of study that do not fit within the bounds of existing departments and require an interdisciplinary approach.

The majors currently offered by the College’s academic departments and interdisciplinary programs are carefully designed and rigorously reviewed by the faculty for intellectual depth and coherence. Students who wish to propose a self-designed course of study should expect that their proposals will be held to the same standards. The self-designed interdisciplinary major petition process therefore requires a significant amount of time and reflection. Students wishing to pursue this option will work closely with their advising faculty in the relevant departments to construct their proposal and to see their study through to completion.

Students who wish to pursue a self-designed interdisciplinary major must complete the required “Declaration of Interdisciplinary Major” form. In completing that form, students should follow the steps below in order to meet the rigorous criteria for the proposed program of study.

  1. Consult with faculty members in the departments that will be combined in the major to determine the feasibility of the interdisciplinary major. Consultation with the Registrar is also recommended in order to secure an understanding of the approval procedure.
  2. Prepare, in consultation with those faculty members and departments, a petition requesting the College Faculty’s approval of the interdisciplinary major. This petition is addressed to the Chairperson of the Faculty Educational Program Committee. The petition must contain the following items:
    1. An essay that articulates the student’s rationale for the interdisciplinary major. Simply explaining how courses in different departments are related is not a sufficient rationale. The rationale must specifically explain why the academic goals of the self-designed major cannot be achieved through a combination of majors and minor(s). The petitioner must demonstrate that only by integrating work in the departments can those academic goals be realized. The importance of this essay cannot be overemphasized. It is not only a statement of the student’s reasons for choosing the proposed interdisciplinary major, but also a philosophical and practical statement of (i) how the new major meets the same rigorous standards as the College’s already-existing majors, (ii) how the proposed course-plan will include truly “interdisciplinary” study, (iii) how, if there are similar programs or majors at other comparable institutions, the proposed plan for interdisciplinary study compares to those.
    2. The Declaration of Interdisciplinary Major, including a complete listing of courses that comprise the interdisciplinary major, with numbers, titles, and dates when the courses are to be taken. Though it is customary that the number of courses in each department will be fewer than what is expected of a major in that department, it is essential that substantial advanced work is done in each department. The proposed program of study must include a complete description of how the “interdisciplinary” senior experience will be structured. It must be clear how the departments involved in the major will be integrated into the senior seminar, seminars, or capstone experience. Any self-designed capstone experience should be explained in detail and should be comparable in content, rigor, and methodology to the capstone experiences for existing majors.
  3. The Declaration of Interdisciplinary Major must be endorsed in writing by the chairpersons of the concerned departments. This endorsement must include a detailed assessment of the student’s rationale and of the student’s ability to undertake and complete successfully the work projected in the petition. The departmental endorsements should also specify who will serve as the principal faculty advisor for the student. If the student’s petition includes coursework or other projects outside of the participating departments’ normal course offerings, the chairpersons should also note their awareness of those elements of the proposal and give assurances that those or comparable opportunities will be available for the student.
  4. The entire Declaration of Interdisciplinary Major with the completed petition is submitted to the Registrar for review before it is sent to the Education Program Committee for a full review and final determination. Incomplete Declarations will be returned to the student without review.
  5. Interdisciplinary majors must be declared and receive approval no later than midterm of the spring semester of the junior year. It is expected that work on the petition, interviews with faculty, and consultation with the Registrar should begin as early as possible, but will take place no later than the fall semester of the junior year. The student who submits an interdisciplinary major petition will have already declared a major by midterm of the spring semester of the sophomore year. If the interdisciplinary major can be worked out in time for the sophomore year deadline for declaring a major, it should be submitted earlier.
  6. Any proposed deviation from an approved interdisciplinary major must have departmental approvals and the approval of the Education Program Committee before changes are made in the course of study.

Urban Studies

The Urban Studies Program enables students to explore and understand the urban experience in its richness and complexity. It provides an interdisciplinary learning experience grounded in the liberal arts and connected to concerns of the region and the world. Through integrative teaching and research, students develop and apply the skills needed to analyze the dynamic processes and structures of urban life as well the ways that cities contribute to global change. Students engage fully with Memphis and the diversity of the Mid-south region, combining course work with urban field experiences including internships, fellowships, and research with community partners.

International Study

Many Urban Studies students spend a semester abroad and some of the courses may be eligible for Urban Studies credit. However, students must provide the program director with the course information before beginning the program. There are also some programs that are more appropriate for Urban Studies students such as IHP “Cities in the 21st Century” and DIS “Urban Studies in Europe.”

Requirements for a Major in Urban Studies

A total of forty four (44) credits as follows:

  1. Urban Studies 201: Introduction to Urban Studies
  2. Political Science 206: Urban Politics and Policy
  3. One 4 credit course on Race and Ethnicity in the United States
    1. Race and Ethnicity in American Society (Anthropology/Sociology 331)
    2. African American History (History 242)
    3. Black Political Thought (Political Science 230)
    4. Black Theology (Religious Studies topics course)
    5. The Civil Rights Movement (History 243)
    6. Intercultural Knowledge and Competence (Urban Studies 250) 
      (other courses may fulfill this requirement, but will require permission of the Director of Urban Studies)
  4. Urban Studies 385: Research Methods in Urban Studies
  5. One 4 credit course that provides an Urban Field Experience
    1. Urban Studies 362: Urban Field Research
    2. Urban Studies 460 (1): Internship - Urban Studies Concentration
    3. Urban Studies 460 (2): Internship - Urban and Community Health Concentration
    4. Religious Studies 460: Health Equity Internship 
      *Students in the Urban and Community Health Concentration must take Urban Studies 460 (2) or Religious Studies 460.
  6. Urban Studies 485: Senior Seminar
  7. Urban Studies Concentration (typically five, 4 credit courses).
    *In each concentration, one course must address historical and/or comparative perspectives on the urban experience.
      1. Concentration in Urban and Community Health 
        The following two courses are required as part of the concentration:
        1. Medical Sociology (Anthropology/Sociology 347), Introduction to Urban and Community Health (Urban Studies 240), Faith, Health and Justice (Religious Studies 232), Principles of Public Health (Urban Studies 235), or Anthropology of Health (Anthropology/Sociology 265)
        2. Community Psychology (Psychology 250) or Psychology of Health (Psychology 220)
          Three elective courses may be chosen from the following list. Only two of the three electives may come from the same department or program. One of these courses must be must be taken at the 300 or 400 level (Urban Studies 460 and Urban Studies 362 do not satisfy this upper level requirement.)
          1. Anthropology of Health (Anthropology/Sociology 265)
          2. Geographic Information Systems (Interdepartmental 225)
          3. Biology of Medicine (Biology 105)
          4. Embryology (Biology 209)
          5. Parasitology (Biology 220)
          6. Genetics (Biology 304 with lab OR Biology 303 without lab)
          7. Molecular Biology (Biology 325)
          8. Virology/Immunology (Biology 330)
          9. Demography of Health (Anthropology/Sociology 265)
          10. Medical Sociology (Anthropology/Sociology 347)
          11. Music and Healing (Music 105)
          12. Medical Ethics (Philosophy 303)
          13. Statistical Methods (Psychology 211)
          14. Psychology of Health (Psychology 220)
          15. Community Psychology (Psychology 250)
          16. Health Care Policy (Political Science 320)
          17. Pain, Suffering, and Death (Religious Studies 233)
          18. Faith, Health, and Justice (Religious Studies 232)
          19. Narrative Perspectives on Religion and Medicine (Religious Studies 300)
          20. Principles of Public Health (Urban Studies 235)
          21. Introduction to Urban and Community Health (Urban Studies 240)
          22. Urban Geography (Urban Studies 230)
          23. Nonprofits in the City (Urban Studies 340)
          24. Right to the City (Urban Studies 365)
          25. Global Health/Global Health Maymester (Biology 160)
          26. Note: Students who concentrate in Urban and Community Health and wish to pursue graduate study in Public Health or the medical professions should contact the Director of Health Professional Advising, in addition to working closely with an Urban Studies faculty advisor. Graduate study in Public Health, for example, typically requires the Introductory Biology Sequence and Statistics.
      2. Concentration in Urban Studies
        Five courses are selected from the Urban Studies Electives with the support of a faculty advisor in Urban Studies. These courses should support student interests and future goals. 
        *At least one additional methods course is strongly encouraged. Only one additional methods course may count as an elective for the major.
        Additional Research Methods Courses:
        1. Introduction to GIS (Interdepartmental 225)
        2. Statistical Analysis for Economics and Business (Economics 290)
        3. Statistical Methods (Psychology 211)
        4. Urban Field Research (Urban Studies 362)
        5. Research Practicum (Urban Studies 451/452)

*No more than two electives may come from any one academic department.

*Two electives must be taken at the 300 or 400 level (Urban Studies 460 and Urban Studies 362 do not satisfy this upper level requirement)

Urban Studies Electives that are regularly offered are listed below. Urban Studies elective courses may be added during the school year, including topics courses as appropriate. During registration, check Banner Web or the Urban Studies Program office for a complete list of Urban Studies electives. Other courses may be used to fulfill the major requirement provided the courses: 1) contain an urban institutional or urban issues focus, and 2) are approved for major credit by the Director of Urban Studies.

Urban Studies Electives:

  • Race and Ethnicity in American Society (Anthropology/Sociology 331)
  • Medical Sociology (Anthropology/Sociology 347)
  • Sociology of Education (Anthropology/Sociology 341)
  • The City (Anthropology/Sociology 241)
  • Urban Design (Art 265)
  • Environmental Science (Biology 120)
  • Management of Organizations (Business 361)
  • Public Economics (Economics 305)
  • Foundations of Education (Education 201)
  • Race, Class, Gender, and Sexuality in Education (Education 320)
  • Environmental Geology (Geology 214)
  • African American History (History 242)
  • The Civil Rights Movement (History 243)
  • History of Poverty in the United States (History 249)
  • Urban History (History 205)
  • Black Political Thought (Political Science 230)
  • Public Policy Analysis (Political Science 305)
  • Community Psychology (Psychology 250)
  • Infant and Child Development (Psychology 229)
    Community and Program Evaluation (Psychology 350)
  • Health Equity Internship (Religious Studies 460)
  • Introduction to Urban and Community Health (Urban Studies 240)
  • Urban Geography (Urban Studies 230)
  • Intercultural Knowledge and Competence (Urban Studies 250)
  • Music and Community in Memphis (Urban Studies 262)
  • Topics in Urban Studies (Urban Studies 265)
  • Nonprofits in the City (Urban Studies 340)
  • Right to the City (Urban Studies 365)
    Music and Community in Memphis (Urban Studies 382)
  • Internship (Urban Studies 460)

Requirements for a Minor in Urban Studies

A total of 24 credits as follows:

  1. Introduction to Urban Studies (Urban Studies 201)
  2. Research Methods in Urban Studies (Urban Studies 385)
  3. One 4 credit course that provides an Urban Field Experience
    1. Urban Studies 362: Urban Field Research
    2. Urban Studies 460 (1 or 2): Internship.
    3. Religious Studies 460: Health Equity Internship. 

      Two of these courses may count toward the minor; only one is required. If two courses are taken, two additional courses should be selected from the urban studies curriculum rather than three courses as noted below.
  4. Three courses selected from the Urban Studies Curriculum (including Urban Studies major requirements and electives.) Two of these courses must come from fields outside of one’s major. No more than two courses may come from any one academic department. One course must be taken at the 300 or 400 level (the Urban Field Experiences courses do not satisfy this upper level requirement.)

Courses in the Urban Studies Major and Urban Studies Electives that are regularly offered are listed under the major. Urban Studies elective courses may be added during the school year, including topics courses as appropriate. During registration, check Banner Web or the Urban Studies Program office for a complete list of Urban Studies electives. Other courses may be used to fulfill the minor requirement provided the courses: 1) contain an urban institutional or urban issues focus, and 2) are approved for minor credit by the Director of Urban Studies.

Requirements for a Minor in Urban and Community Health

A total of 24 credits as follows:

  1. Introduction to Urban Studies (Urban Studies 201)
  2. Urban Studies Internship: Urban and Community Health Concentration (Urban Studies 460-02) or Health Equity Internship (Religious Studies 460)
  3. Four electives courses chosen from the list of electives in the Urban and Community Health Concentration (see Urban Studies Major requirements and electives.) No more than two courses may come from any one academic department. One elective course must be taken at the 300 or 400 level.

Urban Studies: Program Commitee

John Bass, Department of Music 
Sarah Boyle, Department of Biology
Zachary Casey, Educational Studies Program
Erin Cue, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow
Anita Davis, Department of Psychology
Keith Gibson, Department of Political Science
Peter Hossler, Urban Studies Program
Kendra Hotz, Department of Religious Studies
Charles Hughes, The Memphis Center at Rhodes College
Evelyn Perry, Department of Anthropology and Sociology
Elizabeth Pettinaroli, Modern Languages, Latin American Studies
Amy Risley, International Studies
Zandria Robinson, Department of Anthopology and Sociology
Charles Snyder, Health Advising
Elizabeth Thomas, Department of Psychology and Director of Urban Studies
Shaolu Yu, Mellon Postdoctoral Fellow

International Studies

The Department of International Studies prepares students to understand international politics, foreign policy making, political development, international law, international organization, security and defense policy, and the politics and cultures of various countries and regions of the world.

 

Areas of Concentration

Area A: Global Leadership - includes courses numbered at the 300-level or 400-level (excluding IS 300, IS 485, and IS 495-6)

Area B: Regional Leadership - includes region-specific courses numbered at the 200-level (excluding IS 200, IS 235, and IS 256)

Other Courses (these can be either A or B area courses):

133: Model United Nations

235: Great Decisions in U.S. Foreign Policy

265-266: Selected Topics in International Studies

270: Research Methods

450: Washington Semester

460: Internship in International Studies

470: Summer Internship Abroad (Mertie W. Buckman International Internship Program)

Honors in International Studies

Required: Completing Honors in the Department of International Studies is comprised of two semesters (Fall and Spring). Students must enroll in International Studies 485 in the Fall semester of the year in which the student intends to complete the Honors Project and gain departmental approval of a research proposal. Students will select a first and second reader for the Honors Project and a third member will be selected by the department. Students should consult with an International Studies faculty member about their intentions to pursue an honors project prior to the beginning of the fall semester and obtain a copy of the “Honors in International Studies Guidelines.” A minimum GPA of 3.70 in all course work and approval of the department are required.

International Studies: Faculty and Staff

Professors

Stephen J. Ceccoli. 1998. P.K. Seidman Professor of Political Economy. B.A., Heidelberg College; M.A., Ph.D., Washington University. (International relations, political economy, comparative public policy.)

Nikolaos Zahariadis. 2016. Mertie Buckman Distinguished Professor of International Studies. B.A., Slippery Rock University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Georgia. (European Politics, International relations, comparative politics.)

Associate Professors

Esen Kirdis. 2011. J.S. Seidman Research Fellow. B.A., Koc University, Istanbul, Turkey; Ph.D., University of Minnesota, Twin Cities. (Middle East politics, Islamic politics, international relations, comparative politics.)

Shadrack W. Nasong’o. 2005. Stanley J. Buckman Professor of International Studies. B.A. and M.A., University of Nairobi, Kenya; Ph.D., Northeastern University, Boston. (African politics, comparative politics, international relations.)

Amy E. Risley. 2005. Chair. B.A., University of Wisconsin, Madison; M.A., New York University; Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin. (Latin American politics, comparative politics, international relations.)

Jennifer D. Sciubba. 2008. B.A., Agnes Scott College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Maryland. (Political demography, environmental politics, international relations.)

Assistant Professors

Chien-Kai Chen. 2013. B.A., National Taiwan University; M.A., The University of Alabama, Tuscaloosa; Ph.D., Boston University. (East Asian Politics, Comparative Politics, International Relations.)

Carolin Maney Purser. 2017.  B.A., Colby College; Ph.D., University of Georgia, Athens. (Comparative politics, international relations, human security.)

Adjunct Professor

Yasir Kazi. 2010. B.Sc. University of Houston; B.A. and M.A., University of Madinah, Saudi Arabia; M.A., M. Phil., Ph.D., Yale University. (Islamic Studies.)

Staff

J. Barron Boyd. 2012. Coordinator, Buckman International Studies Initiative. B.A., Rhodes College; M.A. and Ph.D., University of South Carolina. (International politics, International Human Rights, South African Politics.)
Kimberly A. Stevenson. 2008 Departmental Assistant. B.S., University of Memphis.

Requirements for a Major in International Studies

A total of fifty-two (52) credits as follows:

1. Required courses: International Studies 110, 120, 270, 300, 485.

2. Economics 100 or International Studies 311.

3. Political Science 151 or 214.

4. Twenty (20) additional credits in International Studies with at least 8 credits from each area (A - Global Leadership, and B - Regional Leadership).

5. Completion of courses in a foreign language through the second full year at the college level (through the 202-level). Any 4-credit foreign language course above the 202-level and taught in the foreign language could also be used to satisfy the language requirement.

6. Each student in the major will be required to complete an international experience. There are several ways to complete this requirement subject to the approval of the Department Chair. Students may take a study abroad course approved by the Rhodes College study abroad office; an internship in International Studies, INTS 460; or the Model UN course, INTS 133, four times. Any such international experience with course credit would count toward No. 4 above.

The Department of International Studies offers a number of interdisciplinary majors in collaboration with other departments. These majors include International Studies/Economics; International Studies/History; International Studies/Political Science; and International Studies/Russian Studies. 

 

Requirements for a Minor in International Studies

A total of twenty-four (24) credits as follows:

1. International Studies 110, 120.

2. Two-course sequence numbered 200 or above in either area A or B.

3. Two additional courses at 200-level or above (I.S. 300 is recommended.)

Master of Science in Accounting

Rhodes College offers a 32-credit program of study in accounting and business leading to the Master of Science in Accounting degree. The M.S. in Accounting is a professional master’s degree designed to provide a mature understanding of accepted professional practices in the field of accounting and to support entry and advancement in the various fields of professional accounting.

Additional Information

The M.S. in Accounting program office hours are 8:00 a.m. - 4:00 p.m. Monday through Friday (CST). For additional information, contact:

Dr. Pamela Church
Director of M.S. in Accounting Program
Rhodes College
2000 North Parkway
Memphis, Tennessee 38112-1690
Telephone 901-843-3920
church@rhodes.edu

Academic Regulations

The M.S. in Accounting program abides by the same academic regulations as the undergraduate program at Rhodes, with the exceptions noted below.

Registration

Qualification as a full-time, degree student requires registration for a minimum of eight (8) credits in a semester. Degree-seeking students who register for seven (7) credits or less in any one semester are classified as part-time students.

Pass-Fail

A student may enroll in a class on a pass-fail basis. Permission of the instructor and the Director of the M.S. in Accounting is required and must be obtained during the first three weeks of the class in a semester. The Pass/Fail option may not be used to satisfy any of the graduate course requirements for the M.S. in Accounting degree.

Academic Probation and Suspension

To maintain acceptable scholastic standing and to graduate, a student must have an overall grade point average of 3.000 (B) for all graduate work attempted. The Graduate Committee places on academic probation any student whose cumulative grade point average at the end of a semester falls below the minimum standard. Notification of academic probation will be printed on the student grade report. A student on academic probation is not considered to be in good academic standing. Such students are ineligible to participate in some extracurricular activities, including intercollegiate athletics. A student is removed from academic probation upon attainment of a 3.000 average in graduate courses. A student placed on academic probation because of a grade point average below 3.000 has one academic semester of course work to raise his or her average to the required 3.000. If the grade point average is not raised to a 3.000, he or she may be dropped from the program. Any student who earns a D or an F in any graduate course may be dismissed immediately from the program.

Admission

Admissions Procedure

A student who wishes to apply for admission to the M.S. program should print an application form from the Rhodes College website. The completed form should be mailed to the Director of the M.S. in Accounting program with a nonrefundable application fee of twenty-five dollars.

All applicants for admission to the M.S. in Accounting program are required to submit transcripts from all colleges attended and three letters of reference.

All applicants to the graduate program must have an earned baccalaureate from an accredited institution before being admitted into the program.

Standardized Tests

Non-Rhodes applicants are required to take the Graduate Management Admissions Test (GMAT). Rhodes students may choose to submit a GMAT score as part of the application package. Any student planning to apply to the program for fall admission should plan to take the test no later than December so that his or her scores will be available for the Graduate Admissions Committee by March 1. Test application forms may be obtained from some colleges and universities or from the GMAT website at www.mba.com. Applicants whose university instruction was not in English are also required to take the Test of English as a Foreign Language and achieve a score of 550 or above.

Provisional Admission

A limited number of students who would be denied admission based on test scores, letters of recommendation, personal interviews and transcripts may be admitted provisionally to the program if they can demonstrate high probability of success in the program and likelihood of outstanding performance in the profession of accounting in some other manner. Other criteria may include, for example, a record of outstanding performance in a job with increasing levels of responsibility over time. Any student provisionally admitted to the program must attain a grade point average of at least a 3.00 (B) on the first twelve hours of the program completed in order to remain in the program.

Admission of Special Students (Non-degree Candidates)

Students who give evidence of sufficient ability may be admitted as special students to a course offered as part of the M.S. in Accounting curriculum. Special students may take no more than two courses. After two courses, which may total no more than eight credits, the student must make formal application to the M.S. in Accounting program and be accepted into it before taking any additional graduate courses. An undergraduate student in his or her senior year may petition the graduate committee to enroll in a graduate course as a special student. In such a case, no graduate credit will be granted for courses used to satisfy undergraduate requirements. A student may apply no more than a total of four graduate credits earned as a special student and/or for transfer credit toward the requirements for the M.S. in Accounting at Rhodes.

Readmission of Students

The M.S. in Accounting degree must be completed within three academic years from the date of initial enrollment as a degree candidate. Failure to complete the degree requirements within this time will result in being dropped from the program. Any student who wants to continue the program after being dropped must petition the Director for reinstatement.

Expenses and Financial Aid

The tuition charges, regulations for payment and withdrawal, activity fees, and special fees and deposits for the M.S. in Accounting are the same as for the undergraduate program at Rhodes. These charges and policies are outlined in the “Expenses” portion of the catalogue. Room charges and policies are also the same as those for the undergraduate programs; however, on-campus rooms will be made available to graduate students only after all undergraduate demand has been satisfied.

Financial Aid

Financial assistance for students in the M.S. in Accounting program will be in the form of loans and scholarships.

Loans

Graduate students are currently eligible for Federal Stafford Loans up to $20,500 per year. Federal Stafford Loans are made on an unsubsidized basis, and the student is responsible for interest payment during periods of enrollment. Repayment begins six months after the student graduates or ceases to be enrolled at least half-time. The interest rate is fixed at 6.8%.

Anyone interested in the student loan program should contact:

Office of Financial Aid
Rhodes College
2000 N. Parkway
Memphis, TN 38112-1690
Telephone 901-843-3810

Scholarships

All applicants are automatically considered for a departmental scholarship with no additional forms required to be filed. Departmental scholarships for students in the M.S. in Accounting program are merit based; financial need is not a consideration. Selection for a scholarship is based upon the candidate’s academic record, personal achievements, and promise of success in accounting.

Master in Accounting: Faculty and Staff

ASSOCIATE PROFESSORS

Dee Birnbaum. 1991. B.A., State University of New York at Stony Brook; M.B.A., Baruch College; M.Phil., Ph.D., City University of New York. (General management; human resource management.)
Pamela H. Church. 1988. Director, M.S. in Accounting Program. B.S., M.S., University of Memphis; Ph.D., University of Houston. C.P.A. (Accountancy.)

ASSISTANT PROFESSORS

Kayla D. Booker. 2015. B.B.A., M.P.A., Ph.D., Jackson State University. C.P.A. (Accountancy.)
Sujan M. Dan. 2013. B.Tech, Kerala University, India; M.S., Ph.D., Texas A&M University. (Marketing.)
Andrey Zagorchev. 2013. B.S., M.S., Plovdiv University, Bulgaria; M.B.A., Wright State University; Ph.D., Lehigh University. (Finance.)

PART-TIME ASSISTANT PROFESSOR

Milton L. Lovell. 2003. B.S., J.D., University of Mississippi. LL.M., New York University School of Law. Chief Financial Officer and General Counsel, nexAir, LLC (Accountancy; taxation.)

INSTRUCTOR

Jade O. Planchon. 2012. B.A., Rhodes College; M.B.A., Columbia University. (Finance.)

PART-TIME INSTRUCTOR

Chris Nunn. 2010. B.A., M.S., Rhodes College. Chief Financial Officer, Security Bancorp of Tennessee, Inc. (Accountancy.)

STAFF

Linda Gibson. 2006. Departmental Assistant. B.A., Vanderbilt University; M.L.S., George Peabody College.

Requirements for the M.S. Degree

A total of thirty (32) credits as follows:

Required courses. (28 credits):

  1. Business 641: Seminar in Financial Accounting Theory and Research.
  2. Business 643: Seminar in Accounting Control.
  3. Business 644: Accounting for Governmental and Not-for-Profit Entities.
  4. Business 645: Taxation of Business Organizations.
  5. Business 646: Consolidations and Advanced Accounting Topics.
  6. Business 647: Legal and Regulatory Environment of Business.
  7. Business 648: Systems Auditing.

Elective course. (4 credits) One 500- or 600-level course in the Department of Business.

Changes in Degree Requirements

A student may satisfy the requirements for an M.S. in Accounting degree as described in any catalogue that has been in effect during the student’s enrollment in the M.S. program. Students readmitted to Rhodes may graduate under requirements in effect during the original period of enrollment or by following a program incorporating features of the current and the earlier degree requirements and approved by the Graduate Committee. For students electing to graduate under earlier degree requirements, there is no guarantee that the courses specified in those requirements will be offered.

The Educational Program

The graduate program builds upon the undergraduate study of accounting by introducing more complex accounting practices and reasoning into the functional areas of accounting: cost, tax, auditing and advanced financial. The graduate program also addresses the legal environment of business and business ethics, accounting research, and the theory and methodology of the accounting discipline. It is central to the mission of the program that students be able to communicate effectively, both orally and in writing. A significant component of all graduate courses will be oral presentations and discussions as well as written assignments.

The Curriculum

Core courses and prerequisites. The following courses or their equivalents are required before beginning the graduate program. The graduate committee will evaluate a student’s transcript to determine whether a core course requirement has been met. At the committee’s discretion, a student may be allowed to take certain graduate courses concurrently with these core courses:

  1. Financial Accounting.
  2. Cost Accounting.
  3. Intermediate Accounting I and II.
  4. Federal Income Tax.
  5. Auditing.
  6. Introduction to Economics.

Area courses. A student must complete at least one course, either graduate or undergraduate, in each of the following areas:

  1. Finance.
  2. Management or Marketing.

Transfer Credit

No more than a total of eight graduate credits earned at another institution and/or graduate credit earned as a special student (see above) may be counted toward the M.S. in Accounting at Rhodes. A minimum grade of B- must be earned for any course credit to be transferred.

Transfer Credit Guidelines. The following guidelines are used in evaluating academic work from other institutions for graduate transfer credit.

  1. The institution at which the course work is taken must be an accredited college or university.
  2. Correspondence courses and distance learning (Internet) courses will not be accepted for meeting the program’s prerequisites, area courses, or degree requirements.
  3. To be accepted for credit, each course must be judged comparable in terms of content and quality to a course in the graduate curriculum at Rhodes. The Program Director makes these judgments.
  4. All course work taken at other institutions for which Rhodes receives a transcript will be evaluated for transfer credit, and if acceptable, will be posted to the student’s record.
  5. A maximum of 4 credits (1 credit = 1 semester hour) will be accepted toward the Rhodes M.S. in Accounting degree. Transfer credits based on a quarter system are converted to the Rhodes credit basis using the formula that one quarter hour equals two-thirds credit. Fractional transfer credits will be credited.
  6. Transfer credits are not accepted if the grade is C+ or below. Transfer credits are credited to the Rhodes transcript as credits only; they are not used to determine the grade point average.
  7. Transfer credit may be used to satisfy M.S. degree requirements.

Mathematics and Computer Science

The Department of Mathematics and Computer Science offers students numerous opportunities to develop quantitative reasoning, critical-thinking, problem-solving, and communication skills through its curriculum and extracurricular activities.

 

Honors in Mathematics or Computer Science

Requirements:

  1. Fulfillment of the requirements for the major.
  2. Honors Tutorial: 495 and 496.
  3. Approval by the department is required.

Students should consult with a faculty member about their intentions to pursue an honors project before the end of their Junior year.

 

Mathematics and Computer Science: Faculty and Staff

Associate Professors

Erin N. Bodine. 2010. B.S. and B.A., Harvey Mudd College; Ph.D., University of Tennessee, Knoxville. (Optimal control theory, mathematical ecology, differential equations, discrete difference equations, individual and agent based modeling.)
Eric Gottlieb. 1998. B.S., Antioch College; M.S., University of Washington; Ph.D., University of Miami. (Algebraic combinatorics.) 
Christopher Mouron. 2002. B.S., Lafayette College; M.S. and Ph.D., Texas Tech University. (Topology, continuum theory, discrete dynamical systems.)
Betsy Williams Sanders. 2007. B.S., Millsaps College; M.S. and Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. (Computer graphics and animation.)
Chris Seaton. 2004. Chair. E.C. Ellett Professorship of Mathematics and Computer Science. B.A., Kalamazoo College; Ph.D., University of Colorado at Boulder. (Differential geometry, differential topology, orbifolds, Lie groupoids, singular symplectic reduction, invariant theory.)

Assistant Professors

Ibrahim Abdelrazeq. 2015. B.S., Yarmouk University; M.S., New Mexico State University; Ph.D., University of Ottawa (Time series analysis, financial and actuarial mathematics, parametric and nonparametric goodness of fit tests.)
Sesha Dassanayake. 2017. B.A., Wabash College; M.S., University of Minnesota; M.S., University of Colorado Denver; Ph.D., University of Colorado Denver (Spatio-temporal methods for disease surveillance.)
Rachel M. Dunwell. 2005. B.Sc., Leeds University; M.Sc., Liverpool University, Ph.D., Heriot-Watt University. (Psychometrics.)
Phillip B. Kirlin. 2012. B.S., University of Maryland; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Massachusetts Amherst. (Artificial intelligence, machine learning, music informatics.)
D. Brian Larkins. 2015. B.S., M.S., Ph.D., The Ohio State University.(Parallel programming, programming languages, network security.)
Catherine E. Welsh. 2013. B.S., Ursinus College; M.S., Lehigh University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. (Bioinformatics, computational genetics.)

Staff

K. Michelle Hammontree. Departmental Assistant. B.A., University of Southern Indiana, Evansville.

Planning a Major

Students considering a major in Mathematics or Computer Science should contact the Chair or another member of the department as early as possible to ensure progress is being made toward the major. More information can be found at the department’s web site: www.rhodes.edu/mathcs.
For reasonable progress toward a major in Mathematics, a student should begin the Calculus sequence (Math 121, 122 and 223) at the appropriate level in the first year, and complete the sequence before the Spring of the second year; complete Math 201 in the first year or second year; and complete Math 261 by the end of the second year.
For reasonable progress toward a major in Computer Science, a student should begin the introductory programming sequence (Computer Science 141, 142, 241) in the first year. In the second year, a student should complete Computer Science 172 in fall and Computer Science 231 in the spring. The Mathematics requirements should be completed by the end of the third year.

Requirements for a Major in Computer Science

A total of fifty-three (53) credits as follows:

  1. Computer Science 141, 142, 172, 231, 241, 330, 485, and 486.
  2. Computer Science 350 or 355.
  3. Mathematics 121 and one additional mathematics course.
  4. Three additional four-credit computer science courses numbered above 300, excluding 495 and 496.

Requirements for a Major in Mathematics

A total of forty-nine (49) credits as follows:

  1. Mathematics 121, 122, 201, 223, 261, 386, and four credits of 485 and/or 486.
  2. Six additional four-credit courses from among mathematics courses numbered above 200 or Computer Science 141, including at least four courses numbered above 300, excluding 460, 495, and 496.

Requirements for a Minor in Computer Science

A total of twenty-four (24) credits as follows:

  1. Computer Science 141, 142, 172, 231, and 241.
  2. One additional four-credit computer science course numbered above 300.

Requirements for a Minor in Mathematics

A total of twenty-four (24) credits as follows:

  1. Mathematics 121 and 122.
  2. Four additional four-credit mathematics course numbered above 200, including at least one course numbered above 300.

Modern Languages and Literatures

The Department of Modern Languages and Literatures regularly offers instruction in Chinese, French, German, Russian, and Spanish. Details about the study of each of these languages at Rhodes are found under the subject heading for that specific language. In addition to literature and culture courses in the modern languages, the department also offers some courses in literature and culture in English translation. Classes in Portuguese are available through consortial agreement with the University of Memphis.

The F10 Degree Requirement. The degree requirement in languages may be met by the successful completion of any appropriate four-credit course numbered 201 or higher or by demonstrating proficiency through placement into a language course at a level above 201 and approval by the appropriate language faculty. Students who take 201 (or higher) or the equivalent at another institution can earn transfer credit, but must still demonstrate proficiency (see above) in the specific language before the degree requirement is satisfied. This pertains to languages that are taught at Rhodes. Students who can demonstrate native or near-native proficiency in reading, writing, speaking and listening in a language other than English may petition the department of Modern Languages and Literatures to waive the F10 requirement.

All students who plan to fulfill Rhodes’ foreign language degree requirement in a language they have previously studied for two years or more in high school must take a placement test in that language. For French, German, Russian, and Spanish, scores on that test will be used to place students in the course most appropriate for them at Rhodes. Students with fewer than two years in a language may enter that language at the 101 level. Any student who scores at the 202 level or higher will need to consult with the department to see if he or she fulfills Rhodes’ foreign language requirement. Students wishing to fulfill the F10 requirement in a language not previously studied should sign up for a course numbered 101 in that language. However, a student normally may not take a course numbered 101 in any language for academic credit if two or more years of that language were completed in high school.

In the modern languages, placement tests typically cover reading comprehension and grammar. Literature or culture courses given in translation do not satisfy the foreign language degree requirement.

Chinese

The mission of the current Chinese Studies Program is to educate students in Chinese language, literature, culture, history, politics and religion, and to provide students with academic knowledge and experiences to understand China as both an ancient civilization and an emerging global power.  In this spirit, Chinese Studies majors will also learn to appreciate their own positions vis-á-vis the challenges inherent in China's rise to global prominence, confronting difficult questions of nationalism and ethnocentrism.  As an interdisciplinary program, Chinese Studies draws on faculty expertise from various departments and prepares students for post-graduate studies.  China related employment opportunities and future engagement of China.

Requirements for a Major in Chinese Studies

A total of 36 credits as follows:
1. Chinese 301 (Advanced Chinese I) and 302 (Advanced Chinese II).
    China Maymester may be substituted for one of the above.

2. One of the following:
    Chinese 306: Introduction to East Asian Cultures
    Chinese 314: Introduction to Chinese Culture

3. Two of the following:
    Chinese 305: Modern Chinese Literature in Translation
    Chinese 307: Orientalism and Global China on Screen
    Chinese 315: Gender in Chinese Literature
    Chinese 316: Asian Urbanization/Cinema
    Chinese 320: Contemporary Chinese Cinema
    (Chinese 305-320 can be taken in conjunction with one credit of 311.)
    Chinese 409: Special Topics

4. Two of the following:
    History 282: Traditional China
    History 283: Modern China
    History 481: Cold War in East Asia
    Religious Studies 258/Philosophy 250: Asian Philosophies

5. One of the following:
    INTS 261: Government and Politics of China
    INTS 262: China’s Foreign Policy
    INTS 263: Comparative Political Economy of East Asia
    INTS 264: China-Taiwan-US Relations

6. Chinese 485: Senior Seminar

Requirements for a Minor in Chinese Studies

A total of twenty (20) credits in Chinese language (above the level of intermediate Chinese 202), literature and culture. The credits are spread across the following courses:

  1. 1. Chinese 301 and 302: Advanced Chinese*
  2. 2. Two of the Chinese Literature and Culture courses:
    1. Chinese 205: Modern Chinese Literature in Translation
    2. Chinese 206: Introduction to East Asian Cultures
    3. Chinese 210: Chinese Literary Heritage
    4. Chinese 214: Introduction to Chinese Culture
    5. Chinese 215: Gender in Chinese Literature
    6. Chinese 220: Contemporary Chinese Cinema
  3. 3. One of the following courses:
    1. History 282: Traditional China
    2. History 283: Modern China
    3. International Studies 261: Government and Politics of China
    4. International Studies 262: China’s Foreign Policy

*Students may substitute 409 for 301 or 302.

French

Honors in French

A minimum of 44 hours above the 200-level courses in French; a research paper on a specific literary topic; demonstrated proficiency in spoken and written French; and study abroad (at least one semester.)

Requirements for a Major in French

A total of forty (40) credits as follows:

  1. French 202*.
  2. French 301, 485, 486.
  3. French 321 or 322.
  4. French 323 or 324.
  5. Twenty (20) additional credits in French (5 four-credit courses) at the 300-400 level, three of which must be in literature.

Recommended: A second modern language or Latin; related courses in English, history, philosophy, and art.

Majors are strongly encouraged to spend their junior year in a French or Francophone university. Departmentally pre-approved courses taken there will normally be accepted as courses in the major.

Requirements for a Minor in French

A total of twenty (20) credits as follows:

  1. French 202*.
  2. French 301.
  3. French 323 or 324.
  4. Additional elective four-credit courses at the 300-400 level. French 202, 301, and 323 or 324 must be taken before elective courses above 324 are attempted.

Minors are strongly encouraged to spend at least one term of their junior year in a French or Francophone university. Departmentally pre-approved courses taken there, beyond French 324, will count as elective courses in the minor. French 305 counts as one elective course in the French minor.

*Students who place into the 300-level are neither required nor permitted to take French 202 for credit toward the major or minor. Students placed at the 300-level are still required to take a total of 40 credits for the major and 20 credits for the minor. Students who choose to take appropriate 300-400 level courses offered by the French section in English may count only one course taught in English toward the major or minor.

German

Honors in German

A minimum of 40 credits above German 201; a research paper on a specific literary, linguistic, or cultural topic; demonstrated proficiency in spoken and written German.

Requirements for a Major in German Studies

A total of nine courses (36 credits) above 201 as follows:

  1. German 301 and 302. Must be taken before any other 300-level course is attempted but may be taken concurrently with others. German 305 taken abroad may be substituted for one of these.
  2. German 320 and 321 (each must be taken in conjunction with one credit of 311.)
  3. Two of the following: German 340-348 (Students who wish to count these toward the German major will do portions of the work in German.)
  4. German 409 (topics vary.)
  5. German 202 may be applied to the major unless a student places into a higher level course in the curriculum.
  6. One of the following courses may be applied to the major: German 240-248. (Students who wish to count these toward the German major will do portions of the work in German.)
  7. German 486 (Senior Paper). Required for majors.

Majors are strongly encouraged to participate in the exchange program with the University of Tübingen, the University of Landau, or with a departmentally approved ISEP program during their junior years; equivalent courses from there will be accepted as substitutes.

Recommended: A second foreign language; related courses in English, international studies, philosophy, and history.

Requirements for a Minor in German Studies

A total of five courses (20 credits) above 201 as follows:

  1. German 301 and 302. Must be taken before any other 300-level course is attempted but may be taken concurrently with others. German 305 taken abroad may be substituted for one of these.
  2. At least one of the following: German 320-321 (each must be taken in conjunction with one credit of 311.)
  3. At least one course numbered 340 or higher.
  4. German 202 may be applied to the minor unless a student places into a higher level course in the curriculum.

Minors are also strongly encouraged to spend at least a semester at the University of Tübingen, the University of Landau, or with a departmentally approved ISEP program; equivalent courses from there will be accepted as substitutes.

Modern Languages and Literatures: Faculty and Staff

Professors

Michelle Mattson. 2004. B.A., University of Minnesota; M.A., Ph.D., Stanford University. (Twentieth-century German literature and culture, Gender and Sexuality Studies)

Associate Professors

Elizabeth Bridges. 2010. B.A. Hendrix College; M.A. University of Arkansas; Ph.D. Indiana University (Late-Eighteenth through Early Twentieth-century German Studies, Film Studies, Gender and Sexuality Studies.)
Kathleen Anne Doyle. 1999. B.A., Saint Xavier College, Chicago; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Chicago. (Spanish Language, Modernism in Spain, Contemporary Peninsular Spanish literature, Gender and Sexuality Studies.)
Han Li. 2008. B.A. Nanjing University; Ph.D. University of California, Irvine  (Literature and culture of Late Imperial China.)P.
Eric Henager. 1995. Chair. B.A., Rhodes College; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Illinois. (Spanish language, Contemporary Spanish-American literatures and cultures, popular culture and literature, Latin American Studies.)
Alexandra Kostina. 1996. M.A. Novgorod State University; Ph.D. Gornyi University/Russian State Pedagogical University (Russian Language, Linguistics, and Culture.)
Felix Kronenberg. 2009. M.A. University of Regensburg, Germany; Dr.phil. University of Regensburg, Germany (Language Acquisition and Technology, Stereotypes in Advertising, German Culture.)
Laura Loth. 2009. B.A. College of William and Mary; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Minnesota (Nineteenth- and Twentieth-century French Studies, Francophone Literatures, Gender and Sexuality Studies.)
Shira Malkin. 1990. Doctorat de Troisiéme Cycle, Université de Paris VII; Ph.D., State University of New York at Buffalo. (French language and literature, drama, intercultural education, and translation.)
Elizabeth Marcela Pettinaroli. 2007. B.A. Franklin and Marshall College; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Virginia (Early Modern Hispanic literature, Spanish American literature, Space and Place.)
Alberto del Pozo Martínez. 2008. Licenciado en Filologia, Universidad de Zaragoza. M.A. and Ph.D. Vanderbilt University (Modern Spanish American Literature and Literary Theory.)
Chia-rong Wu. 2011. B.A. National Kaohsiung Normal University; M.A. National Dong Hwa University; Ph.D. University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign (Modern Chinese Literature and Culture.)

Assistant Professors

Rachel Noël Bauer. 2008. B.A. Duquesne University; M.A. Purdue University; Ph.D. Vanderbilt University (Early Modern Spanish Literature, Golden Age Narrative, Don Quixote de la Mancha.)
Brandy Brown. 2013. B.A. Middle Tennessee State University; M.A. The Pennsylvania State University (Medieval and Early Modern French Literature, Medieval and Modern Arthuriana, Genre Studies, Print Culture Studies.)
Clara Pascual-Argente. 2011. B.A. and M.A. Universidad de Salamanca; Ph.D. Georgetown University (Medieval and Early Modern Spanish Literature, Film Studies.)
Catherine Sundt. 2012. B.A. Grand Valley State University; M.A. and Ph.D. The Ohio State University (Modern Spanish Literature and Urban Literature)

Instructors

Nora Jabbour. 2002. B.A. Universidad Rafael Landívar; M.A. Mississippi State University (Spanish Language and Hispanic Cultures). 

Staff

Christy Waldkirch 2005. Departmental Assistant.

Modern Languages and Literatures: General Courses

Modern Languages 150. Selected Foreign Languages.

Credits: Variable.

Certain foreign languages not listed above as regular course offerings are taught on occasion. Information concerning languages not regularly taught may be obtained from the Registrar or the department chair.

Modern Languages 240. Language Acquisition and Pedagogy.

Spring. Credits: 4

This course is a survey of a range of issues related to language acquisition and teaching. Among the areas covered are instructional methodologies and approaches, second language acquisition theories, language skill development, language teaching and learning technology, communicative and cultural competency, and assessment.

Rhodes offers a secondary licensure program within the Teaching and Learning track of the Educational Studies major. This program prepares students to teach middle and/or high school in one of eleven endorsement areas, including the following languages: Chinese, English, French, German, Latin, Russian, and Spanish. The course of study for secondary licensure students is designed with guidance from faculty members in the discipline in which the student is being certified as well as members of the Educational Studies Program. All secondary licensure candidates are required to double major in Educational Studies and their endorsement discipline.

Modern Languages 280. Introduction to General Linguistics.

Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F9.

The Introduction to General Linguistics course presents language as a specific object of knowledge, thought, science, and philosophy. Students will be introduced to the major linguistic theories and examine language as a system and structure at its various levels, as well as a tool to guide, plan, and monitor human activity. Offered in alternate years.

Modern Languages 460. Internship.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 1-4.

Degree Requirements: F11

Internships in the departmental languages are occasionally available for language majors and permit a qualified student to receive academic credit for an internship experience on or off campus, for example by working with a business, a non-profit organization, or within the department itself. The internship, which requires of the student an advanced competence in a foreign language, must entail a significant encounter with a foreign language. Working with a faculty mentor, students must submit a project proposal for the internship prior to the beginning of the internship itself. The completed project will be graded by the faculty mentor. Intradepartmental internships will be reserved for students planning to continue their studies in a foreign language and culture beyond the undergraduate level. Such internal internships will involve working with a faculty mentor on projects of a diverse nature that seek to enhance the program offerings of the language section. Placements must be approved by the faculty mentor who teaches the language in question and the chair of the department. Internship credit will not be awarded retroactively and does not count toward the total number of credits required for the major.
Pass/Fail only.

 

Russian

Programs Abroad

Rhodes College maintains a close relationship with the Gornyi Institute in St. Petersburg, where the Russian Studies Program’s Maymesters take place (see 209, 309, 256 descriptions). Through affiliation with Bard College, Rhodes students of Russian can study at the Smolny Institute of St. Petersburg for a semester or a year. In addition, students studying Russian can spend a summer, semester, or academic year in Russia through such nationally-recognized programs as the Council for International and Educational Exchange (CIEE) in St. Petersburg or the American Council on the Teaching of Russian (ACTR) in Moscow.

Requirements for a Major in Russian Studies

A total of forty (40) credits above Russian 201 as follows:

  1. Russian 202.
  2. Russian 205; and either 212 or Humanities 201. (Russian literature track)
  3. Two courses from Russian 301, 302, 309.
  4. Russian 410, 486.
  5. Russian 300 or 400.
  6. One course from Russian 215, 255, ML280.
  7. One course in Russian history approved by the program coordinator.

Recommended (do not count toward the 41 credits needed for the major): Economics 323 (Classical and Marxian Political Economy) and IS 284 (Russian Successor States.) Majors are encouraged to spend at least one semester studying in Russia.

Requirements for a Minor in Russian Studies

A total of twenty (20) credits as follows:

  1. Russian 301, 302, and 410.
  2. Two of the following: Russian 205, 212, 215, 255, 300, 400.

Minors are encouraged to spend at least one Maymester in Russia.

Russian: Offerings

101-102. Elementary Russian.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4-4.

Elementary grammar, reading, and conversation, supplemented by materials on Russian culture.

201-202. Intermediate Russian.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4-4.

Degree Requirement: F10 for 201.

Intermediate grammar and continued training in conversation and composition, supplemented by assignments in the Language Center. Reading of Russian texts of graded difficulty.

Prerequisites: Russian 101-102 or equivalent.

205. The Russian Mind.

Fall. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F4.

Study and analysis of the major intellectual currents of modern Russian history through literature, religious philosophy, and film. The study of these works is intended to identify some important attributes of the Russian national identity. Literary works will include those by Blok, Akhmatova, Soloukhin, Rasputin, and Petrushevskaya. Works of religious philosophy are by Soloviev, Florensky, Berdiaev, and Bulgakov. Films will include Dersu Uzala, The Barber of Siberia, and The Russian Ark.

209. Russian in Russia.

Summer. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F10 for 209, F11.

A 3-4 week guided encounter with the language and culture aimed at solidifying vocabulary and grammar previously acquired. A significant cultural component is part of the course. Takes place in May-June.

212. Masterpieces of Russian Literature in Translation.

Fall. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F4.

Reading of representative works by major Russian writers of the nineteenth century (including Pushkin, Pavlova, Gogol, Goncharov, Soboleva, Turgenev, Tolstoy, and Dostoevsky). The literary works include Eugene Onegin, supernatural tales by Gogol, Oblomov, The Cossacks, Notes from Underground, and Fathers and Children. These works will be studied for their individual merit, what they illuminate about nineteenth-century Russian society, and their contribution to the rise of the Russian novel. All works are read in translation.

215. Giants of Russia’s Silver Age: Soloviev, Blok, and Rachmaninoff.

Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5, F9.

Study of the aesthetic, thematic, and personal connections among three of Russia’s towering figures: Vladimir Soloviev, Alexander Blok, and Sergei Rachmaninoff. The course will examine in depth the creative works of the philosopher-poet Soloviev, the poet-dramatist Blok, and the composer-pianist Rachmaninoff (for whom poetry was second only to music). Master themes and global concepts linking the three creative artists include the yearning for harmony; exploration of Russian Orthodox religiosity; elevation of the –eternal feminineî of Sophia (the body of God); and connection between beauty and goodness. Representative philosophical, poetic, and musical works, respectively, of the three artists will be examined. Offered in alternate years. Scheduled for Spring, 2013.

Prerequisite: At least one course from the following departments or programs: Music, Philosophy, Religious Studies, or Russian Studies.

255. Catherine the Great and the Enlightenment: The Italian-Russian Connection.

Fall or Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5, F9.

In this course students investigate the Italian-Russian connections in three major areas of cultural production during the reign of Catherine the Great: music, literature, and architecture. Creative thinkers whose works will be studied include Bortnyansky, Paisiello, Casanova, Beccaria, Rastrelli, and Quarenghi. Students will learn features of the European and Russian Enlightenments, study the intricacies of Russian court culture, and explore the institution of patronage. The course aims to develop an understanding of cross-cultural fertilization and some major differences between Mediterranean and Slavic cultures. It is complemented by an optional, though highly recommended, three-week study trip to Italy and Russia (See Russian 256). Offered in alternate years. Scheduled for Fall, 2012.

256. Catherine the Great and the Italian-Russian Connection.

Summer. Credits: 0-1.

Degree Requirements: F11.

This Maymester program examines the musical, literary, and architectural connections between Italy and Russia during the reign of Catherine the Great. It takes participants to three cities: Rome, Milan, and St. Petersburg. In Rome students will attend lectures at LUMSA (university adjacent to the Vatican), attend a musical performance at the Teatro dell’Opera, visit places associated with Giacomo Casanova, and investigate architectural monuments by Italian architects whom Catherine attracted to Russia. In Milan participants will attend an opera at the Teatro all Scala and visit sites associated with Cesare Beccaria. In St. Petersburg students will attend performances in the Great Hall of the St. Petersburg Philharmonic and the Mariinsky Theatre, and will study major architectural ensembles. Takes place in May and June.

300. Dostoevsky.

Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F4.

This course explores selected works by Dostoevsky in the context of the rise of the Russian novel. The course will examine in depth several short works by the writer, as well as the novels The Idiot and The Brothers Karamazov. Concentration is on the major literary, philosophical, and religious issues Dostoevsky raises in his prose, as well as how these issues better enable us to understand the Russian mind. All works are read in translation.

301-302. Advanced Russian.

Fall ,Spring. Credits: 4-4.

Advanced grammar, with greater emphasis on the refinement of conversation and composition skills. Discussion of topics related to contemporary life in Russia.

Prerequisites: Russian 201-202 or equivalent.

309. Russian in Russia.

Summer. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F10 for 209, F11.

A 3-4 week guided encounter with the language and culture aimed at solidifying vocabulary and grammar previously acquired. A significant cultural component is part of the course. Takes place in May-June.

400. Russian Film: Film Theory.

Spring. Credits: 4.

Degree Requirements: F5.

Introduction to the ideological and aesthetic forces that have shaped the development of Soviet/Russian film, with particular attention to various film theories. Films of major directors, such as Eisenstein, Pudovkin, Tarkovsky, Kulidzhanov, and Sokurov will be studied. All films are subtitled; course is taught in English. (Cross-listed with English 382.) Offered in alternate years.

410. Analytical Reading.

Fall. Credits: 4.

This course aims to teach students the strategies of understanding texts of high literary quality by analyzing elements of given texts in their complexity. While focusing mainly on psycho-poetic aspects of reading activity, the course also introduces formal approaches to text analysis, such as identifying the stylistic devices and expressive means employed by the authors.

486. Senior Seminar.

Spring. Credits: 4.

Students will be assigned individual research topics associated with the essential concept of the Russian Idea, give weekly progress reports, which will involve analytical discussion, and present their results orally and in writing at the end of the course. Special attention will be given to assigned readings from the Russian press and from Russian literature.

495-496. Honors Tutorial.

Fall, Spring. Credits: 4-8, 4-8.

Spanish

Honors in Spanish

A minimum of 40 credits above Spanish 202, reading in a field of specialization and preparation of a paper in that field; examinations covering Spanish literature, Spanish American literature and civilization, Spanish grammar and Spanish civilization, and the field of specialization. Approval by the Department of Modern Languages and Literatures is required.

Requirements for a Major in Spanish

A total of thirty-six (36) credits above Spanish 202. At least five courses must be completed at or above the 310 level. Required courses are the following:

  1. Spanish 301 or 302. (the other may be taken as an elective)
  2. Spanish 303, 306, and 486.
  3. Five elective courses, at least four of which must be numbered 310 or above.

Requirements for a Minor in Spanish

A total of twenty (20) credits above Spanish 202. At least one course must be completed at or above the 310 level. Required courses are the following:

  1. Spanish 301 or 302. (the other may be taken as an elective)
  2. Spanish 303 or 306. (the other may be taken as an elective)
  3. Three elective courses, at least one of which must be numbered 310 or above.

The Language Learning Center

The Language Center is a support and resource space for language students and faculty. It offers a variety of technology, digital media, and non-digital resources. It offers professional development opportunities for Rhodes language faculty and curricular support, and functions as space for social interaction.

Music

Becoming a Major in Music:

Students intending to major in music are required to pass an audition on their principal instrument. This audition will take place during their semester jury/exam, which can be as early as their first semester of study, but is recommended to occur no later than mid-sophomore year. They must complete a Declaration of Major form which includes: an outline of their proposed course of study, an essay which details why they wish to major in music, and consultation with their academic advisor.
 

Sophomore-Year Review

Music majors are required to undergo a sophomore-year review. This review includes assessment of all previous juries (at least three semesters of study on their principal instrument), and an interview with full-time music faculty, which will take place in January of the student’s sophomore year. This review helps assess academic and artistic progress, and helps focus direction for the remainder of their undergraduate studies in music.

Honors in Music

  1. Fulfillment of the requirements for a major in music.
  2. Intensive work in at least one of the following areas: music history, music theory, performance, conducting, or composition.
  3. A substantial in-depth thesis or creative project in one or more of the areas studied.

Music Theory Placement

A music theory placement test is given by the department to determine a student’s skill level. Any student demonstrating the appropriate degree of proficiency may place into either Music 204 or a 300-level music theory elective (306-313). Students may, alternatively, fulfill this prerequisite by taking Music 103 before beginning the theory sequence. Music majors and minors who encounter a closed music course in the registration process should contact the instructor to be admitted.

Music: Faculty and Staff

Professor

William M. Skoog. 2009. Chair. B.A., Gustavus Adolphus College; M.A., University of Denver; D.A., University of Northern Colorado. (Director of Choral Activities, Conducting, Voice.)

Associate Professor

Carole Choate Blankenship. 1990. B.A., Rhodes College; M.M., D.M.A., University of Memphis. (Voice, Music Theory, Music Literature.)
Thomas E. Bryant. 1987. B.M., M.M., University of Georgia; D.M., Northwestern University. (Piano, Collaborative Piano, Music Literature.)
Courtenay L. Harter. 2000. B.F.A., Carnegie Mellon University; M.M., Northwestern University; Ph.D., University of Connecticut. (Music Theory, Music Cognition, Oboe/English Horn, Chamber Music.)
Vanessa L. Rogers. 2010. B.M.E., Illinois Wesleyan University; M.A., Ph.D., University of Southern California. (Music History, Music Literature, Search.)

Assistant Professors

John B. Bass, III. 2010. B.M., University of Southern Mississippi; M.M., Ph.D., University of Memphis. (Director of the Mike Curb Institute.)
Leah McGray. 2013. B.M., B.M.E., Acadia University; M.M., University of Toronto, Ph.D., Northwestern University. (Director of Instrumental Studies, Conducting, Chamber Music.)

Adjunct Instructors

Mike Assad. B.M., University of Kentucky; M.M., University of Memphis. (Percussion, World Drum Ensemble.)
Sara Chiego. B.M., University of Memphis; M.M., Cincinnati Conservatory of Music. Memphis Symphony Orchestra. (Double Bass.) 
Rena Feller. B.M., Oberlin College Conservatory of Music; M.M., The Juilliard School. Memphis Symphony Orchestra. (Clarinet.)
Sandra Franks. B.M., University of Mississippi; M.M., Louisiana State University; D.M.A., University of Mississippi. (Voice.)
Jane Gamble. B.A., Lambuth College; M.M., M.S.M., D.M.A., University of Memphis. (Collaborative pianist/organist.)
Brian Hodge. B.M.E., East Tennessee State University; M.M., University of Memphis; Ph.D in progress, University of Memphis. (Rhodes Wind Ensemble, Rhodes Orchestra.)
Sabrina Hu. B.M., Mannes College of Music; M.M., Royal Northern College of Music; D.M.A., Michigan State University. (Flute, Flute Ensemble.)
Marcus King. B.M.E., University of Memphis; M.M., University of Memphis. (Voice.)
Ellen B. Koziel. B.A., Radford University; M.M., University of Memphis; Ph.D. in progress, University of Memphis. (Rhodes Women's Chorus)
Mona B. Kreitner. B.M., Mansfield University; M.M., Eastman School of Music; Ph.D., University of Memphis. (Voice, Music History and Literature.)
Francisco Lara. B.M., Northwestern University, Evanston, Illinois, M.M., Ph.D., The Florida State University, Tallahassee. (Musicology, Ethnomusicology, Music Theory.)
David T. Lay. B.M., Lambuth University. (Guitar, Contemporary Commercial Music Ensemble.)
Michael Mackenzie. B.M.E., University of Memphis. (Trumpet.)
Paul Murray.  B.A., Rhodes College 01'; M.M., San Francisco Conservatory of Music. (Voice.)
Gina Neupert. B.M., Indiana University; M.M., University of Southern California. (Harp, Harp Ensemble.)
Brian Ray. B.M., University of Tennessee at Martin; M.M., University of Memphis; D.M.A., University of Memphis. (Piano, Department Collaborative Pianist.)
John Ross. B.M., Northern Illinois University; M.M., Illinois State University. (Guitar, Guitar Ensemble.)
Jane Gerard-Schranze. B.M., Eastman School of Music; M.M., New England Conservatory. (Viola, Violin, chamber music.)
David L. Shotsberger. B.M., M.M., The Pennsylvania State University; D.M.A., University of Memphis. (Music Technology, Composition.)
Debra H. Smith. B.M., Mississippi College; M.M., University of Memphis. (Piano, Organ, Music Literature and Theory.)
Gerald Stephens. B.F.A., Commercial Music/Recording Technology, University of Memphis. (Jazz Piano, Jazz Combo.)
Kate Stimson. B.A., Hollins College; M.M., University of Memphis. (Piano.)
Lester Robert Sunda, Jr. (Jazz Bass Guitar, Jazz Combo.)
Mark Vail. B.M., University of North Texas. Memphis Symphony Orchestra. (Trombone, Low Brass.)
Yukiko Whitehead. B.M., University of Tennessee; M.M., D.M.A., University of Memphis; Yamaha Music Foundation Suzuki Piano Teachers Certificate, Suzuki Association of America. (Piano.)
Carl R. Wolfe. U.S. Navy Chief Musician (ret.); U.S. Armed Forces School of Music. Memphis Jazz Orchestra. (Saxophone.)
Wen-Yih Yu. Diploma, National Academy of Arts, Taiwan; M.M., Mannes College of Music. Memphis Symphony Orchestra. (Violin, String Quartet.)
Iren Zombor. B.A., Franz Liszt Conservatory of Music, Hungary; M.A., University of Massachusetts-Amherst. Memphis Symphony Orchestra. (Cello, String Quartet.)

Staff

Erika Pope  Musical Arts Coordinator. B.A., Henderson State University.
Jacob Church Recording Technician. B.A., Rhodes College.
Dennis Holland Piano Technician.

Requirements for a Major in Music

A total of fifty-six 56 credits (10 courses; 16 performance credits = four 4-credit courses) as follows:

      1. Three Music Theory Courses (12 credits)
                 a.   MUSC 204 - Understanding Musicianship [F5]*      
                 b.   Two 300-level music theory courses
                       *If placement test determines this course is redundant, choose three 300-level music theory courses.

       2. Three Music History & Literature courses (12 credits)
                a.   MUSC 227 - European Musical Heritage I [F3]
                b.   MUSC 228 - European Musical Heritage II [F3]
                c.   One F9 (world Music) elective: MUSC 117, 118, 119, or selected 105 sections

       3. Two 4-credit Music electives (8 credits) 
                MUSC 101 does not fulfill this requirement.
                Courses from Music 160-199 do not fulfill this requirement.

       4. Performance (16 credits)
                a. 8 semesters of applied music lessons (MUSC 160-178 = 1 credit each)
                b. 8 semesters of large ensembles (MUSC 180-184, 190-194) = 1 credit each)

       5. Senior Experience (8 credits)
                Conducting (MUSC 414-415)
                Senior Seminar & Presentation (MUSC 485-486)

Once declared, Music majors will have the Applied Music fees waived for up to eight (8) credits of their principal applied instrument. Music majors taking more than eight (8) credits of Applied Music and lessons taken prior to declaration of the major will be charged the applied fee for those credits.

NOTE: Music Talent Award and Fine Arts Award recipients' conditions for waivers of Applied Music fees are outlined in their award letters, which supersedes music major and minor fee waivers as contained here.

 

Requirements for a Minor in Music

  1. One Music Theory course (4 credits): 
           a. MUSC 204 (Understanding Musicianship) or one 300-level music theory course, depending on placement.
     
  2. One of the Music History & Literature survey courses (4 credits)
           a. MUSC 227 - European Musical Heritage I [F3]
           b. MUSC 228 - European Musical Heritage II [F3]
     
  3. Performance (8 credits)
           a. 4 semesters of lessons (MUSC 160-178 = 1 credit each)
           b. 4 semesters of large ensembles (MUSC 180-184, 190-194 = 1 credit each)
     
  4. Two 4-credit Music electives (8 credits):
           a. Courses from MUSC 160-199 do not fulfill this requirement.
     

Once declared, Music minors will have the Applied Music fees waived for up to four (4) credits of their principal applied instrument. Music minors taking more than four (4) credits of Applied Music and lessons taken prior to declaration of the minor will be charged the applied fee for those credits.

NOTE: Music Talent Award and Fine Arts Award recipients' conditions for waivers of Applied Music fees are outlined in their award letters, which supersedes music major and minor fee waivers as contained here.

Philosophy

The Department of Philosophy helps students explore questions concerning the nature of reality, the role of values, obligations and choice in moral life, the sources of truth and meaning, and the power and limits of human reason and understanding. 

Honors in Philosophy

  1. Courses required: fulfillment of the requirements for a major in Philosophy.
  2. Honors course: Philosophy 399, 495-496.
  3. Examination: an oral examination on the honors essay and related field is required.
  4. Approval of the honors project by the Philosophy Department Honors Committee is required.

Philosophy: Faculty and Staff

Associate Professors

Patrick A. Shade. 1996. B.A. and M.A., Colorado State University; M.A. and Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. (Ethics; American philosophy; history of philosophy; logic; interdisciplinary humanities.)
Mark P. Newman. 2010. Chair. B.A., California State University, Sacramento; M.A., Ph.D., University of California, San Diego. (Philosophy of science; epistemology; metaphysics; philosophy of mind; philosophy of religion; logic.)

Assistant Professors

Rebecca Tuvel. 2014. B.A., McGill University; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. (Social-Political Philosophy; Animal and Environmental Ethics; Feminist Philosophy; 20th century French philosophy; social epistemology.)

Julia Haas. 2016. B.A., Concordia University; M.A. and Ph.D., Emory University. (Philosophy of Mind; Philosophy of Cognitive Science; Philosophy of Neuroscience.)

Staff

Stephanie Cage. Departmental Assistant.

Requirements for a Major in Philosophy

A total of forty-four (44) credits as follows:

  1. Philosophy 201, 203, 206, 220, 301, 486.
  2. Philosophy 318 or Philosophy 319.
  3. Four additional four-credit courses in Philosophy.

Requirements for a Minor in Philosophy

A total of twenty-four (24) credits as follows:

  1. Philosophy 201 or 203. (students are encouraged to take both)
  2. Philosophy 206 and 301.
  3. At least two additional four-credit courses in the 300’s or above.
  4. One additional four-credit course in Philosophy.

Physical Education

Physical Education classes are offered each semester for students who wish to take courses to fulfill degree requirements and for their own growth, development, and pleasure. Courses are taught for seven weeks (one-half of a semester), and all classes are open to both men and women. Courses offered during the first seven weeks of the semester are numbered in the 100s, and courses numbered in the 200s are offered during the second seven weeks of the semester.

Three half-semester courses of Physical Education are required for graduation under Foundation 12. These courses carry no academic credit and are graded on a pass-withdraw basis. For each successfully completed, full-semester course in one of the ROTC programs, a student will be credited with one course of the Physical Education degree requirement of three courses.

Physical Education courses for which proper registration is not made will not be credited to a student’s record retroactively. It is the student’s responsibility to be sure that he or she is properly registered for the course during the semester in which it is taken.

Physics

All prospective physics majors should consult with the Department Chairperson as early as possible. As noted, prospective physics majors should take in their first year Physics 111-112 and associated laboratory. Physics 101, 105, and 107 may not be used for credit towards a major or minor in physics, but they may be used for general degree credits.

Honors in Physics

  1. Courses required: those listed for the B.S. degree with a major in physics, plus Physics 495-496, Honors Tutorial.
  2. A research project in physics, usually involving a topic related to Physics Faculty research. The Honors Project must be approved by the Department of Physics and must follow the department and college guidelines and schedule for honors work. A creditable thesis must be presented to the Department at the end of the academic year.

Physics: Faculty and Staff

Professors

Brent K. Hoffmeister. 1996. B.A., Wabash College; Ph.D., Washington University. (Ultrasonics, medical physics.)

Associate Professors

Ann M. Viano. 1999. Chair. B.S., Santa Clara University; Ph.D., Washington University. (Materials science, solid-state physics, medical imaging.)
Shubho Banerjee. 2002. The Van Vleet Fellow in Physics. M.S., Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur; Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University. (Electrostatics, thermodynamics, theoretical physics.)
David S. N. Rupke. 2010. The J. Lester Crain Professor of Physics. B.S., Calvin College; Ph.D., University of Maryland. (Observational and extragalactic astronomy.)

Assistant Professors

Elizabeth J. Young. 2014. B.A., Smith College; B.E., Dartmouth College; Ph.D.; Princeton University. (Exoplanet imaging, astronomy instrumentation, optics.)

Technical Associate

Glen W. Davis. B.S., University of Memphis; M.S., Murray State University.

Instructional Support Specialist

Victor O. Obadina (Lanre). B.S., Fisk University; M.S., Alabama A&M University.

 

Requirements for a Major in Physics Leading to the B.S. Degree

A total of fifty-five (55) credits as follows:

  1. Physics 111-112 (or 109-110 with departmental approval), 113L-114L.
  2. Physics 211, 213.
  3. Physics 250.
  4. Physics 301, 305, 401, and 406.
  5. Physics 486.
  6. At least 4 additional Physics credits at the 300-level or above.
  7. Mathematics 121, 122, 251, and 223 or appropriate substitutes as approved by the Physics Department. It is recommended that these courses be taken in the first two years.

Students planning to pursue graduate study in physics are strongly encouraged to take as many upper elective physics courses as possible. Mathematics 261, 370 and Computer Science 141 also are recommended.

Students planning to pursue dual degree or graduate study in engineering should consult with Professor Elizabeth Young who serves as the pre-engineering advisor.

Physics majors are encouraged to consider study abroad opportunities, and should consult with their academic advisor about suitable options.

Requirements for a Minor in Physics

A total of twenty-four (24) credits as follows:

  1. Physics 111-112 (or 109-110 with departmental approval), 113L-114L.
  2. Physics 211. Note: Physics 213 is not required.
  3. At least one additional 4-credit Physics course at the 200-level or above.
  4. Mathematics 121, 122. Mathematics 223 is recommended, but not required. 
    Note: Mathematics 223 is a prerequisite for many upper level physics courses.

Political Science

The Department of Political Science prepares students to address fundamental questions of equality, liberty, and justice; the history of political philosophy; the constitutional structure of government in the U.S., and the major institutions of national politics, urban politics, and public policy. 

For Students Considering a Career in Law

Political Science is an especially good major for those interested in a career in law. The American Bar Association identifies a set of skills and bodies of knowledge that students considering a career in law should develop through their undergraduate education, and the Political Science major concentrates on all of these to a very high degree. These core skills and values include "analytic and problem-solving skills," "critical reading abilities," "writing skills," "oral communication and listening abilities," and "general research skills," among others.* The Political Science curriculum will involve you repeatedly in academic work that hones each of these, and covers areas of knowledge the ABA considers important preparation for law school: a comprehension of the contemporary American political and legal systems; political development of the United States; the fundamental principles of political thought; a basic understanding of human behavior and social interaction; and the ability to organize, manage, and analyze data in the process of conducting research. Law-related internships or co-curricular activities may also be appropriate.

*www.Americanbar.org/groups/legal_education/resources/pre_law

Honors in Political Science

Honors work in Political Science affords an opportunity for Political Science majors to investigate topics of their own choosing. In the process, they will be expanding and honing their research and writing skills, which is excellent preparation for graduate and professional degree work. Majors pursuing honors will devote a substantial portion of their last two semesters at Rhodes to their projects (honors work earns eight-twelve credits across two semesters). To be eligible, a student must have completed 28 credits of course work in the major and have a grade point average of 3.5 or higher in the college and in Political Science courses. Honors guidelines are available from the chairperson of the department.

Political Science: Faculty and Staff

Professors

Daniel E. Cullen. 1988. M.A., Dalhousie University; Ph.D., Boston College. (History of political philosophy; American political thought; contemporary political theory.)
Michael Nelson. 1991. Fulmer Professor of Political Science. B.A., College of William and Mary; M.A. and Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University. (American Presidency; Southern Politics; American politics.)
Marcus D. Pohlmann. 1986. B.A., Cornell College; M.A., M.Phil. and Ph.D., Columbia University. (American politics; legal studies; education policy, black political thought.)

Associate Professors

Amy E. Jasperson. 2012. Chair. B.A. Wellesley College; Ph.D., University of Minnesota. (American politics; political communication; political psychology; political campaigns.)
Stephen H. Wirls. 1994. B.A., Kenyon College; M.A. and Ph. D., Cornell University. (American politics; Congress; American political thought; modern political philosophy.)

Assistant Professors

Keith C. Gibson. 2014. B.A., Princeton University; Ph.D., University of Michigan (Urban politics, political participation and political behavior, research methodology and public policy)
Renee J. Johnson. 2013. B.A., Lawrence University; M.A. and Ph.D., Stony Brook University. (Political economy/public policy; methodology; American Politics.)

Post Doctoral Fellow in Political Science

Erin A. Dolgoy. 2013. M.A. and Ph.D., Michigan State University. (Political theory, science and technology studies, American politics.)

Director of Mock Trial

Anna R. Smith. 2012. B.A., Rhodes College; J.D. Duke University. (Legal studies; internships.)

Staff

Jacqueline Baker. 2010. Departmental Assistant.

Requirements for a Major in Political Science

A total of forty-eight (48) credits as follows:

  1. Political Science 151: U. S. Politics.
  2. Political Science 270: Research Methods.
  3. Political Science 485: Senior Seminar.
  4. One course of the following courses in political thought and philosophy: 212, 214, 216, 218, 230, 311, 314, Humanities 201 (Politics Track.)
  5. International Studies 110 or International Studies 120.
  6. Seven additional courses (28 credits) in Political Science, two of which must be at the 300 level. Political Science 460, Public Affairs Internship, may count as a major elective at the 200 level.

POLS 262, 263 and 264 do not count toward a major in Political Science.

Requirements for a Minor in Political Science

A total of five courses or twenty (20) credits as follows:

  1. Political Science 151: U. S. Politics.
  2. Two courses at the 200-level. Humanities 201 (Politics Track) may count for a 200 level course.
  3. Two courses at the 300-level or above.

POLS 460, Public Affairs Internship, does not count as a course for the minor in Political Science.

POLS 262, 263 and 264 do not count toward a minor in Political Science.

The Washington Semester and the Capitol Semester

Political Science students may participate in two different semester long programs in Washington, D.C., each involving courses, an internship, and a research project. Since special financial arrangements are required for these programs, students need to meet with the Director of the Buckman Center. These programs can be done in the Fall or the Spring semester. Two of the four courses transferred from the Washington Semester may satisfy requirements for a Political Science major, and all four of the courses transferred from the Capitol Semester may satisfy requirements for a Political Science major. Since some coursework transfers as internship credit, students receiving credit from either of these programs cannot count an additional Political Science 460 course toward the Political Science major.

Psychology

The Department of Psychology helps students develop an understanding of human behavior and experience a variety of theoretical perspectives. The faculty specialize in a wide variety of topics, including physiological, clinical, health, cognitive, social, developmental psychology, and education. 

Honors in Psychology

Members of the faculty of the Department of Psychology encourage students of exceptional academic accomplishment to pursue research with a departmental faculty sponsor that is of an in-depth, rigorous nature; this work will introduce the student to the quality of research one would normally experience in a graduate program. Because the level of involvement of the student and his or her faculty sponsor will be greater in Honors research than that in either a Tutorial or Directed Inquiry, the faculty of the Department of Psychology have established rules for student admission into the Departmental Honors Program. The policies are described on the department website. It is recommended that students interested in pursuing department honors enroll in Junior Seminar 399.

Major Essay

When declaring a major in psychology, students must submit an essay in which they articulate their educational goals. The essay should be four paragraphs, with one paragraph dedicated to each of the questions below (question 3 has two parts.)

  1. In your opinion, what are the defining characteristics of the discipline of Psychology?
  2. How do the requirements for the Psychology major complement your program of liberal arts study and support your career or life goals?
  3. As a Psychology major, how will you (a) build on your strengths and (b) address your weaknesses?

The entire essay should be between 250 and 1000 words and must accompany the Declaration of Major form when a student has the initial meeting with her/his major advisor. A student may choose to revise the essay after meeting with the advisor. Students will electronically submit the final, advisor approved, version of the essay as a Word document to the psychology departmental assistant so that it can be archived. The file name for the essay should be as follows: student’s last name, student’s first name, and graduation year. Each student will revisit the major essay in the senior seminar course.

Psychology: Faculty and Staff

Professors

Natalie K. Person. 1994. Chair. B.A., University of Mississippi; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Memphis. (Cognitive; learning technologies; educational psychology.)
Marsha D. Walton. 1979. B.A., M.A., and Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. (Developmental; narrative and social interaction.)

Associate Professors

Anita A. Davis. 1996. B.A., Rhodes College; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. (Clinical; community; interventions with minority populations; adolescent motherhood.)
Kimberly M. Gerecke. 2006. B.S., Muskingum College; M.S., University of Richmond. Ph.D. University of Alabama at Birmingham. (Neuroscience; exercise and neurodegeneration.)
Elizabeth Thomas. 2011. B.A., Georgetown University, Ph.D., University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign. (Urban Studies; community psychology; psychology and the arts.)
Christopher G. Wetzel. 1982. B.A., M.A., and Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. (Social; social cognition; prejudice.)
Matthew Weeks. 2015. B.A. Kentucky Wesleyan College; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Memphis. (Social; social cognition; stereotyping.)
Katherine White. 2009. B.A., Rhodes College; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Florida. (Cognitive and sensory processing; cognitive aging.)

Assistant Professors

Jonathan Cook. 2013. B.S., Andrews University; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Missouri. (Clinical; stigma and mental illness; media portrayal of mental illness.)
Erin Cue. 2016. B.S., Vanderbilt University; M.A. and Ph.D., University of California in Los Angeles. (Educational psychology; African-American achievement and motivation.)
Jason Haberman. 2014. B.A., University of Miami; M.A. and Ph.D., University of California - Davis. (Neuroscience: visual psychophysics; object recognition, ensemble perception.)
Jamie Jirout. 2014. B.A., Colgate University; Ph.D., Carnegie Mellon University. (Educational psychology: scientific curiosity and persistence; spatial processing.)
Rebecca Klatzkin. 2011. B.S., University of Richmond; M.A., and Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill. (Behavioral neuroscience: stress; eating behavior; binge eating disorder.)
Geoffrey Maddox. 2013. B.A., University of Missouri; M.A., and Ph.D., Washington University, St. Louis. (Cognitive: Aging and development.)
Ry Testa. 2015. B.A., Tufts University; M.A., and Ph.D., Temple University. (Clinical: Mental and medical health disparities in marginalized communities.)

Staff

Christy Waldkirch. Departmental Assistant.

Requirements for a Major in Psychology

A total of 11 courses or forty-four (44) credits in the major as follows: 

  1. Psychology 150 to be taken as early as possible in the student’s course of study.
  2. Psychology 200 and 211 should be taken as early as possible. Ideally they should be completed by the spring semester of the sophomore year.
  3. At least one course from each of the following four content domains (At least two of these courses must be core courses (underlined) from separate domains): 
    1. Developmental: Psychology 229, 230, 231; 
    2. Cognition and Learning: Psychology 306, 326, 327; Education 300 
    3. Biological: Psychology 216, 220, 270
    4. Sociocultural: Psychology 232, 250, 280, 323; Urban Studies 250. 
  4. One advanced methods course from among Psychology 350 – 352 that should be taken junior year. Before taking a particular advanced methods course, students should complete the core course that relates to it.
  5. One community-based or independent investigation course: Psychology 229 (some sections), 231, 250, 338, 451, 452, 460, 495, or 496; Education  360 or 460.
  6. One other course in psychology (only one 105 course may count). 
  7. Psychology 485 to be taken during the senior year.

 

Requirements for a Minor in Psychology

A total of 6 courses or twenty-four (24) credits as follows:

  1. Psychology 150.
  2. Psychology 200.
  3. Four additional psychology courses to be chosen in consultation with a departmental advisor and to be approved by the department chair. These will be selected to coordinate with the student’s major and career aspirations, and will normally include at least one 300- or 400-level course. Only one 105 course may count.

Religious Studies

The Department of Religious Studies promotes the academic study of religion by offering courses that explore the diverse aspects of religious traditions. Particular emphasis is given to the origins, history, and relevance of religion in contemporary life.

 

Honors in Religious Studies

Honors research in Religious Studies is established by consultation between the student and the department. In addition to the courses required for a major, the honors program requires the one-hour junior honors tutorial, Religious Studies 399, and the senior honors tutorials, Religious Studies 495-496, in which the student will be guided in the research and writing of an honors paper.

Religious Studies: Faculty and Staff

Professors

Stephen R. Haynes. 1989. The Albert Bruce Curry Professor of Religious Studies. B.A., Vanderbilt University; M.A., Florida State University; M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Emory University. (Holocaust studies; religion and politics; religion and literature; religion and education.)
Steven L. McKenzie. 1983. The Spence L. Wilson Senior Research Fellow. B.A., M.Div., Abilene Christian University; Th.D., Harvard University. (Old Testament; Hebrew.)
Milton C. Moreland. 2003. B.A., University of Memphis; M.A. and Ph.D., Claremont Graduate University (Archaeology; New Testament; Christian origins; historiography.)

Associate Professors

Thomas Bremer. 2001.The R. A. Webb Professor of Religious Studies. B.A., The Ohio State University; M.A., Ph.D., Princeton University. (History of religion in America.)
Patrick Gray. 2002. B.A., Oglethorpe University; M.T.S., Ph.D., Emory University. (New Testament; history of biblical interpretation; Greco-Roman moral philosophy.)
Kendra G. Hotz. 2006. B.A., University of Evansville; M.Div., Candler School of Theology, Emory University; Ph.D., Emory University. (Christian theology.)
Luther D. Ivory. 1997. B.A., University of Tennessee; M.S., University of Arkansas; D.Min., Union Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Emory University. (African-American religion and ethics; civil rights movement.)
John C. Kaltner. Chair. 1996. The Virginia Ballou McGehee Professor of Muslim-Christian Relations. B.A., State University of New York at Oswego; M.A., Maryknoll School of Theology; S.S.L., Pontifical Biblical Institute; Ph.D., Drew University. (Biblical studies; Islam.)
Bernadette McNary-Zak. 1999. B.A., University of Rochester; M.A., Catholic University of America; Ph.D., University of Toronto. (Early Christianity.)
Mark W. Muesse. 1988. B.A., Baylor University; M.T.S., A.M., and Ph.D., Harvard University. (Theology; world religions.)
Daniel Ullucci. 2011. W.J. Millard Professorship in Religious Studies B.S., Boston University; M.A., Ph.D. Brown University. (Early Christianity; ancient Mediterranean religion.)

Assistant Professors

Rhiannon Graybill. 2012. B.A., Swarthmore College; M.A., Ph.D., University of California, Berkeley. (Hebrew Bible; gender and sexuality.)

Visiting Assistant Professors

Sarah E. Rollens. 2015. B.A., University of North Carolina at Wilmington; M.A., University of Alberta; Ph.D., University of Toronto (New Testatment, Early Christianity)

Part-Time Faculty

Harry K. Danziger. B.A., University of Cincinnati; M.A. and Ordination, Hebrew Union College-Jewish Institute of Religion. (Judaism.) Supported in part by the Jewish Chautauqua Society.
R. Craig Jordan. B.A., Greensboro College; M.Div. and D. Min., Vanderbilt University; M.S., University of Memphis. (Pastoral care and counseling; bioethics; death and dying.) 
Yasir Kazi. B.Sc.University of Houston; B.A. and M.A., University of Saudi Arabia; M.A., M.Phil., Ph.D. Yale University. (Islamic studies.)

Staff

Stephanie Cage. Departmental Assistant.

Requirements for a Major in Religious Studies

A total of thirty-six (36) credits as follows:

  1. Religious Studies 255, 256; 251, 253 or 258.
  2. One 200-level course in Bible (260, 270-277, 280-286).
  3. One 200-level course in theology and ethics (211, 220, 232, 233). The Religion track of HUM 201 can count toward this requirement.
  4. Three 300-level courses. (Religious Studies 399, the Junior Honors Tutorial, does not count towards fulfilling this requirement.)
  5. Religious Studies 485 (Religious Studies 256 and at least one 300-level course must be completed prior to taking Religious Studies 485.)

Note: The Health Equity Internships (Religious Studies 460) may count toward fulfilling the third requirement for the Religious Studies major.

Requirements for a Minor in Religious Studies

A total of twenty (20) credits as follows:

  1. Religious Studies 101 and 102 or Humanities 101 and 102.
  2. Two 200-level courses in different areas of Religious Studies (biblical studies, theology and ethics, history of religions). Certain courses (e.g., Humanities 201 or GRS 250) can fulfill this requirement when cross-listed as Religious Studies courses.
  3. One 300-level Religious Studies seminar in any area.

Note: The Health Equity Internships (Religious Studies 460) may count toward fulfilling the second requirement for the Religious Studies minor.

Reserve Officer Training Programs

Rhodes, in cooperation with the University of Memphis and the Departments of the Army, Navy, and Air Force, participates in crosstown agreements that provide the opportunity for Rhodes students to enroll in Aerospace Studies (Air Force ROTC), Military Science (Army ROTC), and Naval Science (Navy ROTC) at The University of Memphis. Upon successful completion of the reserve officer training programs and the undergraduate degree at Rhodes, a student receives a commission as a second lieutenant in the appropriate military service.

The curriculum for the ROTC program is reviewed by the Faculty of Rhodes and the appropriate credits are assigned. The student who participates in the ROTC programs will have to complete all requirements as specified by the military service departments, including summer training camps, if the commission as an officer is to be granted.

A Rhodes student may earn a maximum of sixteen credits in the ROTC programs and apply fourteen of these credits to the 128 credits needed for a Rhodes degree. In addition, for each course completed in the ROTC program, the student will receive credit for one of the three half-semester courses in Physical Education that are required for graduation. Credit earned in ROTC is counted as elective credit, and it is listed on the student’s transcript as ROTC credit with the appropriate course titles. Credits enrolled in during a given semester are included in the count of credits for a normal course load. (The credit shown below applies to the 16-credit provision.) Although a student takes the ROTC courses at The University of Memphis, that student is a full-time student at Rhodes, and any financial assistance provided by the military services is based on tuition and fees at Rhodes.

Aerospace Studies

The Aerospace Studies program is in two parts. The first-year/sophomore-level program, the General Military Course, is open to all students. The junior/senior level program, the Professional Officer Course, is available only to selected, eligible students who desire to earn commissions as officers in the United States Air Force while pursuing their academic studies at Rhodes. Participants in the POC program and those in the GMC on AFROTC scholarships receive a monthly subsistence allowance from the Air Force. Graduate students who qualify are also eligible for POC enrollment.

Air Force ROTC scholarships which pay all or a portion of certain college costs (tuition, book allowance, and certain fees) are available on a competitive basis, to entering first-year students and to cadets participating in the AFROTC program. Details are available from the Office of Admissions and Financial Aid or from the Department of Aerospace Studies at the University of Memphis. Students wishing to participate should contact the Unit Admissions Officer, AFROTC Detachment 785, Department of Aerospace Studies, University of Memphis, at 678-2681. Students may also access AFROTC Detachment 785’s website at www.afrotc.memphis.edu and/or the AFROTC website at www.afrotc.com.

Rhodes Study Abroad Programs

European Studies

European Studies is a sixteen-week program offered jointly by Rhodes and The University of the South (Sewanee) that takes place from mid summer through early Fall. It is a full semester of study abroad and offers the unique experience of studying in a variety of locations in Europe in a special and quite different learning environment. The program begins in July with three weeks of study at The University of the South with Rhodes and Sewanee faculty. The students then travel to England where there is a seven day practicum of archaeology and field work conducted by British tutors at York and the University of Durham, followed by six weeks with British and European instructors at Lincoln College, Oxford. The program closes with five weeks of travel in Western Europe, accompanied by British tutors in Art History.
European Studies offers two academic options or “tracks.” The first track, “Ancient Greece and Rome: The Foundations of Western Civilization,” is a comprehensive study of the thinking and achievement of Ancient Greece and Rome and their importance to Western Civilization. The second track, “Western Europe in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance,” is an integrated cultural portrait of Western Europe in the Middle Ages and the Renaissance. They both provide a highly enjoyable experience of other cultures and other academic methods that enriches study back on the Rhodes campus. The experience culminates with extensive, student-authored academic journals that integrate what has been learned in the five weeks of study and travel.

Students in the European Studies program pay their tuition and fees to Rhodes and receive need-based financial aid as granted by Rhodes. Aid is limited to the amount that would be granted in support of a semester’s study at Rhodes. The credits are applied directly to degree requirements and are factored into the Rhodes grade point average.

This curriculum will be offered for the Fall 2014 European Studies program. A total of 18 credits is earned for the successful completion of this program. Courses are approved as meeting major, general or foundational degree requirements in the appropriate department or division as noted. Since courses are developed annually, some variation in topics may occur from year to year although the departments and general fields of study remain constant.

Theatre

LysistrataThe Department of Theatre offers courses that develop students’ analytic, performance, and production skills.  Students pursuing a major or a minor in theatre study theatre history, performance theory, acting, and design, and have opportunities to study directing, voice and movement, dramatic literature, and theatrical performance across cultures.

The McCoy Theatre, which opened in 1982, operates under the direction of the Department of Theatre.  The McCoy Theatre mounts formal productions and hosts several other performances each year, including staged readings, one-acts, and performances and workshops of guest artists.  Productions from past seasons include Nicholas Nickleby, J.B., and Dancing at Lughnasa. Productions also frequently include work originally conceived and developed at Rhodes. The McCoy Theatre regularly produces Shakespeare.  Recent Shakespeare productions include Hamlet, The Tempest, and Twelfth Night.  The McCoy Theatre occasionally produces musicals, which, in the past, have included Candide and Urinetown.

The Department of Theatre provides opportunities for all students to be involved with theatrical performances on campus.  The department's courses are open to the student body, and the McCoy Theatre's formal productions offer students in all disciplines opportunities to act, design, manage, and build.

Honors in Theatre

Detailed information about graduating with Honors in Theatre is available from the department. All Honors candidates must meet the College’s eligibility criteria established for the Honors Program. Only students with a minimum overall GPA of 3.5 and a GPA within the major of 3.7 by the end of the fall semester of their junior year will be eligible to pursue honors. In addition to fulfilling the requirements for the major, students seeking honors will be expected to complete the following additional work:

  1. The one-credit Honors Tutorial, Theatre 399, in spring of the junior year: in consultation with an appropriate member of the Theatre faculty, the Honors candidate must write a proposal for Honors work, positing a substantial Honors thesis or creative project that demonstrates an exceptional understanding of the area(s) studied, to be implemented in the senior year. The department must approve the proposal.
  2. The Senior Honors Tutorials, Theatre 495-496, in fall and spring of the senior year. An overall grade of A- on the thesis or project itself is required for Honors credit.

Requirements for a Major in Theatre

A total of forty-eight (48) credits as follows:

1. Theatre 100: Introduction to Theatre
2. Theatre 120: Acting I
3. Theatre 220: Production Technologies
4. Theatre 222: Scenic Design
5. Theatre 221: Acting II
6. Theatre 270: Performance Theory
7. Dramatic Literature Course
8. Theatre 301: Theatre Lab
9. Theatre 485: Senior Seminar
10. 4 Applied Credits
11. Two Theatre courses, at the 300+ level, from 2 of the following groups of courses:
• Directing-Performing
• History-Theory-Literature
• Design-Technology

 

Requirements for a Minor in Theatre

A total of twenty-four (24) credits as follows:

  1. Theatre 100
  2. Theatre 120 or 122
  3. Theatre 220
  4. Theatre 270
  5. Theatre 301
  6. 4 Applied Credits

Theatre: Faculty and Staff

Professors

Julia Ewing. 1976. Artistic Director, McCoy Theatre. B.A., Siena College; M.A., University of Memphis. (Acting; directing; stage movement.)
David Jilg. 1994. B.A., Rhodes College; M.F.A., Tulane University. (Production design; costume design; Spanish-American drama; gender studies.)

Associate Professors

Laura Canon. 1994. Distinguished Service Associate Professor. Technical Director and Production Manager, McCoy Theatre. B.A., Rhodes College; M.F.A., University of Memphis. (Lighting design; scene design.)
David Mason. 2004. Chair. B.A.; M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin, Madison. (Theatre history; theory; dramatic literature.)

Assistant Professors

Joy Brooke Fairfield. 2016. B.A., Harvard; M.A., New York University; Ph.D., Stanford. (Acting; directing.)

Part-Time Instructors

Bradley Harris. 2015. B.A., University of Calgary; M.F.A., University of Memphis; J.D., University of Calgary. (Public speaking.)

Managing Director, McCoy Theatre

Kevin Collier. 2006. B.A., Rhodes College.

The Educational Program

Academic Partnerships

There are some students who desire the benefit of an undergraduate education in the liberal arts and sciences prior to pursuing a more technical or specialized degree and career. Such students are able to take advantage of several dual degree programs arranged between Rhodes and other universities.

For those students who are interested in pursuing studies in engineering, Rhodes offers three Dual Degree Programs. Dual Bachelor’s degree programs are offered in cooperation with Washington University in St. Louis and Christian Brothers University (Memphis). Bachelors / Masters programs in Electrical Engineering and Biomedical Engineering are offered in cooperation with the University of Memphis. Students outside the science disciplines are also encouraged to combine those studies with engineering. The coordinator of these programs at Rhodes is Dr. Ann Viano. Students interested in pursuing a dual degree engineering program should meet with Dr. Viano as early as possible.

In addition to dual degree programs, Rhodes also provides opportunities for students to plan for post baccalaureate study within the medical sciences. These opportunities, through The George Washington School of Medicine and Vanderbilt University are coordinated by Dr. Alan Jaslow.

Dual Degree Programs

Bachelor of Science in Engineering

Washington University, St. Louis. This program can be a 3-2 or 4-2 plan of study, meaning a student may complete the Rhodes requirements for this Dual Degree Program in three years at an accelerated pace or in four years, and then apply to Washington University for admission to the undergraduate engineering program. The student receives two degrees, a Bachelor’s degree (a bachelor of science or bachelor of arts degree) from Rhodes and a Bachelor of Science in Engineering degree from Washington University at the completion of all years of study. The student who pursues a Rhodes major in the Humanities, Social Sciences, or Fine Arts will generally complete the Rhodes portion in four years, applying elective hours to the Dual Degree core requirements. Financial aid does not transfer from Rhodes to Washington University, but hte student can apply for aid from Washington University.

To satisfy the Rhodes graduation requirements and the entrance requirements to Washington University, all students in the Dual Degree Program must do the following:

  1. Satisfy all Rhodes foundations requirements as described earlier in this section of the catalog. Students should note that Washington University has specific requirements for the Humanities and Social Sciences. In particular, at least fifteen credits must be taken in Humanities and Social science, at least six in each division.
  2. Take the following core courses required for admission into the Washington University School of Engineering: Mathematics 121, 122, 223, 251; Chemistry 120, 125L; Physics 111, 113L, 112, 114L; Computer Science 141.
    • For biomedical engineering add the following core courses: Biology 130, 131L, 140, 141L, a 2nd semester of general chemistry with lab.
    • For chemical engineering add the following core courses: Biology 130, 131L, a 2nd semester of general chemistry with lab.
  3. Complete the additional major requirements to fulfill major requirements at Rhodes (if the chosen major is one listed below). If the Rhodes major is not one listed below, complete all major requirements listed in the catalog for the chosen major must be fulfilled, including senior seminar.
    • Chemistry Major/Chemical Engineering: Chemistry 211, 212, 212L, 240, 240L, 311, 312, 312L.
    • Physics Major/Biomedical Engineering: Physics 211, 250, 305, 304 or 307.
    • Physics Major/Electrical Engineering: Physics 211, 250, 301, 302, 304, 307 or 325, Biology 140, 141L.
    • Physics Major/Mechanical Engineering: Physics 211, 250, 304, 305, 307.
    • Computer Science Major/Computer Engineering: Computer Science 142, 241, plus one of CS 330, 335, 355 or 360; Mathematics 201, and either Mathematics 311 or 370.
    • Mathematics Major/System Science and Mathematics: Mathematics 201, 261, 311, 370, 465.
  4. Maintain a gpa (math/science and overall) of 3.25 at Rhodes for acceptance into the School of Engineering at Washington University.

Christian Brothers University, Memphis. This dual degree program is a 3-2 year plan of study. The student spends three years at Rhodes and completes all foundation requirements and the modified major requirements listed below for a major in physics, chemistry, or biochemistry/molecular biology, depending on the course of engineering to be pursued at Christian Brothers University. The student may also take select courses at Christian Brothers University during this time. The student applies to the engineering program at Christian Brothers University during the third year and becomes a full-time CBU student for two additional years. Both degrees, a Bachelor of Science from Rhodes and a Bachelor of Science in Engineering from CBU, are awarded at the completion of five years of study.

To satisfy the Rhodes graduation requirements and the entrance requirements to Christian Brothers University, all students in the Dual Degree Program must complete the following:

  1. All Rhodes foundation requirements with the following stipulations:
    • One of the F1 courses should be a philosophy course.
    • A minimum of 80 credits of the Rhodes BS portion must be fulfilled with Rhodes courses.
  2. The following pre-engineering core courses:
    • Physics 111/113L, 112/114L
    • Math 121, 122, 223, 251
    • Chemistry 120/120L 
  3. The following additional Rhodes courses depending on the Rhodes major and course of engineering study to be pursued at Christian Brothers University. Courses in parentheses are CBU courses that are suitable substitutes for the Rhodes courses and will satisfy the major requirements at Rhodes:
    • Physics Major/Mechanical Engineering: Physics 211, 250, 304 (or CBU ECE 221), 305 (or CBU ME 202), 306 (or CBU program option course), Computer Science 141 (or CBU ME 112)
    • Physics Major/Civil Engineering: Physics 211, 213L, 250, 304 (or CBU ECE 221), 305 (or CBU ME 202), 406 (or CBU ME 305), Computer Science 141 (or CBU CE 112)
    • Physics Major/Electrical Engineering – electrical engineering curriculum: Physics 211, 213L, 250, 406 (or CBU ME 305), one upper level physics elective at the 300 level or higher, Computer Science 141 (or CBU ECE 172)
    • Chemistry Major/Chemical Engineering- chemical engineering curriculum: Chemistry 211, 212, 212L, 240, 240L, 311, 312, 312L
    • Biochemistry Molecular Biology Major/Chemical Engineering- biochemical engineering curriculum: Biology 130, 131L, 140. 141L, 307, 325, 325L, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology 310, Chemistry 211, 212, 212L, 240, 240L, 414
  4. The following CBU courses should be taken during the first three years of the program through the Rhodes-CBU exchange program (the Crosstown agreement), depending on the Rhodes major and course of engineering study to be pursued at Christian Brothers University:
    • Physics Major/Mechanical Engineering: ME 121, ME 305
    • Physics Major/Civil Engineering: CE 105, MATH 308
    • Physics Major/Electrical Engineering - electrical engineering curriculum: ECE 221, ECE 222
    • Chemistry Major or Biochemistry & Molecular Biology Major / Chemical Engineering – either curriculum: CHE 231, CHE 232
  5. A minimum gpa of 2.5 at the time of application to Christian Brothers University is required. Only grades of “C” or higher will transfer to Christian Brothers University (“C-” and lower do not transfer).

Master of Science in Biomedical Engineering

This program serves students who are interested in completing a master’s degree in biomedical engineering (BME). Students who participate in this program complete both BS and MS degrees in five years. The typical student in this program takes three years of coursework at Rhodes, and then two years of coursework and research in the joint program in biomedical engineering at the University of Memphis / University of Tennessee. Students may receive a paying job in a laboratory once accepted into the program (typically after their sophomore year). All students become eligible for graduate assistantships after the completion of their Rhodes undergraduate coursework. The typical graduate assistantship includes a full tuition (for graduate courses)-and-fees scholarship and a monthly salary. Students can remain in graduate assistantship status throughout their fourth and fifth years.

Students can apply for this program once they have reached sophomore standing and have completed one semester of course work. Applications consist of an application form, one letter of reference and a copy of the student’s transcript. Each applicant will be required to complete an interview with a pre-graduate advisor. In order to remain in the program past the junior year, students must maintain a GPA of at least 3.25.

The course descriptions and details for each course may be found at the University of Memphis, the University of Tennessee, and the Rhodes College web sites.

The following requirements must be met to earn the two degrees:

  1. Complete all Foundation requirements for the Rhodes degree
  2. Complete the following core courses: Mathematics 121, 122, 223, 251; Computer Science 141; Chemistry 120, 120L; Physics 111, 113L, 112, 114L
  3. Complete the following requirements for the specific major chosen at Rhodes
    1. For the Chemistry major: Chemistry 211, 212, 212L, 240, 240L, 311, 312, 312L; Physics 304*, 305*.
    2. For the Physics major: Physics 211, 213L, two approved courses at the 300-level or higher*, a second semester of general chemistry from an institution offering a year-long introductory chemistry sequence 
  4. Complete the following additional undergraduate requirements at the University of Memphis:
    1. Biomechanical Engineering 2810 (Introduction to Biomechanics / Mechanics of Materials)
    2. Mechanics 3331 (Mechanics of Fluids)
    3. *If Physics 304 has not been taken, then add EECE 2201 (Circuit Analysis I). If Physics 305 has not been taken, then add Mechanics 2332 (Dynamics). These courses will be transferred to Rhodes. Additional undergraduate credits in mathematics, science, or engineering may be transferred to meet requirement 5 below.
  5. Complete the number of credits required for the Rhodes bachelor’s degree (from the first three years at Rhodes plus undergraduate courses transferred from UM). Successful completion of requirements 1-5 is necessary to fulfill the requirements for the B.S. degree.
  6. Complete the following graduate courses at the University of Memphis and/or The University of Tennessee:
    1. BIOM 7209 (Measurements and Instrumentation)
    2. BIOM 7101 (Biomedcal Engineering Analysis I)
    3. BIOM 7004, 7005 (Life Science I, II)
    4. BIOM 7996, minimum 6 credits (MS Thesis)
    5. One additional graduate mathematics elective course and three additional graduate engineering elective courses. These elective courses are selected in consultation with the graduate advisor.
    6. Enrollment in the BME seminar/professional development course(s) is also required.
    7. Students are expected to complete an oral thesis defense.

Master of Science in Electrical Engineering

This program serves students who are interested in completing a Bachelor’s degree with a major in physics from Rhodes and a Master of Science degree in electrical engineering from the University of Memphis. Students who participate in this program receive both degrees after five years. The typical student in this program takes three years of coursework at Rhodes, followed by two years of coursework and research at the University of Memphis. All students become eligible for graduate assistantships after the completion of their undergraduate coursework. The typical graduate assistantship includes a full tuition-and-fees scholarship and a monthly salary.

Students can apply for this program once they have reached sophomore standing and have completed one semester of course work beyond the first year. In order to remain in the program past the junior year, students must maintain a GPA of at least 3.25.

The following requirements must be met to earn the two degrees:

  1. Complete all Rhodes Foundation requirements for the bachelor’s degree.
  2. Complete the following Rhodes courses: Mathematics 121, 122, 223, 251; Computer Science 141; Physics 111, 113L, 112, 114L, Physics 250, Physics 304 (or equivalent)
  3. Complete the following additional Rhodes courses (or equivalents) to complete the physics major at Rhodes: Physics 211, 213L, 301, 302
  4. Complete 128 credits of undergraduate coursework from Rhodes, the University of Memphis, and any other institutions.
  5. Complete the following graduate courses for the planned electrical engineering option:
    • Memphis Signals and Systems Option
      • An additional 18 graduate credits
      • 6 credits of EECE 7996 (Thesis)
      • EECE 7251 (Random Signals and Noise)
      • EECE 6235 (Probabilistic Systems Analysis)
      • EECE 3211 (Electronics I)
      • EECE 3204 (Signals and Systems II)
      • EECE 3203 (Signals and Systems I)
    • Memphis Power Option
      • EECE 3201 (Circuit Analysis II)
      • EECE 3203 (Signals and Systems I)
      • EECE 4201 (Energy Conversion)
      • EECE 6235 (Probabilistic Systems Analysis)
      • EECE 7251 (Random Signals and Noise)
      • 6 credits of EECE 7996 (Thesis)
      • An additional 15 graduate credits
  6. The following courses or their equivalents are suggested as prerequisites to the University of Memphis portion of the program: EECE 2222 (Digital Circuits), EECE 2201 (Circuit Analysis I)

Second Degree Programs

George Washington School of Medicine Early Assurance Program

Qualified sophomores can apply for a commitment for acceptance to the George Washington School of Medicine following their graduation from Rhodes. This program allows students to use all four years at Rhodes to take prerequisite courses that would normally need to be completed in the first three years of college if going straight to medical school. In addition, qualified students are able to enroll in George Washington Medical School without taking the Medical College Admissions Test (MCAT). This agreement allows a student to more easily study abroad or take part in special semester programs and projects while working towards a career in medicine. The contact person for this program is Dr. Charles Snyder.

University of Tennessee Health Science Center BSN and Doctor of Nursing Practice Admission Agreement

Rhodes Students are eligible for guaranteed admission to the University of Tennessee Health Science Center College of Nursing to pursue training as a Registered Nurse and a Nurse Practitioner. Students also have the option of completing a PhD in nursing. This guaranteed admission pathway includes an accelerated 12 month BSN followed by training for certification and licensure as a Family Nurse Practitioner or one of several other advanced nursing specialties. The contact person for this program is Dr. Charles Snyder.  

Vanderbilt University Master of Science in Nursing Prerequisite Agreement

The Vanderbilt School of Nursing, in agreement with Rhodes College, allows for all but one of their program’s prerequisite courses to be completed with Rhodes course work. An additional online nutrition course is needed. The Vanderbilt School of Nursing offers an accelerated path to master’s level advanced practice nursing, i.e. to become a nurse practitioner or midwife. The contact person for this path is Dr. Charles Snyder.

Georgetown University Master of Arts in Latin American Studies

Rhodes students are eligible to apply for a Five-Year Cooperative Degree Program offered by Georgetown University’s Center for Latin American Studies (CLAS). The program allows undergraduates with a demonstrated commitment to Latin American Studies the opportunity to earn a Bachelor’s degree and a Master of Arts in Latin American Studies in five years. Dr. Amy Risley is the contact person for information on this opportunity.

Academic Regulations

The Board of Trustees vests responsibility for curriculum, instruction, and the regulation of academic affairs with the President and the Faculty. They in turn allocate this responsibility and implement it through various committees and individuals.

Three committees are chiefly responsible for regulating the academic program. The Educational Program Committee, which includes students in its membership, is responsible for the overall academic program, including requirements for the degree and departmental offerings. The Foundations Curriculum Committee, which also includes students in its membership, is responsible for the overseeing coursework that satisfies Foundations requirements. The Standards and Standing Committee has broad responsibility, subject to faculty review, to frame and implement procedures to insure that the instructional standards and aims of the College are met.

The regulations that follow are not comprehensive but are included here for the sake of easy reference by faculty and students. Any variation from academic regulations requires the formal approval of the Faculty. Students submit requests for variations from academic regulations to the appropriate faculty committees that make recommendations to the faculty. Requests for reconsideration of faculty decisions in light of new evidence will be considered by the committees making the initial recommendations.

Registration and Course Load

All students are required to register for classes during the Pre-Registration/Registration processes held prior to the first day of classes each semester. No late registrations will be accepted after the end of the Drop/Add period in any semester or summer term.

Fall or Spring Semester Registration and Course Load

Qualification as a full-time, degree student requires registration for a minimum of twelve (12) credits in a semester. A normal course load for a full-time student is 16 credits. Registration for fewer than 12 or more than 19 credits by a full-time student must be approved in advance by the Standards and Standing Committee. Students must be aware that in order to earn the total credits for a degree, sixteen credits in each of the eight semesters is needed. Less than 16 credits in any one semester must be matched by more than 16 credits in another semester or by summer session credits.

Degree-seeking students who register for eleven (11) credits or less in any one semester are classified as part-time students. It should be noted that students living in the residence hall must pay the full comprehensive tuition, regardless of the number of credits taken in the semester. Part-time students are not eligible to live in the residence halls; however, pending the availability of rooms and approval by the Dean of Students, part-time students may be allowed residence in College residence halls. Part-time status also affects eligibility for financial aid and intercollegiate athletics.  Computation of the total credits permitted per semester includes directed inquiries and concurrent enrollment at other consortium institutions. Direct registration at another institution may not be counted toward the full-time enrollment status.

First-year students may take up to four 4-credit courses and up to three additional credits each semester of their first year. A year’s residence with satisfactory grades is the usual prerequisite for taking more than the maximum number of courses.

Degree students may obtain permission to audit no more than one course per semester, without payment of fee, by agreement with the professor concerned. Audited courses are not included in the number of credits carried, nor are they recorded on the permanent record. Special, non-degree students (those students not seeking a degree) may enroll in more than eight (8) credits only with the permission of the Dean of Admission.

Summer Term Registration and Course Load

Students may register in 4 credits in each 5 week session of summer term.  Registration in more than 4 credits in a 5 week session requires approval by the Registrar.  Students may carry no more than 12 credits in a summer term.

Foundation Courses

Only certain courses in the Rhodes curriculum and in each department are approved to meet Foundation requirements. Each of these courses is designated in the course description in this catalog and on the class schedule for each semester online. It is the student’s responsibility to be aware of what courses in which they may be enrolled satisfy foundation requirements. Such courses are submitted by faculty members to the Foundations Curriculum Committee for approval. It is not possible for students to request foundation credit approval by the Committee for any coursework with the exception of Foundation 11. Self-initiated requests for F11 credit for certain coursework or experiences may be requested using the appropriate form available online.

Course Prerequisites and Co-requisites

Course prerequisites and co-requisites are requirements for entry into a course that state the background, experience, or related coursework that is needed for success in that course and to establish a relative order in which certain courses need to be taken. These requirements are set by the department based on experience and judgment. Students are responsible for knowing the prerequisites or co-requisites of any courses for which they register. Students who register for courses for which they do not meet such prerequisites may be asked to drop those courses from their schedules.

A prerequisite is a requirement that must be met in advance of taking the course. If the prerequisite is stated as a course by number, then that course must have been completed satisfactorily at Rhodes or accepted by Rhodes as transfer credit from another institution before the student can enroll in the desired course.

A co-requisite is a requirement that must be met at the same time as the course is being taken if that requirement has not already been met. If the co-requisite is stated as a numbered course, then that co-requisite course must be taken at the same time or credit for the co-requisite course must have already been earned.

A linked co-requisite is a course requirement that must be taken at the same time as the course to which it is linked. In most cases, the linked co-requisite courses will be a three-credit lecture course and a one-credit laboratory. Enrollment in one linked co-requisite course is permitted if the course has been failed previously, or is eligible to be repeated due to a final grade. If enrollment in one linked co-requisite is discontinued either by dropping or withdrawing, a student may not continue enrollment in the other linked course. Successful completion of both linked courses is required in order for a foundation requirement to be met.

In some cases a prerequisite may not be stated in terms of a numbered course. For example, a prerequisite may be “a designated course or permission of instructor” or “Permission of the department.” In some cases, a prerequisite may require a specific class standing, e.g. “Junior or Senior class standing” or “First-year students only.” These conditions express flexible arrangements that a department may use to manage course prerequisites. “Permission of the instructor” is the most flexible and requires that the student receive the approval of the instructor before enrolling in that course. A student who does not meet a specific course-numbered prerequisite for a desired course must get permission of the department prior to enrolling in that course. Students not meeting a specific class standing requirement may be asked to drop the courses from their schedules.

Class Standing

Under the foundations curriculum, a minimum of 30 credits are required for admission to the Sophomore class, 63 credits for admission to the Junior class, and 96 credits for admission to the Senior class. It should be noted that a minimum of 32 credits must be earned per year in order to accumulate the 128 credits needed for graduation in four years.

Class Attendance

Rhodes, as a residential college of the liberal arts and sciences, considers interactive engagement with other students and the professor, in a structured setting, to be one of the essential and central components of the academic program. Students enrolled at the institution make a commitment to participate fully in their education, which includes attending class. Absenteeism is not to be taken lightly.

Any student who fails to attend the first day of a class without providing prior notice of his or her absence to the instructor of the course or the chairperson of the department may be asked to drop the course upon request of the instructor. The student is responsible for dropping the class officially upon notification that such action has been taken.

Specific attendance policies are set by individual instructors, who state them in the course syllabus and during the first class session. Faculty should be mindful in setting attendance policies that college-sanctioned activities may require participating students to be off campus and consequently miss class. Faculty are discouraged from penalizing students solely for such absence and should normally, at their discretion, accommodate such a student (e.g., an alternate date for a test.) However, it is the student’s responsibility in undertaking college-sanctioned activities (e.g., varsity athletics, internships, and off-campus competitions connected with courses) to understand that their participation may come at the cost of absences from other courses or even forfeiting credit on certain assignments when making them up is not feasible. If, in accordance with the course policies, the instructor determines that excessive absences are jeopardizing a student’s ability to obtain a passing grade in the course, the instructor may make written request to the Dean of the Faculty that the student be removed from the course with a grade of F. If a student is removed from two or more courses in the same semester for this reason, the student may be asked to withdraw from the College.

Mandatory attendance at events outside of the regularly scheduled class period (e.g., lectures, seminars, concerts) will normally be included in the syllabus at the start of the semester, and will usually include some scheduling flexibility so that students may make informed decisions regarding their co-curricular educational and employment commitments. If exams or additional class sessions are scheduled outside of the regular class period, faculty members will give alternative times so that students may honor out-of-class educational and employment commitments if possible.

Class Preparation

A student is expected to spend a minimum of forty-six hours of academic study for every enrolled credit. This principle applies to tutorial and directed inquiry study as well as to regular course work during the academic year. Time spent on a per assignment basis will vary depending on the nature of the class assignments; however, on an average, a minimum of ten hours per week outside of class is expected for active preparation for a four credit course.

Schedule Changes

During the first week of classes in each semester, or the first two days during a 5-week summer session, courses may be added (based on seat availability) and/or dropped from a student’s schedule. Students may drop full semester classes until the end of the third week of a fall or spring semester, or the 5th day of class in a 5 week summer term session. The drop/add period for those courses that run during one of the 7 week sessions within the semester will be during the 1st week of that session only. No extended drop period exists for these partial semester courses. Approval of a course underload must be obtained if the resulting course load is less than 12 credits. No credit will be awarded retroactively for courses for which a student failed to register properly, including physical education.

Any student who fails to attend the first day of class without providing prior notice of his or her absence to the instructor of the course or the chairperson of the department may be removed from the course upon notification of the instructor to the Registrar. The student is then responsible for then dropping the course.

Withdrawal From Class

Students withdrawing from a course between the beginning of the fourth week and the end of the ninth week of a semester will receive either a grade of WP (withdrew passing) or WF (withdrew failing). Students withdrawing from a course between the 6th day and the 14th day of a 5-week summer session will receive either a grade of WP or WF.  Neither grade is computed in the student’s grade point average.

Withdrawal from a course is not official until the appropriate form with all required approvals is submitted by the student to the Registrar’s Office. A request to withdraw from a class which does not receive the approval of the instructor and the faculty advisor may be appealed to the Standards and Standing Committee.

The request to withdraw from a class after the stated deadline requires the approval of the Standards and Standing Committee in addition to the approvals of the instructor and the student’s faculty adviser. Students are expected to continue to attend classes until there is official notice that the request for withdrawal from class has been approved. No request for withdrawal from a class will be considered after the last day of classes.

Unauthorized withdrawal from any class constitutes a failure in the course. A student who withdraws from all courses in a semester is considered to be withdrawn from the college and must follow the appropriate procedure described below.

No student will be permitted to withdraw from a course in which he or she is under investigation for violating the Honor Code until the alleged violation has been adjudicated. A student may not withdraw from a course in which he or she has been found “In Violation” of the Honor Code.

Interruption of Participation in the College

It is not uncommon for some students faced with family circumstances, health or other problems, or academic difficulty to consider interrupting participation in the College for a semester or longer. Students who find themselves in such situations are encouraged to confer with their academic advisers, the College Counseling Office, or Student Development and Academic Services to discuss the variety of options available and the implications, advantages, and disadvantages of these options (personal, academic, and financial.)

Leave of Absence

Application for and the granting of a Leave of Absence indicates a continuing relationship between the student and the College. Students may decide to apply for a Leave of Absence for a wide variety of reasons and the terms of the Leave of Absence granted are designed to reflect the individual’s needs and circumstances. These terms range from the resumption of studies at the time specified without further approval by College authorities to the requirement that the student satisfy the College that conditions are now such that the individual is likely to succeed and prosper on return.

A Leave of Absence is granted only for one or two full semesters, and a student must make the request for a Leave of Absence in writing in advance to the Faculty Standards and Standing Committee. Students should obtain the necessary information and forms from Student Development and Academic Services. Students who are granted a Leave of Absence must also contact Student Development and Academic Services in order to initiate the normal process of leaving campus.

A Leave of Absence is not normally granted for periods in excess of one year. A Leave of Absence is not given for the purpose of studying at another institution nor can it be given to students who are not in good academic standing. If circumstances warrant, a student may be approved to enroll in up to two courses at another institution while on leave. Students on Leave must return to the College at the specified time or be deemed to have withdrawn from the College necessitating application for readmission.

Withdrawal From the College

In some instances a student may decide not to apply for a Leave of Absence but to withdraw from the College. Students who decide to withdraw from the College, either during or at the end of a semester, must contact Student Development and Academic Services in order to initiate the withdrawal process. A letter of withdrawal must be filed with Student Development and Academic Services and the entire withdrawal process completed before the student can be officially withdrawn from the College.

Students who decide to return to the College after having withdrawn must apply for readmission. If a student withdraws from the College during or at the end of a semester, it is expected that readmission, if approved, will not take place until one full academic semester has lapsed. Applications for readmission are available from Rhodes Express. (See also “Voluntary Withdrawal and Removal From Campus” in the Campus Regulations and “Readmission of Students” in the Admissions section of this catalogue.)

Examinations

The Honor Code represents what the students, the faculty, and the administration believe to be the best environment for the pursuit of the College’s educational aims. All tests and examinations are conducted under the Honor Code, and students are asked to indicate on their tests and final examinations that they have abided by the principles contained in the Honor Code.

Normally every course for which credit is given has a final examination as a component. Final examinations are intended to assess students’ mastery of the subject matter of the course and are normally comprehensive in scope. In some courses the purposes of a final examination are best served by special testing: take-home examinations, departmentally administered oral examinations, special projects and assignments, for example. Whatever the testing method, the important factor is that students are asked to synthesize major concepts, approaches, and facts from the course, and to demonstrate that they can do this on their own.

Final examinations are given during the examination week according to the published schedule. A student with three examinations in a row (not to include reading days) may petition the Dean of the Faculty to re-schedule no more than two examinations for later times in the examination period. Other changes because of extenuating circumstances (e.g. illness) must also be approved by the professor and the Dean. A professor may offer optional exam times for an entire class within the examination period, except for a Reading Day. Each member of the class must choose one of the optional times at least one week before the first day of examinations. The feasibility of implementing this option is left to the professor’s discretion. If exams are scheduled outside of the regular class period, students should be given alternative times which accommodate their other commitments.

A student who has a failing average on course work may be counseled before the final examination about the status of that work and about the role the final examination will play in determining the final grade, but the student is not excluded from taking the final examination. A student who has a passing average on course work but fails the final examination, and as a result has a failing average for the course, may be permitted to take a re-examination at the discretion of the instructor. The conditional grade of E (reexamination) is given in this case. The reexamination must be taken no later than the end of the second week of classes of the following semester.

A student who has a passing average on course work and who fails the final examination, but who earns a passing final grade, may be given the appropriate letter grade for the course.

Unexcused absence from a final examination automatically results in failure in the course. A student who is prevented by illness or other reason from taking the final examination at the scheduled time must present a written excuse or doctor’s certificate and will be given a conditional grade of X (incomplete). In some courses, due to the lesser weight given to the final examination in determining the final grade for the course, a professor may not wish to give the grade of F for an unexcused absence or the grade of X in the event of an excused absence. The professor’s policy on this matter is made clear at the beginning of the course so that there is no misunderstanding and so that it is clear that this situation is an exception to the general college policy. Consult the section on Conditional Grades for policies governing E and X grades.

Conditional Grades: Reexaminations and Incompletes

A student with a grade of E (see Examinations) must notify the Registrar at least one week in advance of the scheduled time that the reexamination will be attempted. If the student passes the reexamination, a grade of D-, D, or D+ will be earned, unless the course was taken Pass/Fail, in which case the grade of P will be recorded. Seniors in the final semester of attendance may be eligible for reexamination without delay, at the discretion of the professor, if they fail a final examination and are given an E grade.

The grade of X (incomplete) will be given to the student who is unable to complete course work, including the final examination, because of illness or other emergency. The appropriate form for the submission of the X grade must be submitted to the Registrar by the student and the professor by the deadline for the submission of final grades. Upon completion of the unfinished work and assignment of a grade by the professor, the student will receive a final grade.

All unfinished work must be completed and all final grades must be submitted by the professor to the Registrar no later than the end of the fourth week of classes of the following semester. A student on an approved Leave of Absence or off-campus study program will have until the fourth week of the student’s next semester in attendance to have the grade submitted to the Registrar. If illness or other extraordinary circumstances prevent this deadline from being met, then a petition requesting an extension must be submitted to and approved by the Standards and Standing Committee. Conditional grades not removed by the deadline will automatically become grades of F.

Grades and Grade Points

In official recording of academic work, the following symbols are employed: A, excellent; B, good; C, satisfactory; D, passing; P, pass; E, re-examination; X, incomplete; IP, course in progress; F, failure; WP, withdrew passing; WF, withdrew failing; NG, grade not submitted by professor. E and X grades are conditional and may be removed. The grades of B, C, and D are employed with plus and minus notations. The grade of A is employed with the minus notation.

Grade points are used to determine a student’s grade point average. The number of grade points awarded per credit hour for each grade is as follows:

Grade Grade Pts Grade Grade Pts
A 4.0 C 2.0
A- 3.7 C- 1.7
B+ 3.3 D+ 1.3
B 3.0 D 1.0
B- 2.7 D- .07
C+ 2.3 F 0.0

The total number of grade points earned for all courses are divided by the number of credits attempted in order to calculate the grade point average. Credits with a grade of Pass are not included in the determination of the grade point average although those credits with a grade of Fail are included. The grades of WP and WF are not computed in the grade point average. Conditional grades earn no quality points and no credits until they are removed. Credit and grade points earned by students who return for additional course work after receiving a degree are not computed with the final degree grade point average. Instead, a new grade point average is computed for all work attempted after receiving a degree.

The major grade point average is computed using the same formula as above. In computing the grade point average in the major department, all courses taken in the major department, not just those courses required for the major, and any required cognate courses in other departments are used.

Pass-Fail

A student may enroll in a class on a pass-fail basis with the permission of the instructor. No more than one course per semester with a maximum of six courses total is permitted. Courses that are graded pass-fail only do not count against that limitation. The Pass/Fail option may not be used in courses taken to satisfy foundation requirements with the exception of F11 and may not be used for courses taken to satisfy major or minor requirements including cognate courses.

The student wishing to take a course on a pass-fail basis must determine from the instructor the letter grade equivalent and the requirements for a grade of Pass. The pass-fail form with the instructor’s signature must be returned to Rhodes Express during the first three weeks of class in a semester.

Courses with grades of Pass count neither for nor against a student in the computation of grade point averages, but a failing grade is computed in the grade point averages.

Grade Reports

Reports of student’s grades are available online on the Rhodes website at mid-semester and at the end of each semester. Students are responsible for keeping other family members correctly and currently informed of their academic standing and progress.

Honor Roll and Dean’s List

An Honor Roll and a Dean’s List are compiled at the end of each semester. To be considered for Honor Roll or Dean’s List, a student must be enrolled in at least 16 credits of academic work. To qualify for the Honor Roll, a student must achieve a semester grade point average of 3.85 or better. To qualify for the Dean’s List, a student must achieve a semester grade point average of 3.70 or better. Those students who choose to take a course under the Pass/Fail option must have a minimum of 12 (twelve) additional graded credits of work to be considered for either of these honors. Students who are enrolled in the Honors Program or independent Research and receive a grade of IP for that work will have their qualifying grade point average determined on all other graded work.

Academic Good Standing

Students are considered to be in Academic Good Standing unless they are on Academic Probation or Suspension. Rhodes Express will send statements to that effect to other institutions in order for current Rhodes students to attend summer sessions or other programs.

Academic Probation and Suspension

To graduate, a student must have an overall grade point average of 2.000 (C) for all work attempted and for all work attempted in the major department. A student is subject to academic probation if the major grade point average falls below 2.000. A student is subject to academic probation or suspension if the cumulative grade point at the end of any semester or summer term falls below a minimum standard, which is dictated by the number of cumulative credits the student has earned. The cumulative standards are as follows:

Number of Credits Earned Minimum GPA to Avoid Suspension Minimum GPA to Avoid Probation
0-30 1.500 1.600
31-63 1.700 1.800
64-96 1.900 2.000
97 or more 2.000 2.000

In addition, a student is subject to probation in any semester in which the student earns fewer than twelve (12) credits and earns a grade point average of less than 1.500. NOTE: Students placed on probation due to semester grade point average who also enroll in summer courses at Rhodes will have their records reviewed at the end of the summer term. If they earn a minimum of four (4) Rhodes College credits with a minimum summer term grade point average of 2.000, they may be returned to good standing. The summer term grade point average is defined as the aggregate grade point average of all Rhodes summer work.  

A student on academic probation is not considered to be in good academic standing. Such students are ineligible to participate in some extracurricular activities, including intercollegiate athletics. A student is removed from academic probation upon attainment of the minimum standard grade point average based on the number of credits earned.

After being placed on academic probation, a student may be continued on academic probation for no more than two consecutive semesters. At the end of the third consecutive semester on academic probation, the student must be removed from probation or placed on academic suspension.

Academic suspension may be imposed at the end of the fall or spring semester. Fees will not be refunded or remitted, in whole or in part, in the event of a suspension imposed by the College.

The period of suspension is one semester. Summer term does not fulfill this suspension period.  Following suspension, a student may apply for readmission. Any student placed on academic suspension by the College for a second time may not be readmitted. No credit may be transferred for work done at another institution during the period of academic suspension.

A student has the right to request reconsideration of academic suspension. The Faculty Standards and Standing Committee considers the request. The Committee may allow the student to continue on academic probation into the next academic semester under specified conditions for academic achievement if it finds that the failure to achieve academically was due principally to extenuating circumstances and that the student has taken appropriate measures to ensure future academic success.

Semester grade point averages are affected by the conditional grades of X and E. The above provisions will apply when either of these grades is on the record in question. The action to suspend or be placed on academic probation may be delayed until it is determined what the grade point average will be when the conditional grades are removed.

Repeating a Course Because of Grade

Any student who has received a grade of D-, D, or D+ in a course may repeat the course for a higher grade. No additional credit may be earned when repeating a course for a higher grade. Any student who has failed a course may repeat the course for credit. The credits attempted and the grade points earned for each attempt of the course are included in the calculation of the student’s major grade point average and cumulative grade point average. However, only one failure of a course will be calculated in the grade point averages.

Grade Queries and Appeals

There is no more fundamental relationship in an academic program than that of the instructor and student. The Faculty and its academic officers work to support and to sustain a meaningful and productive instructor-student relationship to secure the educational aims of the College and of the members of its Faculty. Clearly the relationship is not one between equals, and this is most clearly evident when the instructor must assign a grade for the work required of, or expected of, a student.

Grade Queries. On occasion a student may believe that a grade assigned is incorrect. The student has the right to initiate a discussion with the instructor to determine that the grade given is in fact correct. If a mistake has been made, the instructor changes the grade and requests that the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs direct the Registrar to change a grade that has been officially entered on the student’s academic record.

Grade Appeals. In the event that, after consulting with the instructor, the student is not satisfied that a grade has been assigned fairly, the student may write an explanation of why he or she believes the grade assigned is not justified. The student gives this statement to the instructor, who may decide that the explanation warrants a reconsideration of the grade assigned. If the instructor decides not to change the assigned grade and discussion with the student does not result in the student’s agreement with this decision, the instructor asks the department chair to review the procedures for determining grades in the course, the student’s request, and the instructor’s response to it. The faculty member provides a written statement to the department chair about why the original grade is valid. Should the chair of the department determine that no lapse in procedure has occurred and that full attention has been given to the explanation by the instructor, the matter is closed. The chair of the department communicates this decision to the student and the instructor. Should the chair of the department determine that the procedure was not properly followed or that additional attention to the explanation is warranted, the chair discusses the situation with the instructor or the chair may obtain additional evaluations of the student’s work. These evaluations may be requested from colleagues within the Faculty whose knowledge and expertise are appropriate to a review of the student’s work. Having completed this additional evaluation, the chair’s determination about the grade closes the matter. The chair of the department communicates this final decision to the student, the instructor, and the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs.

Special Provisions. The period of time during which appeals of final grades can be made expires at the end of the fourth week of the semester following the posting of the grade.

In the event that appeals for reconsideration of grades involves grades assigned by a chair of a department, then the appeal procedure will be conducted by the senior member of the department, or the next senior member of the department in the event that the chair is the senior member. In instances where there are no other senior members in the department, the Associate Dean of Academic Affairs will oversee the inquiry.

The provisions outlined above are meant to apply to situations in which appeals for reconsideration of grades are made by students. If a student’s complaint involves a belief that he or she has been discriminated against because of the practices in managing a course, the Dean of the Faculty is the administrative officer to receive any such complaint. It may be that the Dean will ask that the general provisions above be followed in an investigation of possible discrimination.

Transcripts

Complete college records for each student are kept by the Registrar. Requests for transcripts must be in writing. Requests received via fax machine will be accepted although transcripts will not be transmitted via the fax. No transcript will be issued to students, current or past, whose financial accounts are delinquent.

Family Education Rights and Privacy Act

The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act of 1974, as amended, is a Federal law which states (a) that a written institutional policy must be established and (b) that a statement of adopted procedures covering the privacy rights of students be made available. The law provides that the institution will maintain the confidentiality of student education records.

Rhodes College accords all the rights under the law to enrolled students. No one outside the institution shall have access to nor will the institution disclose any information from students’ education records without the written consent of students except to personnel within the institution as defined below, to officials of other institutions in which student seek to enroll, to persons or organizations providing students financial aid, to agencies carrying out their accreditation function, to persons in compliance with a judicial order, and to persons in an emergency in order to protect the health or safety of students or other persons. All these exceptions are permitted under the Act. Only those members of the Rhodes College community, individually or collectively, acting in the students’ educational interest are allowed access to student education records. These members include personnel in the Office of the Registrar including student workers in that office, and the professional staff of the Office of Student Affairs, Financial Aid, Institutional Research, and College officials with a legitimate educational interest as determined by the Registrar. A College official may be determined to have legitimate educational interest if the information requested or released is necessary for the official to (a) perform appropriate tasks that are specified in his or her position description or by a contractual agreement; (b) perform a task related to a student’s education; (c) perform a task related to the discipline of the student; or (d) provide a service or benefit relating to the student or student’s family, such as health care, counseling, job placement, or financial aid.

At its discretion the institution may provide Directory Information in accordance with the provisions of the Act including student name, parents’ names, campus and home addresses and telephone numbers, cellular phone number, email address, photograph, dates of attendance, year of graduation, degree and honors awarded or expected, academic major, and faculty adviser. Students may withhold Directory Information by notifying the Registrar in writing at least sixty days prior to the first day of class for the fall semester. Requests for non-disclosure will be honored by the institution for only one academic year; therefore, authorization to withhold Directory Information must be filed annually.

The law provides students with the right to inspect and review information contained in their education records, to challenge the contents of their education records, to have a hearing if the outcome of the challenge is unsatisfactory, and to submit explanatory statements for inclusion in their files if the decisions of the hearing panels are unacceptable. The Registrar at Rhodes College has been designated by the institution to coordinate the inspection and review procedures for student educational records, which include admissions, personal, academic, and financial files, and academic and placement records. Students wishing to review their education records must make written requests to the Registrar listing the item or items of interest. Only records covered by the Act will be made available within forty-five days of the request.

In addition, the law only affords students a right to copies of their education records if a denial of copies would effectively prevent the students from exercising the right to inspect and review the records. Therefore, students may have copies made of their records with certain exceptions. The College reserves the right to deny copies of records, including academic transcripts, not required to be made available by FERPA in any of the following situations:

  1. The student lives within commuting distance of the school;
  2. The student has an unpaid financial obligation to the school;
  3. There is an unresolved disciplinary action against the student;
  4. The education record requested is an exam, or set of standardized test questions;
  5. The education record requested is a transcript of an original or source document which exists elsewhere.

Education records do not include records of instructional, supervisory, administrative, and educational personnel which are the sole possession of the maker and are not accessible or revealed to any individual except a temporary substitute. Other records not included are those of the campus safety department, student health records, employment records (except those records of student workers), or alumni records. Health records, however, may be reviewed by physicians of the students’ choosing.

Students may not inspect and review the following as outlined by the Act: financial information submitted by their parents; confidential letters and recommendations associated with admission to the College, employment or job placement, or honors to which they have waived their rights of inspection and review; or education records containing information about more than one student, in which case the institution will permit access only to that part of the record which pertains to the inquiring student. The institution is not required to permit students to inspect and review confidential letters and recommendations placed in their files prior to January 1, 1975, provided those letters were collected under established policies of confidentiality and were used only for the purposes for which they were collected.

Students who believe that their education records contain information that is inaccurate or misleading, or is otherwise in violation of their privacy or other rights, may discuss their problems informally with the Registrar. If the decisions of the Registrar are in agreement with the students’ requests, the appropriate records will be amended. If not, the students will be notified within a reasonable period of time that the records will not be amended; and they will be informed of their right to a formal hearing. Student requests for formal hearings must be made in writing to the Dean of the Faculty who, within a reasonable period of time after receiving such requests, will inform students of the date, place, and the time of the hearings. Students may present evidence relevant to the issues raised and may be assisted or represented at the hearings by one or more persons of their choice, including attorneys, at the students’ expense. The hearing panels which will adjudicate such challenges will be the Faculty Standards and Standing Committee.

Decisions of the hearing panel will be final, will be based solely on the evidence presented at the hearing, and will consist of written statements summarizing the evidence and stating the reasons for the decisions, and will be delivered to all parties concerned. The education records will be corrected or amended in accordance with the decisions of the hearing panels, if the decisions are in favor of the students. If the decisions are unsatisfactory to the students, the students may place with the education records statements commenting on the information in the records, or statements setting forth any reasons for disagreeing with the decisions of the hearing panels. The statements will be placed in the education records, maintained as part of the students’ records, and released whenever the records in question are disclosed.

Students who believe that the adjudications of their challenges were unfair or not in keeping with the provisions of the Act may request, in writing, assistance from the President of the College to aid them in filing complaints with The Family Educational Rights and Privacy Act Office (FERPA), Department of Education, Washington, D.C. 20201.

Revisions and clarifications of this policy will be published as experience with the law and the institutional policy warrants. Annual notice of compliance with the Act is published in the Rhodes College Catalog.

Foundations Curriculum

The Foundations Curriculum

In the Fall of 2007, the Foundations Curriculum, an academic curriculum that establishes a new approach to the study of the liberal arts and sciences at the College, was fully implemented. The Foundations Curriculum was adopted by the Faculty in order to achieve several goals:

  1. To assist students to understand the goals of a liberal arts education and to take greater responsibility for their education. The curriculum gives students greater freedom to follow their academic interests and aspirations within a framework of Foundation requirements that are fundamental to the study of the liberal arts;
  2. To provide a more transparent and streamlined curriculum by framing the degree requirements in terms of skills and content areas;
  3. To bring greater focus to the courses students take and to recognize that their activities inside and outside the classroom should be mutually informative and energizing;
  4. To create the opportunity to offer more courses reflective of the scholarly interests of the faculty and to develop innovative courses that respond to the developing currents in contemporary thought; and,
  5. To establish four courses as the standard load per semester in order to allow for a more focused educational experience for all of our students. The Foundations curriculum enhances the way in which the four components of the Rhodes education work together: the Foundation requirements (commonly referred to as “F1”, “F2”, etc.), the concentration in a Major, the choice of elective courses, and participation in co-curricular activities.

The Foundation of the Liberal Arts Requirements

The Foundation requirements establish a framework for liberal education and life-long learning. Unless mentioned otherwise in the description, Foundation requirements will be met by taking one course specified as meeting that requirement, and most requirements will have courses in several different departments that do so. 
Upon completion of the requirements and the attainment of a Bachelor’s degree from Rhodes, each graduate of the College should be able to:

  1. Critically examine questions of meaning and value. Questions about the meaning and purpose of life are central to human existence. Every area of the Rhodes curriculum touches in some way upon such problems and questions, whether directly as in moral philosophy, epic poetry, and political thought, or indirectly as in studies of the history of medieval Europe, economic theory, and the physical structure of the universe. This requirement is to be satisfied with three courses, either the Search sequence or the Life sequence.
  2. Develop excellence in written communication. The ability to express concise and methodical arguments in clear and precise prose is essential to success in most courses at Rhodes and in most of the vocations Rhodes graduates pursue. This requirement will be satisfied by one writing seminar (taken in the first year) and two writing intensive courses, one of which will be in Search or Life.
  3. Understand how change over time has shaped human cultures. Examining the responses of individuals and societies to change over time helps us understand the processes of transformation that affect all human cultures. It also provides new perspectives on the present.
  4. Read and interpret literary texts. Literary texts provide challenging and influential representations of human experience in its individual, social, and cultural dimensions. Critical and sensitive reading of significant works refines analytical skills and develops an awareness of the power of language.
  5. Create art and analyze artistic expression. Humans express themselves creatively through art forms that are aural, visual, and performed. Creating and studying art are particularly effective ways of understanding art. This requirement may be satisfied with a designated course in which the primary and sustained focus is artistic creativity.
  6. Gain facility with mathematical reasoning and expression. Some human experiences are most effectively expressed in mathematical language, and important areas of intellectual inquiry rely on mathematics as a tool of analysis and as a means of conveying information.
  7. Explore and understand scientific approaches to the natural world. Our experience of the world is profoundly influenced by a scientific understanding of the physical realm of our existence.  To make informed decisions about the production and application of scientific knowledge, students need to understand the way science examines the natural world.  Students acquire such knowledge by learning scientific facts and by understanding and engaging through laboratory work the powerful methods by which scientific information is obtained.
  8. Explore and understand the systematic analysis of human interaction and contemporary institutions. Human development, thought, and aspiration occur within societies, and those societies are shaped by various social and political institutions. Familiarity with the systematic analysis of contemporary institutions is an important component of a sound understanding of the world and is a foundation for responsible citizenship.
  9. View the world from more than one cultural perspective. The individual of today's world must be able to understand issues and events through multiple cultural perspectives by developing abilities that facilitate intelligent and respectful interaction in various cultural contexts.  These abilities include recognizing, understanding and articulating the similarities and differences of cultural perspectives, including one's own.
  10. Demonstrate intermediate second-language proficiency. Proficiency in a second language allows a level of access to a culture that is not achievable through sources in translation. Intermediate proficiency includes the ability to understand and communicate with members of the target culture, negotiate differences between the second language and the first, and use the second language as a tool for human communication.
  11. Participate in activities that broaden connections between the classroom and the world. Rhodes students are asked to become engaged citizens, participating in the local community - its politics, its culture, its problems, its aspirations – and in the world community. Students gain skill in connecting knowledge to its uses through educational experience that takes them off campus.
  12. Develop skills to become an informed, active and engaged student-citizen. The F12 provides opportunities to explore core aspects of one’s community and one’s self.  Students will learn how to thrive within a learning environment, and how to develop the skills and discover resources necessary to flourish as an individual, as a scholar, and as an active citizen of the interconnected communities of Rhodes College, Memphis, and the wider world. This requirement is fulfilled through the successful completion of a first year seminar two-semester sequence at Rhodes as approved by the Foundations Curriculum Committee.

Foundations Programs in the Humanities

Questions about the meaning and purpose of life are central to human existence. Every area of the Rhodes curriculum touches in some way upon such questions, whether directly as in moral philosophy, epic poetry, and political thought, or indirectly as in studies of the history of medieval Europe, economic theory, and the physical structure of the universe. The programs Life: Then and Now (“Life”) and The Search for Values in the Light of Western Religion and History (“Search”) help students think about these issues and so provide the foundation for the entire curriculum.

Life and Search students meet in small groups led by faculty members to analyze challenging and controversial texts that have shaped and reshaped thought, particularly in Western societies. Because of its prominence in world history, these courses pay special attention to the Bible and the traditions that have emerged in relationship to it. Life and Search courses endeavor to make the familiar unfamiliar by examining critically the logical and historical foundations of received opinion and texts. They also make the unfamiliar familiar by studying traditions, artifacts, and issues that most students have not yet encountered. Through both programs, students learn to appreciate the role of historical context in shaping values, beliefs, and practices and to reflect critically on their own values, beliefs, and practices. Life and Search stress skills that are central to the whole curriculum: careful reading, analytical writing, critical thinking, and discussion.

At the start of their first year in the College, students choose to pursue either Life or Search and generally remain in their chosen program until they have completed it. The two programs share many features but also are distinctive. The following descriptions clarify the differences between Life and Search.

Life: Then and Now

The student who chooses the Life: Then and Now program completes a three semester sequence of courses. The first courses are taken in the fall and spring semesters of the first year. The third course may be taken at any time in the remaining three years of the student’s college career.

The first two courses in the Life sequence are Religious Studies 101-102, The Bible: Texts and Contexts. These courses introduce students to the academic study of the Bible and the traditions of interpretation and reflection based upon it. This two semester sequence follows a basic chronological development, from the earliest biblical sources to modern interpretations. The first semester of the course is taught by members of the Department of Religious Studies with primary competence in the study of the Bible and the second semester by members with expertise in theological reflection and the disciplines of the history of religion. Both courses emphasize careful textual analysis, clear and effective writing, and active discussion with peers. Complete descriptions of these courses may be found in the Religious Studies section of the catalogue.

The third Life course is chosen from a variety of offerings in Religious Studies, Philosophy, and Greek and Roman Studies. These courses build on the skills and base of knowledge developed in first year Life and further refine and augment them. The third Life course is selected from an array that includes advanced study of the Bible, theology and ethics, philosophy, and the history of religions. The spectrum of upper-level Life courses will change periodically to reflect student and faculty interests but includes staples such as “Archaeology and the Bible,” “King David,” “Sex and Gender in the New Testament,” “Paul,” “Contemporary Theology,” “Holocaust,” “Islam,” and “Religious Traditions of Asia,” “Religion in America,” “Medieval Philosophy,” and “Ethics.” With a wide variety of choices, students may select a third Life course that suits their interests and best complements their overall academic plan.

The Search for Values in the Light of Western History and Religion

Throughout its sixty-six year history, Search has embodied the College’s guiding concern for helping students to become men and women of purpose, to think critically and intelligently about their own moral views, and to approach the challenges of social and moral life sensitively and deliberately. Students are encouraged to engage texts directly and to confront the questions and issues they encounter through discussions with their peers, exploratory writing assignments, and ongoing personal reflection. Special emphasis is given to the development and cultivation of critical thinking and writing skills under the tutelage of a diverse faculty drawn from academic disciplines across the Humanities, Fine Arts, Natural Sciences, and Social Sciences. Students in this course are challenged and invigorated by intimate encounters with the voices of culture and the pinnacles of thought, develop a respect and understanding of great moral, political, historical, and religious principles and quandaries, and become better prepared to understand and respond to the diversity of human values in a complex world.

In the first year, the syllabus is centered on the biblical and classical traditions. An ongoing and intensive study of the Hebrew Bible and the New Testament explores the faith, values, and ideals of the ancient Israelites as well as early Christians. Interwoven with this exploration is an examination of the epic tradition of the ancient Near East and the rich and varied wellsprings of the ancient Greek and Roman civilizations, including epics, historiography, philosophy, poetry, and drama.

In the third semester of the sequence, students choose from among a number of disciplinary tracks, including literature, religious studies, politics, philosophy, history, and fine arts. The third semester covers the Renaissance, the Protestant and Catholic Reformations, the Scientific Revolution, the Enlightenment, and the Modern Era. The course concludes with study of a number of revolutionary thinkers and movements of the nineteenth and twentieth centuries that challenge the basic principles of Western thought, culture, and religion.

In all courses of the sequence students read original source texts (in English translation) that encourage them to grapple first-hand with ideas as presented by the author, rather than relying on interpretation by secondary sources. Continuous effort is made to bring to light the influence and impact of ancient values on the contemporary world, as well as the cross-fertilization of ideas between Western culture and world civilization as a whole.

Information Technology Services

Richard T. Trenthem, Jr. Director of Information Technology Services. B.A., Rhodes College; M.L.I.S., University of Texas.
Sue D. Hall. Programmer-Analyst. B.A., Rhodes College.
Rose Ann Hicks. Media Center Supervisor. B.A., M.Ed., Southeastern Oklahoma State University. 
Caley Foreman. Senior Desktop Specialist. B.A., Mississippi State University.
Corey A. Phillips. Multimedia Support Manager. B.A. University of Mississippi
Lance Kimbrell. Desktop Support Specialist. A.A.S. Mississippi Delta Community College.
Stacy S. Pennington. Associate Database Analyst. B.A., Rhodes College.
Jermaine S. Pickens. Application Specialist. B.S. Alabama A&M University.
Edward A. Trouy. Network and Computer Engineer. A.E.T., State Technical Institute, Memphis.
Douglas G. Walker. Systems Administrator. A.A.S., State Technical Institute, Memphis.

Rhodes is committed to providing a wide range of technlogy resources to support the diverse work of faculty, staff and students. 

Information Technology Services (ITS) is located on the lower level of Barret Library. Computing facilities include servers that provide network file sharing, email, an on-line library system, delivery of online course materials and electronic forums. Additionally there are three computer labs with approximately 90 workstations that are connected to the campus network. Equipped with a multimedia projection system, two of the labs are teaching labs. Computing resources dedicated to specific disciplines are located in various academic buildings on campus, notably in the science and mathematics buildings. The campus computer network is built upon an Ethernet backbone is linked to the Internet, enabling global communication. There are over 50 “smart” classrooms across campus equipped with full multimedia capability. Wireless access is available in most locations throughout campus, including common spaces outdoors. and all of the residence halls.

Students have access to email, fileservers, printing and the Internet. Assistance for students is available on several levels. Student Computer Consultants are available in the Computer Depot and student assistants are available to assist users and assure proper operation of printers and equipment. Assistance can also be obtained from the Information Desk located on the main floor of Barret Library. 

Meeman Center for Lifelong Learning

John H. Rone, Director. B.A., Rhodes College; M.A., University of Memphis.
Cissy Whittaker. Administrative Assistant. B.A., University of Memphis.
Tamara L. Sears. Administrative Assistant, A.A., Richland Community College

Meeman Center for Lifelong Learning is Rhodes’ commitment to learning as a lifelong process. Since its inception in 1944, the Center has been an integral part of the College, successfully engaging adults of the Mid-South in the liberal arts and sciences. Meeman Center promotes personal and professional development by extending Rhodes’ tradition of excellence in liberal education to individuals and businesses. All programs, courses, and trips offered by Meeman Center are described in detail in brochures available on request from the Meeman Center office or on the web.

Non-Credit Courses

Lifelong learning courses are offered in literature, art, languages, science, current events, history, religion, philosophy, and other areas of interest. Courses vary in length and run in the Fall (September through November) and Spring (January through May). The instructors are Rhodes faculty and invited experts, including Rhodes alumni. Online registration is available at meeman.rhodes.edu.

Institute on the Profession of Law

Meeman Center offers an annual ethics seminar for attorneys to earn dual Continuing Legal Education (CLE) units. The seminar emphasizes national speakers, broad issues in law, and enlightened discussion and reflection. Rhodes faculty are a vital part of the Institute, both as planners and participants. The Institute is certified by the Tennessee, Arkansas, and Mississippi Continuing Legal Education Commissions.

Continuing Education Units

Generally, Continuing Education Units (CEUs) are earned through any Meeman Center non-credit course. Continuing Legal Education (CLE) hours are earned through the Institute on the Profession of Law and certain other CLE Commission-certified continuing education courses. Contact the Meeman Center office for more information.

Opportunities for Individualized Study

The Fellowships Program

Rhodes recognizes that a liberal education extends beyond the classroom and encourages our students to take part in outside study, research, creative activity, internships, and community service—locally, nationally, and internationally. Fellowships are extended activities that help contextualize the work students do inside the classroom, foster a sense of professional identity, include team-building or collaborative learning, and develop critical reflection skills. Virtually any outside activity that complements coursework and involves significant reflective work can potentially be part of the Fellowships Program at Rhodes.

At its best, experiential learning allows a student to practice skills and explore more deeply principles acquired through coursework. Most often the opportunity to discover and create on one’s own builds confidence and passion. Students return to the classroom with renewed interest and focus.

Rhodes has pioneered several programs such as CODA, Crossroads to Freedom, Rhodes St. Jude Summer Plus, the Rhodes Institute for Regional Studies, the Mike Curb Institute for Music and the Rhodes Summer Service Fellowship Program that provide diverse opportunities for student engagement beyond the classroom. These programs have been so popular and transformative that the college is now engaged in an effort to offer even more opportunities for students to pursue their own personal interests, particularly through projects that involve sustained mentorship and a commitment to as many as possible of five student learning outcomes associated with experiential education:

  • Integration of factual knowledge, fundamental principles, and/or specific skills learned in the classroom with the fellowship activity
  • Strengthening analytical and/or creative abilities toward establishment of a professional identity
  • Evidence of participatory, collaborative, and/or team-oriented learning
  • Personal and social development
  • Development of critical reflection skills

The Fellowships Program can also provide funding for those projects that require it, with regular application deadlines occurring in mid-February, August, and November.

For more information, contact the Director of Fellowships in Burrow Hall.

The Honors Program

The Honors program is a culminating experience in the major field, for seniors only. It is the principal means whereby a student may do more independent, intensive, and individual work than can be done in the regular degree programs. The Honors work offers an excellent introduction to graduate study as it employs the full resources of library and laboratory and encourages independent research and study.

All Honors programs include a project of a scholarly and creative nature. This project can be research culminating in a written report or thesis, or it can be a creative project as represented by an original production. An oral presentation of the final project is also expected. A copy of the final report or production is placed in a permanent file or on display in the library.

Students considering Honors normally take a one-credit tutorial in the second semester of the junior year. Emphasis in the tutorial will be selection of a topic, preliminary research and definition of the project, and preparation of the Honors application.

Although each department and program sets its own departmental and program requirements for Honors, there are general College requirements for the Honors program. To be eligible for the Honors program a student must have a minimum cumulative grade point average and a major grade point average of 3.5000 at the time of application for honors. The student must graduate with a cumulative grade point average and a major grade point average of 3.5000 in order to receive the honors designation at commencement.

At least four credits per semester in the senior year must be earned in Honors Tutorial courses. Up to eight additional credits of tutorial or related course work may be counted, resulting in a maximum of sixteen credits of Honors in the senior year.

Special attention is necessary to ensure the completion of the Honors project in time for it to be evaluated and approved. For this reason, a special timetable for submission, reviews, and approvals of Honors projects is set by each department and program. Failure to meet announced deadlines may result in the failure to gain Honors recognition.

Descriptions of the requirements for Honors are listed in each departmental and program section of this catalogue. The Honors Registration form is available as a downloadable form on the Rhodes Express website.

Directed Inquiry

The term directed inquiry indicates a type of independent study designed to give more individuality than is provided by regular coursework. A directed inquiry is a project agreed upon by a student and professor; it may be a laboratory experiment, special readings on a given topic, some type of art work, a group of essays, etc. The details of the project are agreed upon by the student and the professor. Directed inquiries may not be used to satisfy general degree requirements.

Credits for a directed inquiry range from one to four. Forty-six hours of work, including outside reading, experiments and conferences, are required for one credit. No more than twelve credits may be earned in any one department. The maximum number of credits for all directed inquiries allowed is twenty-four. Normally a first-year student may not undertake a directed inquiry until after the completion of one semester of regular studies. Special students are generally not eligible for directed inquiries.

Proposals for directed inquiries must be submitted for approval to the chair of the department. Appropriate forms are available online. These forms call for details such as the beginning and ending dates of the project and set forth specific rules governing such things as extensions or other possible considerations. The student should become familiar with this form well in advance of the date intended to submit a proposal so that everything will be in order and approved by the department when submitted. Applications for directed inquiries are to be submitted in time for the department to act and submitted to the Registrar before the date set for the project to begin. Normally a student will not be permitted to take more than one directed inquiry at a time.

In the event that more than two students are interested in a directed inquiry on the same topic, a special topics course may be taught. Such courses must conform to the standard forty-six hours of study per credit.

The Tutorial Plan

The tutorial plan of instruction, like the Honors Program and the Directed Inquiry, has as its chief purposes the individualizing of instruction and the provision of a means whereby students may go beyond the scope of a class course, both in the amount of work done and the kinds of interests pursued. The method is often that of extensive reading under guidance, and conferences with the tutor on the material read, either individually or in a small group.

The content of a tutorial is usually that of a regular catalogue course that is not scheduled to be taught during a particular term. A student may request that the course be taught in the tutorial fashion if a member of the faculty is available and agrees to direct the course. Approval by the faculty member, the chairperson of the department involved, and the Registrar is necessary for the tutorial to be scheduled. At a minimum, forty-six hours of study are required for each credit or a total of 184 hours of study for a four credit course.

Interdisciplinary Programs

Interdisciplinary programs exist to provide an appropriate structure within which to offer study opportunities that do not fit within the bounds of existing departments, to bring together faculty and students from several disciplines to study areas of interest that cross traditional departmental lines and require an interdisciplinary approach, and to inform the campus community at large of the nature and importance of these areas.

Descriptions of Interdisciplinary Programs currently approved may be found under the listing for “Interdisciplinary Study” in the Courses of Instruction section of this catalogue.

Internships

Rhodes recognizes the need and the value of integrating traditional academic work and practical application. Internships are important ways in which students may have this experience.
Internship credit is given for involvement in off-campus work related to a student’s academic work and supervised by a faculty member of the corresponding department. Internships are defined within the course structures of several academic departments. Requirements for acceptance as an intern are set by each department. Internship experiences earning 3 (three) or more credits must satisfy the F11 requirement, and the student is expected to be able to integrate academic work with on-the-job activities. Internship experiences earning 1 (one) or 2 (two) credits will include a reflective component such as a journal or final paper, and the student will meet with the faculty supervisor at least twice to discuss the internship and reflective component. Special internship opportunities can be proposed subject to approval by the department concerned. Interested students should contact the chairperson of the department and the Career Services Office.

Students pursuing an internship experience arranged through a department and/or the Career Services Office must register for the appropriate course in order to earn academic credit. This credit is considered part of the course load during a regular semester and during summer session. Normally, forty-six hours of work, including on-site work as an intern, outside reading, and conferences, are required for one credit. Students with summer internships must register for the credit and pay the summer session tuition in order to receive the credit. Students may not earn both academic credit and a salary or wages of any kind for the same internship.

No more than eight (8) credits in internships may be earned in one department per semester. A student may apply toward a degree a maximum of eight (8) credits of internship.

The Nancy Hughes Morgan Program in Hospital Chaplaincy

This program is designed for pre-medical students and persons going into other health-care related disciplines, the ministry, and counseling fields. It offers a carefully supervised internship in local hospitals where students serve as chaplains’ assistants, develop counseling skills, and sharpen their abilities to listen and respond to patient needs.

The Memphis Consortium of Colleges

Through an arrangement between Rhodes, Christian Brothers University, The University of Memphis, and the Memphis College of Art, Rhodes students may take courses at those institutions during the fall and spring semesters. Only a certain set of courses is available at Christian Brothers and The University of Memphis; a student should contact the Registrar for further information. A student must receive approval for the course from the Chair of the Department of Art at Rhodes before registering for the course at the College of Art. The student then registers for the desired class at either college and includes the class on the semester’s course schedule at Rhodes. The course credit counts toward the semester’s credits at Rhodes; and as long as the consortium course does not result in a course overload for the semester, there is no additional tuition charge. The final grade for the course is computed in the student’s grade point average as if it were a Rhodes grade. Normally, only one course may be taken per semester through the Consortium arrangement.

Although the Consortium arrangement is not available during the summer, coursework taken at the Memphis College of Art during the summer may be applied to the Rhodes degree as Rhodes credit.

Opportunities for Study Abroad and Domestic Off-Campus Study

Rhodes encourages its students to study off-campus through the programs it administers or through programs administered through other institutions. Off-campus study, whether domestic or international in scope, requires substantial prior planning. Students interested in pursuing such a course of study should formulate and clarify their plans well in advance.

Off-campus study opportunities are coordinated by the Buckman Center for International Education. The staff in the Buckman Center can assist students in researching off-campus study programs and can facilitate completion of the program’s application process. Students are responsible for meeting with their academic advisors to discuss program choices and for course selections. Students applying for a Rhodes program must have a minimum grade point average of 2.0 unless otherwise specified and must be in good social and academic standing.

Off-Campus Study Application Process

Each student who intends to pursue off-campus study must complete the Off-Campus Study Application available on the Buckman Center website. This Application, when signed by all appropriate officials, grants approval for the program of study and, subject to general college policies regarding transfer credit, assigns appropriate credit for the academic work successfully completed. The above mentioned website contains instructions, checklists, deadlines, application materials, and policies.

Off-Campus Study Program Transfer Credit Policies

  1. For all transfer credit, it is the student’s responsibility to do the following:
    1. Verify that the off-campus study program/university is on the List of Recognized Programs/Providers or has been successfully petitioned. **
    2. Verify that courses intended to be taken for major or minor credit have been approved by the appropriate department or program chair in consultation with the faculty adviser. Such approval is granted only through the signature of the department or program chair on the student’s Off-Campus Study Application.
    3. Request an official transcript with final grades from the program attended be sent to: 

      Office of the Registrar
      Rhodes College
      2000 N. Parkway
      Memphis, TN 38112
  2. At the relevant academic department’s discretion, transfer courses taken abroad can be used to satisfy major and minor requirements. Courses for transfer credit must be passed with a minimum of “C-” to be eligible for transfer credit.
  3. Credit should be approved prior to enrollment in courses. However, in some cases it may be necessary to postpone approval until course descriptions, syllabi, papers, and tests are examined.
  4. Should a student’s course selection change for any reason after submission of the application, substituted courses are not transferrable unless approved by an appropriate department or program chair. Such approval must be sought immediately (i.e., email); copies of any such correspondence should also be directed to the Director of International Programs and to the Registrar.
  5. Students are strongly encouraged to contact the Director of International Programs prior to final course registration at the host institution in order to confirm course credit approvals. Retroactive approval may be sought but is not guaranteed and must be obtained before the conclusion of the first semester of the student’s return to Rhodes.
  6. To be accepted for credit, each course, whether for major/minor credit or elective credit, must be judged comparable in terms of content and quality to a course in the curriculum at Rhodes or it must be judged to be consistent with the liberal arts and sciences curriculum and of a quality comparable to that expected of courses at Rhodes. Courses intended to be taken for major or minor credit must be approved by the appropriate department or program chair in consultation with the faculty adviser. Such approval is granted only through the signature of the department or program chair on the student’s Off Campus Study Application. Elective credit will be reviewed by the appropriate academic officer acting on behalf of the Foundations Curriculum Committee.
  7. Students who study abroad on a Recognized Program/Provider will normally satisfy the F11 requirement.** In addition, students may, through appropriate course work, satisfy up to two additional Foundation requirements while abroad on a semester-long program or up to three additional Foundation requirements for a year-long program. The Director of International Programs will recommend to the Foundations Curriculum Committee, in consultation with the Registrar and other relevant faculty members as necessary, the appropriateness of the course(s) taken abroad for Foundational credit.
  8. Programs vary greatly in their academic structure. At some universities abroad, three courses is considered a full load, while at others a full load may be as many as 8-9 courses. Rhodes College students must maintain what is considered a full-time course load at the institution abroad. Normally, a student cannot earn more credit while on a semester study program than could have been earned in a regular semester at Rhodes. Failure to satisfactorily complete coursework needed to maintain satisfactory academic progress for financial aid purposes may result in the loss of financial aid renewal eligibility.
  9. No strict correlation exists between contact hours in courses taken off-campus and credits awarded by Rhodes. Many European institutions utilize the ECTS crediting system in which one ECTS credit is comparable to one-half credit at Rhodes. For example, a course worth 8 ECTS credits will normally transfer to Rhodes as 4 credits. If the host program’s transcript does not translate easily to “American” credit (e.g., credits, quarter hours, semester hours, units) or does not provide a conversion scale, or if the host institution’s academic calendar differs significantly from the Rhodes semester calendar, the following statement can act as general principle:
    A student pursuing a fully approved, full-time program of coursework on study abroad for a period roughly equivalent to Rhodes’ fall or spring semester will usually receive 16 transfer credits from Rhodes upon the successful completion of all coursework. Successful completion is defined as earning a grade equivalent to “C-” or better in each course.
  10. All courses should be taken for graded credit.

** Please refer to the List or Recognized Programs/Providers on the Buckman Center Website.

Rhodes Study Abroad Programs

Rhodes College’s commitment to international and cross-cultural study is most powerfully expressed in its programs abroad. The College offers a semester-long program, European Studies, in conjunction with the University of the South. Rhodes also offers a variety of other spring/summer programs which vary year to year. British Studies at Oxford is currently on hiatus. Please inquire with the Buckman Center for a current listing of summer program offerings. Credit earned in all these programs is Rhodes credit. Rhodes does not provide financial aid for summer study; however, a limited amount of scholarship assistance is available. Please see the Director of International Programs for more information.

European Studies

European Studies is a seventeen-week program offered jointly by Rhodes and The University of the South (Sewanee) that takes place from mid-summer through early fall. It is a full semester of study abroad and offers the unique experience of studying in a variety of locations in Europe in a special and quite different learning environment. The program begins in July with four weeks of study at Rhodes College with Rhodes and Sewanee faculty. The students then travel to England where there is a ten day practicum conducted by British tutors at the Universities of York and Durham, followed by six weeks with British instructors at Lincoln College, Oxford. The program closes with five weeks of travel in Western Europe, accompanied by British tutors in Art History.

Rhodes Exchange Programs

Rhodes College has formal bilateral exchange agreements with The University of Antwerp, Belgium; The University of Poitiers, France; Nebrissensis University, Madrid, Spain; The University of Tübingen, Germany; The University of Koblenz-Landau, Germany; The University of Aberdeen, Scotland; The University of Lima, Peru; Rhodes University, Grahamstown, South Africa; and The Iberoamericana University in Puebla, Mexico. Students participating in one of these exchanges pay tuition and, in some programs, room and board, to Rhodes, receiving financial aid as if they were at Rhodes. The payments to Rhodes meet the expenses of the exchange students from abroad during their stay at Rhodes, while Rhodes students receive tuition, or tuition, room and board overseas. Credit earned at the institution abroad is treated as transfer credit. The number of students who can participate in these exchanges with other institutions is limited.

Rhodes is also a member of ISEP (The International Student Exchange Program), an organization of more than 200 colleges and universities located throughout the United States and in Africa, Asia, Australia, Canada, Europe and Latin America. Through ISEP-Exchange, Rhodes students can participate on international exchange by paying room, board, and tuition to Rhodes, utilizing any institutional and federal aid granted to them. Exchanges can occur in any discipline and can range in length from one academic term to one year. In most cases, ISEP-Exchange participants are matriculated directly into the host institution and pursue courses with native students. Credit earned in these exchanges is treated as transfer credit.

Other Programs Abroad

In addition to exchange programs and Rhodes programs, there are numerous programs offered by other colleges and universities and international agencies. Information on many of these programs can be found in the Buckman Center for International Education. Credit earned in these other programs is treated as transfer credit. Normally a student cannot earn more credit while on a semester study abroad program than could have been earned in a regular semester at Rhodes. Rhodes College financial aid is not available for these other programs; however, certain types of federal financial aid may be applied to these programs. Rhodes’ Buckman Fellowships for Study Abroad are available for any approved semester or year-long program abroad.

Requirements for a Degree

Rhodes College offers a four-year program of study in the liberal arts and sciences leading to the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science degree. Candidates for either degree must complete the Foundation Requirements. Students majoring in a science may earn the Bachelor of Science degree. Rhodes also offers a Master of Science degree in Accounting.

The Bachelor’s Degree

The Bachelor’s degree is granted to students who have completed the required 128 credits and the appropriate degree requirements. The degree requirements under the Foundations Curriculum include at least thirteen courses (52 credits) and as many as sixteen courses (64 credits) as described below. Although 52 total credits are required, several of these credits will be satisfied by courses taken in a particular major. Moreover, the total number of credits required to satisfy the writing and language requirements may vary because the foreign language requirement may be satisfied by successful completion of a proficiency exam. In addition, some courses satisfy more than one foundation requirement, effectively decreasing the number of required courses. Thus, the number of credits available for electives is dependent upon several factors: the major, whether the degree is the Bachelor of Arts or the Bachelor of Science, how many courses a student must take to satisfy the writing and language requirements, and how many courses outside the major a student must take to satisfy the foundation requirements.

Once the degree is conferred, no additional course work may be taken and applied to that degree. Additional course work may be applied toward a second degree or taken in a non-degree seeking status, however.

Bachelor of Arts. The Bachelor of Arts degree is awarded to those students who complete the degree requirements as stated above and more fully described below, including the completion of the requirements for a major as outlined in the appropriate section of this catalog.

Bachelor of Science. The Bachelor of Science degree may be earned by students who complete the appropriate requirements for a degree with a major in Biology, Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Biomathematics, Chemistry, Computer Science, Environmental Science, Mathematics, Neuroscience, or Physics. Self-designed interdisciplinary majors may earn a Bachelor of Science degree if all of the departments involved offer a BS degree or if at least one of the departments involved offers a BS degree, the major requires at least 28 credits of natural sciences and math, and the student completes a total of at least 36 credits of the natural sciences and math. Please see the Interdisciplinary Studies section of the catalogue for a fuller description of self-designed interdisciplinary majors.

Although the College, through various advising methods, assists a student in planning and following a program of study which will lead to a degree, the student is ultimately responsible for keeping track of progress toward a degree, for knowing and fulfilling all degree and major requirements, and for arranging a course of study accordingly.

Total Credits for the Degree

A total of 128 credits are required for the Bachelor’s degree. A student must earn at least 50 percent of these credits at Rhodes. The senior year, defined as 32 credits or the last 25 percent of the total credits required, must be spent in residence. No more than eight (8) of these credits may be transfer credits.

A student must earn a cumulative grade point average of no less than 2.000 (C) to qualify for the degree. A student may apply toward a degree a maximum of eight (8) credits in internships.

A maximum combined total of credits equaling 25 percent of the degree requirement may be earned through Advanced Placement, Cambridge Pre-U, International Baccalaureate, and Option International Baccalaureate examinations. A student earning both transfer credits and Advanced Placement, Cambridge Pre-U, International Baccalaureate and/or Option International Baccalaureate credits may apply those credits to a Rhodes degree up to a maximum combined total of fifty percent of the total credits required for a degree.

Concentration of Study in a Major Discipline

Students’ majors may be directly related to an anticipated vocation, but that is not their primary purpose in a liberal arts curriculum. The qualities of mind and abilities that will serve students best in their careers are developed within the curriculum as a whole. The major is a refinement of intellectual discipline and a deepening of understanding of an area of study. The academic enrichment gained through a major affords access to other disciplines as well as an appreciation of the complexity of other fields of study. Students should consider carefully how all of the courses they select can enrich and complement work done in the major.

The Choice of Elective Courses

The Rhodes curriculum is designed specifically to offer students opportunities to combine a carefully structured and intense study of at least one subject with the broad and diverse understanding that is characteristic of an education in the liberal arts and sciences. Although required to meet certain objectives, the Foundation courses may be selected from a wide range of course offerings. These are only the beginning of a student’s exploration of the fields of human knowledge and creativity. In selecting courses beyond these requirements and outside the major discipline, students should consider the ways in which their education can be broadened, complemented, and enriched.

Participation in Co-Curricular Activities

A comprehensive liberal arts education includes regular engagement with cultural activities and diverse perspectives not only in the classroom, but also in the college community and in communities beyond the college. Students become full participants in the campus community as they join others in a variety of extra-curricular and co-curricular activities. These include student government, music ensembles, athletics, campus publications, theatre productions, and many others. Service-learning opportunities, international education opportunities, and undergraduate research provide students and faculty with ways to integrate classroom and laboratory work with out-of-class experiences, and a student’s experience in a course can be enriched in significant ways by the selection of complementary co-curricular activities.

The Major

A student must complete any one of the department-based majors, one of the interdisciplinary majors listed elsewhere in this catalogue or an approved interdisciplinary major formulated in consultation with faculty members.

Detailed descriptions of the department-based majors are given under the departmental descriptions in the section entitled “Courses of Instruction.” The Interdisciplinary majors are described in the section “Interdisciplinary Study,”

No major may require more than fifty percent of the total credits required for the degree. At least fifty percent of the course requirements for a major or minor must be Rhodes credit. All majors require a capstone experience that gives the students an opportunity to demonstrate their progress towards the educational goals established for their majors. This capstone experience usually includes demonstrations of proficiency in wiriting and speaking and a familiarity with the foundations and contemporary concerns of the major discipline.

A 2.000 (C) grade point average in the major is required for graduation. The major grade point average is determined by computing the grade point average of all courses required for the major as described in this catalog and any other courses taken in the declared major. The computation of a major grade point average for an interdisciplinary major shall include all courses described as required and as elective courses.

A student pursuing a double major or a second Bachelor’s degree may use no more than four (4) of the same courses to satisfy requirements in both majors unless specified as required by one or both of the majors.

In the case of changes in the requirement for a major, students may follow the requirements stated in the catalogue that defines their general degree requirements or in any later catalogue except in cases where changes in departmental course offerings makes the original major requirements impossible to meet.

Declaration of a Major. Students must declare an intended major or majors no later than mid-term of the spring semester of their sophomore year. Students in good standing will be accepted as majors by any department they may choose but must first discuss their suitability for work in the department with the department’s chairperson. At the same time the prospective major should make a tentative plan of course work to be completed in the student’s remaining semesters. A faculty adviser from the major department is assigned or selected by each new major to aid in this planning. Forms for declaring a major are available online at www.rhodes.edu/rhodesexpress/14536.asp. Students declaring two majors will have an adviser in each major department, but one adviser will be designated as the primary adviser. Students who are delinquent in filing a declaration of major will not be allowed to register for classes until the appropriate form is received by the Registrar. While students may change majors, changes made after the sophomore year may be difficult to accommodate in the remaining semesters.

Interdisciplinary Major. Some students prefer to study in an area that can best be covered by combining the work in two or even three academic departments. Interdisciplinary majors are important ways in which the faculty can meet the special academic needs of these students.

The section listing titled “Interdisciplinary Study” summarizes existing interdisciplinary major requirements for pre-approved curriculum structures. Students who wish to declare any of the established interdisciplinary majors may do so by filing the normal Declaration of Major form with the Office of the Registrar. Any deviation from the program of study outlined in the description must be approved by the chairpersons of the departments involved.

Students who wish to declare an interdisciplinary major that does not have a program of study already defined should follow the appropriate steps in order to secure the necessary approvals within a reasonable time and to ensure an adequate review of the proposed program of study. Those steps are detailed in the “Interdisciplinary Studies” section of this catalogue. The proposed program of study must include specific provisions for a senior seminar or integrating senior experience. The “Declaration of Interdisciplinary Major” form, available online, is used to record the approvals and to advise the Registrar of the College.

Intent to Graduate Form

All candidates for degrees must submit to the Registrar an “Intent to Graduate” form at least two semesters prior to the intended date of graduation.

Commencement

Rhodes requires attendance at the May commencement exercises by all candidates for a degree including candidates whose work was completed in December and candidates whose work will be completed in August. Students who complete degree work in December are included in the graduating class in May of the next calendar year. Rhodes will recognize students who complete degree work in August as members of the preceding May’s graduating class. In order to participate in commencement exercises, August candidates must be within near-expectation of completing the requirements for a degree and have the approval of the Faculty Standards and Standings Committee or the Dean of the Faculty, if the Standards and Standings Committee cannot be convened in a timely manner. The College confers degrees (signified by the date of the degree of the diploma and in official records) at the end of each regular semester (December and May) and in August, but diplomas are awarded only at the May commencement.

Academic Minors

Academic minors are available to students who wish to supplement their major field of study with another academic area, giving both more depth and breadth to their course work. In addition to departmental minors, interdisciplinary minors are available within the established interdisciplinary programs in the curriculum.

Normally, a student is required to complete at least five specified courses in the department in which the minor is selected. At least four of the courses in the minor must be outside the major department or interdisciplinary major requirements, and the same course cannot be used to satisfy the requirements in two different minors. Forms for declaring a minor are available online and should be completed no later than the beginning of the fall semester of the senior year.

A student must earn a grade point average of 2.000 in the courses required for an academic minor in order for the minor to be posted to the final academic record.

Second Degree

A student may earn a second Bachelor’s degree upon earning at least 32 credits beyond the total credits required for the first degree and completion of all requirements for a second major. A student may not earn two Bachelor of Arts degrees or two Bachelor of Science degrees. A student planning to earn a second degree must declare that intention no later than the beginning of the last semester of enrollment. All academic work for both degrees is included in the cumulative grade point average of the double degree recipient.

A Rhodes graduate who wishes to return to the College to earn a second undergraduate degree must earn an additional 32 credits beyond the number of hours earned for the first degree as well as complete the second major. For a returning student, a second cumulative grade point average will be computed using only the additional hours earned for the second degree.

Changes in Degree Requirements

A student may satisfy the requirements for a Rhodes degree as described in any catalogue that has been in effect during the student’s enrollment. Students readmitted to Rhodes may graduate under requirements in effect during the original period of enrollment or by following a program incorporating features of the current catalog, including the number of credits required for graduation, and the earlier degree requirements and approved by the Standards and Standing Committee. Students may not declare a major if it has been dropped from the College’s curriculum, even if the major was available at the time of enrollment. In addition, degree and/or major requirements may have to be modified in order to fit current curricular offerings.

Academic Achievement

The candidate for the degree who attains a cumulative average of 3.9500 in all academic work at the College and a grade point average of 3.9500 in all Rhodes work and all attempted transfer credit combined will be recommended for the degree summa cum laude.

The candidate for the degree who attains a cumulative average of 3.8500 in all academic work at the College and a grade point average of 3.8500 in all Rhodes work and all attempted transfer credit combined will be recommended for the degree magna cum laude.

The candidate for the degree who attains a cumulative average of 3.5000 in all academic work at the College and a grade point average of 3.5000 in all Rhodes work and all attempted transfer credit combined will be recommended for the degree cum laude.

If a student with transfer credit is a candidate for academic achievement recognition, the student must have the grade point average required for academic achievement on all Rhodes work and must have a grade point average for all accepted transfer work and Rhodes work combined which meets the standard for academic achievement.

The major with honors requires special independent study work in the major field during the senior year. The Honors Program is described under Opportunities for Individualized Study. Rhodes does not rank its graduates.

Awarding of Posthumous Degrees

A posthumous degree may be awarded to a deceased undergraduate student who was within 16 credits of the completion of the requirements for graduation or to a deceased graduate student who was within 6 credits of the completion of the requirements for graduation. The student must have been enrolled during the past two regular semesters. The remaining credits would have completed all degree requirements, and the cumulative and major GPA requirements must be met. The appropriate degree may be awarded posthumously on the recommendation of the Dean of the Faculty with the approval of the Faculty Standards and Standing Committee and the President. The student’s transcript will show a notation that the degree was awarded posthumously.

AP/Cambridge Pre-U/IB/OIB Credit Evaluation

A maximum of 32 credits may be earned through Advanced Placement, Cambridge Pre-U, International Baccalaureate, and Option International Baccalaureate examinations. It is the responsibility of the student to have official reports of examination scores in Advanced Placement, Cambridge Pre-U, International Baccalaureate, and/or Option International Baccalaureate sent to Rhodes College. Student copies of score reports are not acceptable for formal evaluation. Receipt of official score reports and formal evaluation of AP/Cambridge Pre-U/IB/OIB score reports must be completed within 10 weeks of the beginning of a student’s first semester of enrollment as a degree-seeking student at Rhodes.

Transfer Students

Students who transfer to Rhodes have their previous college work evaluated for transfer credit upon their acceptance for admission. Credit will be awarded following the guidelines outlined below for the evaluation of academic work for transfer credit. Transfer students are responsible for having final copies of transcripts sent from each institution attended. Official evaluation of transfer credit will not be completed until these final transcripts have been received in the Office of the Registrar.

As degree candidates, transfer students must satisfy all of the degree requirements outlined in this catalogue. Of the total credits required for a Rhodes degree, a minimum fifty percent must be earned at Rhodes and a maximum of fifty percent may be accepted as transfer and Advanced Placement credit.

Transfer credit for students who transfer to Rhodes will be evaluated following these guidelines according to the Foundation requirements:

  1. Courses presented with two or three semester hours or less than six quarter hours will be given the appropriate and corresponding number of credits of transfer credit.
  2. Credit from several courses may be combined to total four or more credits and therefore satisfy a foundation requirement.
  3. A three-credit course may be used to satisfy a foundation requirement if the corresponding course in the department meets that same requirement.
  4. A three-credit course may be used to satisfy a major requirement if the corresponding course in the department meets that same requirement unless specifically disallowed by the department chair.

Transfer Credit

Credit from Other Institutions. Rhodes students may enroll in courses at other colleges and universities and transfer credits to Rhodes. A student who desires to have academic work transferred from another institution must have the work approved in advance by the appropriate academic department chairperson at Rhodes and by the Registrar, acting on behalf of the Education Program Committee. Courses not receiving prior approval may not be accepted for transfer credit at the discretion of the department chair and the Registrar.

Students seeking concurrent enrollment at another institution during a regular semester must have permission from the Standards and Standing Committee prior to registering at the other institution. Concurrent enrollment credits are included in the computation of the total credits permitted in one semester but are not included in the determination of full-time status. Course credit earned at another institution during non-approved concurrent enrollment may not be accepted for transfer credit.

It is the responsibility of the student to ensure that an official transcript from the other institution is forwarded to the Registrar at Rhodes. Final evaluation of transfer work must be completed within twelve (12) weeks of the completion of the course(s) in question. In some departments, a proficiency examination must be passed in order for the transfer credit to be accepted.

Transfer credit may not be used to satisfy a Foundation Requirement. Rhodes students who study abroad in a long-term program that has been pre-approved through the Buckman Center for International Education will normally satisfy the F11 requirement, unless the program has been noted by the Center’s Director as particularly unsuitable for this purpose.

In addition, students may, through appropriate course work, satisfy up to two additional Foundation requirements while abroad (or up to three additional Foundation requirements for a year-long-program). The Director of the Buckman Center will recommend to the Foundations Curriculum Committee, in consultation with the Registrar, and other faculty members as necessary, the appropriateness of the course(s) taken abroad for Foundations credit. This recommendation will be done in accordance with guidelines as provided by the Foundations Curriculum Committee.

Credit from Special Programs. Students wishing to participate in special programs at other collegiate institutions are required to obtain permission and approval in advance from the appropriate academic officer acting on behalf of the Faculty Education Program Committee. In most cases, this approval will come from the Director of the Buckman Center, the Registrar, and the chair of the department at Rhodes in which the coursework will be pursued. The Registrar, in consultation with department chairpersons and the Dean of the Faculty, must approve all work at other institutions in advance of beginning the work. In some cases it may be necessary to postpone approval until course syllabi, papers, and tests are examined.

All credit earned on study abroad programs, exchange programs, and cooperative programs such as Washington Semester is evaluated as transfer credit.

Transfer Credit Guidelines. The following guidelines are used in evaluating academic work from other institutions for transfer credit:

  • To be accepted for credit, each course must be judged comparable in terms of content and quality to a course in the curriculum at Rhodes or it must be judged to be consistent with the liberal arts and science curriculum and of a quality comparable to that expected of courses at Rhodes. Departmental chairpersons make these judgments; in many cases the Registrar of the College can act with the authority of departmental chairpersons. In some departments, a proficiency examination must be passed in order for the transfer credit to be accepted. The chairpersons and the Registrar assign credit toward a degree in such a way as to match comparable work at Rhodes.
  • The course work must be taken on the campus of an accredited college or university or while on a study abroad program approved through the Buckman Center for International Education. Online courses, distance education courses, and dual credit courses taught in a high school are not accepted for transfer credit.
  • Transfer credit may not be used to satisfy a Foundation Requirement with the following exception: Rhodes students who study abroad in a long-term program that has been pre-approved through the Buckman Center for International Education will normally satisfy the F11 requirement, unless the program has been noted by the Center’s Director as particularly unsuitable for this purpose.
    In addition, students may satisfy up to two additional Foundation requirements while abroad (or up to three additional Foundation requirements for a year-long program). The Director of the Buckman Center will recommend to the Foundations Curriculum Committee, in consultation with the Registrar, and other faculty members as necessary, the appropriateness of the course(s) taken abroad for Foundations credit. This recommendation will be done in accordance with guidelines as provided by the Foundations Curriculum Committee.
  • No more than twelve transfer credits may be earned in any one summer.
  • All course work taken at other institutions for which Rhodes receives a transcript will be evaluated for transfer credit, and if pre-approved for transfer credit, will be posted to the student’s record.
  • A maximum of 64 credits or fifty percent of the total credit required for a degree may be accepted towards a Rhodes degree. No student may earn additional transfer credit once that credit limit has been reached.
  • Transfer credits based on a quarter system are converted to the Rhodes credit basis using the formula that one quarter-hour equals two-thirds credit. Fractional transfer credits will be credited.
  • Students earning both transfer credits and Advanced Placement, Cambridge Pre-U, International Baccalaureate, and/or Option International Baccalaureate credits may apply a maximum combined total of fifty percent of the total credit required for a degree to the Rhodes degree. A student with such credit must earn at least fifty percent of the total credit required for a degree in residence at Rhodes.
  • Of the 32 credits earned to qualify for the senior year in residence, a maximum of eight credits may be transfer credit.
  • Transfer credits are not accepted if the grade is D+ or below. Transfer courses taken on a Pass/Fail basis must be passed with a grade of C or better. Confirmation of such a grade must be received by the Registrar before the course will be accepted for transfer credit. Transfer credits are credited to the Rhodes transcript as credits only; they are not computed in or used to determine the grade point average.
  • Courses taken on a college campus prior to matriculation by accepted students, including those which are taken in conjunction with a dual enrollment program at the secondary school level, will be accepted for credit under the same guidelines as stated above, including review by the appropriate department at Rhodes, only if such coursework does not satisfy high school graduation requirements or requirements for admission to Rhodes. Such courses must be taken on a college campus, not in a high school even if taught by collegiate faculty. Credit for such courses must be requested during the summer prior to enrollment at Rhodes. Students who have not graduated from high school who present such courses for transfer credit are not considered transfer students.

The Paul Barret, Jr. Library

Darlene Brooks. Director of the Barret Library. B.A., M.L.I.S., University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
William Short. Associate Director of Library Services. B.A., Rhodes College; M.L.S., George Peabody College. 
Janice Tankersley. Head of Cataloging. B.A., M.S., University of Memphis; M.S.L.S., University of Tennessee, Knoxville 
Amanda Ford. Head of Circulation. B.A., Mississippi State University 
Kenan C. Padgett. Interlibrary Loan & Information Services Librarian. 
B.A. Elon College; M.L.S. University of North Carolina at Greensboro.
Rachel Feinman. Catalog and Collection Development Librarian. B.S., M.L.S., Florida State University.
Greg Paraham. Information Services Librarian. B.A., University of Memphis; M.L.S., Louisiana State University.
Wendy Trenthem. Information Services Librarian. B.A., Rhodes College; M.L.S. University of Texas-Austin.
Jennifer Ott. Information Services Librarian. B.A. University of Tennessee, Knoxville; M.L.I.S, Rutgers University.

Barret Library, a state-of-the-art facility made possible by a major gift from the Paul Barret, Jr. Trust, opened in August, 2005. Paul Barret, Jr., a graduate of the class of 1946 who died in 1999, was the nephew of Mr. and Mrs. A.K. Burrow, who provided for the construction of the 1953 Burrow Library. Barret Library will serve the needs of the college well into the 21st century. The facility, equipped for both wireless and wired technology, features a 24-hour study space and group study rooms, along with facilities for study and library collections. Also included in the Barret Library are areas for peer-tutoring and writing assistance, computer laboratories, the Digital Media Lab and Media Center.

The Library’s collection has been carefully built over a period of years by both the teaching faculty and the library staff to include materials that constitute valuable resources for undergraduate instruction in a liberal arts institution. The research catalog is part of WorldCat, which connects and shares thousands of library catalogs across the country. The interface allows you to see holdings within other libraries as well. The collection is supplemented by online access to a number of databases that support the college's curriculum, including but not limited to, America: History & Life, Cambridge Scientific Abstracts, Eighteenth Century Collections Online, Early English Books Online, EBSCO, ProQuest Complete, the MLA Bibliography, PsycInfo, LEXIS-NEXIS (Academic, Statistical, Congressional, and Environmental), Slavery and Anti-Slavery, Philosopher’s Index, Newsbank, Sociological Abstracts, ATLA Religion Database with ATLASerials, and EconLit. Access is also provided to BioOne, Project Muse and JSTOR electronic journal collections. The library staff is concerned not only with the acquisition, organization, and circulation of the collection, but in providing reference and technology assistance to users, as well as instruction to classes and individuals in effective information literacy.

In addition to the reference and circulating collections there are four special collections: the Rhodes Archives, the Richard Halliburton Collection, the Walter P. Armstrong, Jr. Book Collection and the Shelby Foote Collection, made possible through the generosity of Riea and Steve Lainoff. The Walter P. Armstrong, Jr. Book Collection includes the special items of value added to the library through the years and the collection of first editions of English and American authors, many of them autographed. The Halliburton Collection consists of manuscripts and artifacts relating to the life of this noted travel adventure writer.

The Rhodes Archives consists of publications about Rhodes of an historical nature as well as student honors papers and books written by faculty and alumni. DLynx, the Archives digital repository, provides access to over 18,500 digital Items of historical value and materials created by faculty, staff, and students. These materials include: digital copies of the Sou’wester, the student newspaper, student honor papers, and hundreds of images of student life from past decades. The Sou’wester, the student newspaper, has been digitized from November 1919 to the present date. The Ranking Web of World Repositories” lists DLynx as 113 out of 1646 digital collections in North America which places it in the top 10%.

In order to effect optimum inter-institutional library service to the students, faculty, and staff of the Greater Memphis Consortium, the Barret Library joins the following libraries in making their collections available to each other’s students and faculty: The Christian Brothers University Library, Hollis F. Price Library of LeMoyne-Owen College, Ned W. McWherter Library of the University of Memphis, G. Pillow Lewis Library of the Memphis College of Art, and the Memphis Theological Seminary Library. Students are also entitled to library cards in the Memphis Public Library and Information Center (Central Branch), which is an especially valuable community resource. The Barret Library operates an active and invaluable interlibrary loan service for its faculty and students with libraries outside the Memphis area.

Matters of Record

Administration

Office of the President

Marjorie Hass. President. B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign.
Melody Hokanson Richey. Executive Assistant to the President. B.S., University of Arizona; M.Ed., University of South Carolina.
Patricia C. Fetters. Executive Administrative Assistant. B.S., University of Memphis.
Bailey M. Heldmar. President’s Office Assistant. B.A., Rhodes College.

Athletics, Physical Education and Recreation

Jeffrey M. Cleanthes. Director of Athletics and Head Baseball Coach. B.A., Drew University; M.B.A., Rutgers University.
Matthew V. Dean. Assistant Director of Athletics and Director of the Bryan Campus Life Center. B.S. and M.S., Drake University.
Robert L. Shankman. Assistant Director of Athletics and Coordinator of Cross Country and Track and Field. B.A., Rhodes College; M.Ed., University of Memphis.
Kaitlin E. Harris. Senior Women's Administrator and Head Women’s Volleyball Coach. B.F.A., Saginaw Valley State University.
Charles F. Boehme. Head Swimming and Diving Coach and Aquatics Coordinator. B.A., DePauw University.
Ronald R. Booker. Assistant Football Coach. B.A., Rhodes College.
Tyler H. Cempre. Head Men's Tennis Coach and Assistant Women's Tennis Coach. B.A., Denison University.
Katelyn M. Chambers. Head Women's Soccer Coach. B.A., Loras College; M.S., Misericordia University.
Michael T. Clary. Head Women’s Golf Coach and Athletic Recruiter. B.A., Rhodes College.
Breanna N. Cugliari. Associate Head Athletic Trainer. B.S., University of Toledo; M.S., Ohio University; AT, ATC.
Samantha P. Davidson.  Assistant Women’s Basketball Coach. B.S., Birmingham-Southern College; M.S., University of Tennessee at Knoxville.
Michael E. DeGeorge. Head Men’s Basketball Coach and Assistant Coordinator of Recreational Services. B.A., Monmouth College; M.A., Viterbo University.
Christopher N. DiLella. Assistant Football Coach. B.A., King’s College; M.A., Castleton State College.
Brandon T. Dworak. Assistant Cross Country and Track & Field Coach. B.A., University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point; M.A., Boise State University.
Jacob D. Garbuzinski. Assistant Baseball Coach and Pitching Coach. B.S., Christian Brothers University.
Andrew B. Gibson. Head Athletic Trainer. B.S., University of Memphis; M.S., Murray State University; ATC, LAT, CSCS, PES, CES.
Kaitlyn S. Hafdell. Assistant Women’s Lacrosse Coach. B.S., Slippery Rock University of Pennsylvania.
James C. Hill. Sports Information Coordinator. B.B.A., Millsaps College.
Peter H. Jennings. Assistant Football Coach. B.S., Illinois College; M.S., Walden University.
Lindsay M. Kasten. Head Field Hockey Coach and Coordinator of Athletic Facilities. B.S., M.A., Sacred Heart University.
Meghan S. Keelan. Head Women’s Lacrosse Coach and Fitness Room Supervisor. B.A., University of Maryland, Baltimore County; M.B.A., Shepherd University.
Matthew C. Lamb. Assistant Men's Soccer Coach. B.A., University of Mary Washington.
Susan M. Lawless. Assistant Athletic Trainer. B.S., Grand Valley State University; M.S., Lamar University.
Elizabeth B. Leitch. Assistant Athletic Trainer. B.A., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.Ed., University of Virginia.
Bradley J. Linares. Assistant Football Coach. B.S., Illinois College; M.S.S., U.S. Sports Academy.
Andy J. Marcinko. Head Men’s Soccer Coach and Compliance Director. B.S., Virginia Tech University; M.S., University of North Texas.
Shayni R. Paul. Assistant Women’s Soccer Coach. B.S., Marian University; M.B.A., Capital University.
Matthew R. Peterson. Assistant Men’s Basketball Coach. B.S., Illinois State University.
Jeremy R. Phelps. Assistant Men’s Lacrosse Coach. B.S., Winthrop University; M.Ed., Goucher College.
James M. Ryan. Head Football Coach. B.S., Colorado State University; M.S., University of Central Missouri.
Robert D. Schrier. Associate Head Baseball Coach and Coordinator of Outdoor Facilities. B.A., Rhodes College.
Michael B. Sheppard. Assistant Swimming and Diving Coach. B.A., University of Arizona.
Lauren A. Sumski. Head Women’s Basketball Coach and Assistant Coordinator of Athletic Facilities. B.S., Rhodes College; M.A., Union University.
Jennifer L. Tafro. Assistant Field Hockey Coach. B.A., Montclair State University; M.Ed., Frostburg State University.
Jennifer L. Tinnell. Head Women’s Tennis Coach and Assistant Men’s Tennis Coach. B.A., M.B.A., Berry College.
Brian M. Vaughn. Assistant Football Coach. B.S., Illinois College.
J. Lucas Wagner. Head Softball Coach and Coordinator of Intramurals and Recreation Services. B.A., Wittenberg.
J. David Zazzaro. Head Men’s Lacrosse Coach and Fitness Room Supervisor. B.A., Drew University; M.B.A., Regis University.
 

Office of Academic Affairs

Milton C. Moreland. Vice President for Academic Affairs and Dean of the Faculty. B.A., University of Memphis; M.A., Ph.D., Claremont Graduate University.
Michelle M. Mattson.  Associate Dean of Academic Affairs. B.A., University of Minnesota; M.A., Ph.D., Stanford University.
Brian W. Shaffer. Associate Dean of Academic Affairs. B.A., Washington University; Ph.D., University of Iowa.
Noelle Chaddock. Associate Dean of Academic Affairs for Diversity and Inclusion. B.S., M.A., Ph.D., Binghamton University.
Tiffany B. Cox. Title IX Coordinator. B.S., University of Tennessee at Chattanooga; J.D., University of Memphis.
Brian Braskich. Director of Student Learning Assessment. B.A., University of Iowa; M.A., United Theological Seminary of the Twin Cities.
Kathy D. Evans. Director of Teacher Licensure and Field Placements. B.A., Wheaton College; M.S., George Peabody College; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University.
Charles L. Hughes. Director of the Memphis Center. B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Wisconsin at Madison.
Charles M. Snyder. Director of Health Professions Advising. B.A., Ed.M., M.P.H., Ph.D., Washington State University.
April L. Allen. Administrative Assistant II. B.B.A., Lambuth University; M.B.A., University of Memphis.
Leah A. Ford. Administrative Assistant II. B.A., Rhodes College.
Judith A. Pierce. Administrative Assistant II.

Mike Curb Institute for Music

John B. Bass. Director. B.M., University of Southern Mississippi; M.M., Ph.D., University of Memphis.

Buckman Center for International Education

J. Barron Boyd. Director of International Programs. B.A., Rhodes College; M.A., Ph.D., University of South Carolina.
Erin R. Hillis. Associate Director of International Programs. B.A., M.A., Ph.D., University of Memphis.

Office of the Registrar

DeAnna S. Adams. Registrar. B.A., Rhodes College; M.B.A., Union University.

Office of European Studies

Sally Dormer. Dean. B.A., University of Durham; M.A., Ph.D., Courtauld Institute of Art, University of London.
Stevens Anderson. Associate Dean. B.A., University of the South; M.A., University of Virginia.
Mary Allie Baldwin. Part-time Administrative Assistant. B.A., Rhodes College.

Academic Staff

Jacqueline S. Baker. Departmental Assistant, Political Science.
Stephanie N. Cage. Departmental Assistant, Religious Studies, Art and Philosophy. A.A.S., Southwest Tennessee Community College; B.B.A., M.A., University of Memphis.
Kevin J. Collier. Performing Arts Coordinator, McCoy Theatre. B.A., Rhodes College.
Dianne E. Cox. Departmental Assistant, Biology.
Glen W. Davis. Technical Associate, Physics. B.S., University of Memphis; M.S., Murray State University.
Linda C. Gibson. Departmental Assistant, Economics, Commerce and Business. B.A., Vanderbilt University; M.L.S., George Peabody College.
Jeff R. Goode. Chemistry Storeroom and Laboratory Manager, Chemistry. B.S., University of Memphis.
K. Michelle Hammontree. Departmental Assistant, Mathematics and Computer Science. B.A., University of Southern Indiana, Evansville.
Sean L. Hardwick. Departmental Assistant, Anthropology, Sociology and Psychology. B.S., Northwestern University.
Sarah R. Hasty. Laboratory Supervisor and Biological Safety Officer, Biology. B.S., Louisiana State University; M.S., University of Memphis.
Carol E. Kelley. Departmental Assistant, History. B.A., Christian Brothers University.
Rosanna P. Meindl. Part-time Visual Resources Curator, Art. B.A., Lewis and Clark College; M.A., University of Oregon.
Karen L. Mosley. Instrument Technician and Chemical Safety Officer, Chemistry. B.S., M.S., University of Memphis.
Victor O. Obadina. Physics Instructional Support Specialist, Physics. B.A., Fisk University; M.S., Alabama A&M University.
Erika Pope. Musical Arts Coordinator, Music. B.A., Henderson State University.
Anna R. Smith. Director of Mock Trial Program, Political Science. B.A., Rhodes College; J.D., Duke University School of Law.
Anna M. Snickenberger. Administrative Assistant I, Memphis Center and Urban Studies. B.A., Rhodes College.
Kimberly A. Stevenson. Departmental Assistant, International Studies. B.S., University of Memphis.
Christy M. Waldkirch. Departmental Assistant, Modern Languages and Literatures and Greek and Roman Studies.
Lorie W. Yearwood. Departmental Assistant, English. A.A.S., State Technical Institute at Memphis.
 

Office of Student Affairs

Carol E. Casey. Dean of Students. B.A., Wittenberg University; M.S., Miami University.
Alicia Golston. Associate Dean of Students. B.A., M.A., University of Memphis; Ed.D., Western Kentucky University.
Meredith E. Davis. Associate Dean of Students for Inclusion and Involvement. B.A., St. Mary’s College of Maryland; M.A., University of Maryland; Ph.D., Rutgers, The State Univeristy of New Jersey.
Christine M. Fox. Director of Community Standards. B.A., Furman University.
Keith E. Hembree. Director of Student Activities. B.S., University of Southern Mississippi; M.S., Mississippi State University. 
Ira Lawson. Director of Student Leadership. B.S., M.A., East Carolina University.
Daniel A. Schrader. Director of New Student Programs. B.S., Rhodes College.
Melissa R. Campbell. Assistant Director of Student Academic Support. B.S., Middle Tennessee State university; M.S., Texas A&M University.
Jana L. Hayes. Administrative Assistant II. B.A., Harding University; M.S., Arkansas State University.
Elizabeth N. Hvasta. Administrative Assistant II. B.S., University of Alabama.

Office of Campus Safety

S. Isac Sloas. Director of Campus Safety. A.A.S., B.S., Arkansas State University; M.S., Albany State University.
Robert J. Seals. Assistant Director of Campus Safety. B.A., Harvard; M.A., University of Alabama.
Johnny R. Austin. Shift Commander.
K. Lynn Barnett. Shift Commander.
Jennifer E. Logan. Campus Safety Coordinator. B.A., Howard University.

Office of Chaplain and Community Service

Shannon Hoffman. Director of the Bonner Center. B.A., Michigan State University; M.Ed., Vanderbilt University.
Lucy W. Webb. Part-time Chaplain. B.A., Rhodes College; M.Div., Columbia Theological Seminary.

Office of Counseling and Student Development Center

Robert B. Dove. Director of Student Counseling. B.A., Tulane University; M.S., Smith College; L.C.S.W.
Pamela M. Detrie. Associate Director of Student Counseling. B.S., University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill; M.Ed., Clemson University; Ph.D., University of Memphis. 
Chenobia Webster. Assistant Director of Student Counseling. B.A., University of Memphis; M.S., D.S.W., University of Tennessee; L.C.S.W.
Haley G. Alsaffar. Clinical Counselor. B.S., James Madison University; B.S., University of Memphis; N.C.C., L.P.C.-M.H.S.P.

Office of Disability Services

Melissa B. Butler. Director of Student Disability Services. B.S., University of Washington; M.S., University of Memphis.

Office of Health Services

Patricia J. Sterba. Director of Health Services. R.N., South Chicago Community Hospital School of Nursing, B.S.N., St. Francis College.
Karen M. Barella. Staff Nurse – RN. A.S.N., Housatonic Community College; R.N., Bridgeport Hospital School of Nursing.              
Jane M. Marquez. Staff Nurse – LPN. L.P.N., Vincennes University.
Kelfey A. Williams. Administrative Assistant I.

Office of Residential Life

Marianne C. Luther. Director of Residence Life. B.S., Ohio State University; M.Ed., Kent State University.
Kimberlee M. Small. Associate Director of Residence Life. B.A., Mary Baldwin College; M.A., Shepherd University.
Antoinette J. Ferrell. Assistant Director of Residence Life. B.A., Mississippi State University; M.P.A., Arkansas State University.

Rhodes Express

Jessica N. Rodriguez. Rhodes Express Supervisor. B.S., Sam Houston State University.
Megan L. Beamer. Service Specialist. B.S.S., Ohio University.
Reida B. Benson. Service Specialist. B.B.A., Mississippi State University.
 

Office of External Programs

Russell T. Wigginton. Vice President for External Programs. B.A., Rhodes College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Illinois.
Suzanne L. Bonefas. Director of Special Projects. B.A., Austin College; M.A., Ph.D., University of Texas at Austin.
Tiffany M. Ford. Grants and Foundations Manager. B.A., Rhodes College; B.A., Christian Brothers University; M.S., University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
Dorothy A. Cox. Learning Corridor Community Liaison.
Angela G. Fletcher. Administrative Assistant II.

Office of Career Services

Sandra George Tracy. Director of Career Services. B.A., Purdue University; M.A., Bowling Green State University.
Brittney A. Jackson. Assistant Director of Career Services. B.S., University of Tennessee - Knoxville; M.S., University of Memphis.
Daniel C. Vanaman. Assistant Director of Career Services. B.A., Rhodes College; M.A., Christian Brother’s University.
 

Office of Development

Jennifer Goodloe Wade. Vice President for Development. B.S., University of Tennessee, Knoxville; M.Ed., Vanderbilt University.
Amanda G. Tamburrino. Senior Director of Development. B.A., Rhodes College.
Nichole E. Soule’. Director of Golden Lynx Programs. B.A., Rhodes College; J.D., University of Memphis.
James B. Duncan. Director of Athletic Giving and Senior Development Officer. B.S., University of Kansas.
J. Knight Champion. Senior Development Officer. B.A., Rhodes College; J.D., University of Alabama.
Michael A. Palazzolo. Senior Development Officer. B.A., Rhodes College.
P. Owen McGuire. Director of Digital Content. B.A., M.B.A., Mississippi State University.
Kristen H. Hunt. Administrative Assistant II. B.S., University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
Elizabeth H. Love. Administrative Assistant I.

Office of Advancement Services

Stephanie L. Chockley. Director of Advancement Services. B.A., Rhodes College.
DeSonya D. Tyms. Assistant Director of Advancement Services. B.A., Rhodes College.
Leslie K. Adams. Advancement Services Coordinator. B.A., University of Memphis.
Leslie B. Crowe. Development Assistant. B.L.S., University of Memphis.

Office of Alumni Relations

Tracy V. Patterson. Director of Alumni Relations. B.A., Rhodes College; J.D., University of Memphis.
Caitlin M. Dempsey. Assistant Director of Alumni Relations. B.A., Rhodes College.
Rebecca F. Johnston. Administrative Assistant I. B.A., University of Arkansas.

Office of Annual Giving

Kerry A. Connors. Director of Annual Giving. B.A., Marist College.
Darren L. Thomas. G.O.L.D. (Graduates of the Last Decade) Coordinator. B.A., Rhodes College.
Jacquelyn S. Carney. Administrative Assistant I.

Office of College Events

H. Nicole Moore. Senior Director of College Events and Leadership Projects. B.B.A., Northeast Louisiana University.
Kimberly S. Bennett. Director of College Events. B.A., University of Memphis.
Shamikia M. Adkins. Manager of Campus Scheduling. B.A., Howard University.
 

Office of Finance and Business Affairs

J. Kyle Webb. Vice President for Finance and Business Affairs. B.A., Rhodes College; C.P.A.

Office of Finance

Wanda L. Jones. Senior Associate Comptroller and Director of Accounting and Payroll. B.S., Christian Brothers University; M.S., Rhodes College.
Kathleen B. Cates. Associate Comptroller and Director of Accounting Information Systems. B.B.A., University of Memphis; C.P.A.
Jennifer L. Flowers. Assistant Director of Accounting Information Systems. B.S., Christian Brothers University.
Tina L. NeSmith. Payroll Manager.
Bama M. Strickland. Accounts Payable Manager. B.S., Mississippi State University.
Amy R. Wilson. Staff Accountant III. B.B.A., M.M., University of Memphis; C.P.A. (inactive).
Gabriela Mackiw. Accounting and Finance Analyst. B.A., Rhodes College.

Office of the Bursar

Richard F. Huddleston. Bursar. B.A., Rhodes College.

Office of Physical Plant

Brian E. Foshee. Director of Physical Plant and Chief Environmental Safety Compliance Officer. B.S., Christian Brothers University.
Timothy H. Lucas. Associate Director of Physical Plant. B.A., University of Memphis.
Jeffrey A. McClain. Superintendent of Maintenance.
W. Gregory Jones. Assistant Superintendent of Maintenance.
Kevin J. Sackett. Superintendent of Grounds. B.A., University of Texas at San Antonio.
Jesse Garner. Assistant Superintendent of Grounds. 
L. Mark Fleming . Superintendent of Housekeeping.
Linda B. Burks. Assistant Superintendent of Housekeeping.
Angelo C. Johnson. Manager of Special Services.
Amy J. Radford. Business Manager.
Debbie Newsom. Administrative Assistant I.

Office of Human Resources

Claire Revels Shapiro. Chief Human Resources Officer. B.S., M.B.A., Louisiana State University; SPHR, CCP, SHRM-SCP, ATIXA.
Lori Von Bokel-Amin. Associate Director of Human Resources. B.S., Southern Illinois University; SPHR.
Martha A. McGeachy. Benefits Services Manager. B.A., Rhodes College; J.D., University of Memphis.
Leigh A. Powell. Human Resources Business Systems Analyst. B.A., University of Memphis, PHR, SHRM-CP.
Margaret H. Plunket. Wellness and Work Life Services Manager.

 

Office of Information Services

Robert M. Johnson, Jr. Vice President for Student and Information Services. M.A. and Ph.D., Vanderbilt University.
Marci Hendrix. Administrative Assistant II. B.A., Rhodes College.

Office of Institutional Research

Dawn Clement Cornies. Director of Institutional Research. B.S., M.B.A., University of Tennessee, Martin.

Information Technology Services

Richard T. Trenthem, Jr. Director of Information Technology Services. B.A., Rhodes College; M.L.I.S., University of Texas.
Stacy S. Pennington. Associate Director for Systems and Networks. B.A., Rhodes College.
Arthur Rosario. System Administrator. A.A.S., Florida Career College.
Douglas G. Walker. System Administrator. A.A.S., State Technical Institute, Memphis.
Jermaine S. Pickens. Application Specialist. B.S., Alabama A&M University.
Tierney T. Jackson. Database Analyst. B.S., Rhodes College; M.B.A., University of Memphis.
Edward A. Trouy. Network and Computer Engineer. A.E.T., State Technical Institute, Memphis.
Caley A. Foreman. Senior Desktop Support Specialist. B.A., Mississippi State University.
S. Lance Kimbrell. Senior Desktop Support Specialist. A.A.S., Mississippi Delta Community College.
Corey A. Phillips. Multimedia Support Manager. B.A., University of Mississippi.

Paul Barret Jr. Library

Darlene Brooks. Director of Barret Library. B.A. and M.L.I.S., University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
William M. Short. Associate Director of Library Services. B.A., Rhodes College; M.L.S., George Peabody College. Curator for the Jessie L. Clough Art Memorial for Teaching.
Janice G. Tankersley. Head of Cataloging. B.A. and M.S., University of Memphis; M.S.L.S., University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
Rachel Feinman. Catalog and Collection Development Librarian. B.S. and M.L.S., Florida State University.
Kenan Padgett. Interlibrary Loan and Information Services Librarian. B.A., Elon College; M.L.S., University of North Carolina at Greensboro.
Jennifer B. Ott. Information Services Librarian. B.A., University of Tennessee-Knoxville; M.L.I.S., Rutgers University.
Gregory J. Paraham. Information Services Librarian. B.A., University of Memphis; M.L.S., Louisiana State University.
Wendy L. Trenthem. Information Services Librarian. B.A.. Rhodes College; M.L.I.S., University of Texas at Austin.
Jessica N. Newman. Digital Preservation and Scholarship Project Manager. B.S., Rhodes College; M.S.I.S., University of Tennessee, Knoxville.
Amanda Ford. Head of Circulation. B.A., Mississippi State University.
Caitlin E. Gewin. Circulation Supervisor. B.A., Rhodes College.
 

Office of Enrollment and Communications

J. Carey Thompson. Vice President for Enrollment and Communications and Dean of Admission. B.A., Furman University; M.Ed., Vanderbilt University.
Kimberly J. Wamble. Administrative Assistant II. B.S., University of Phoenix.

Office of Admission

Jeff Norris. Director of Admission and Data Services. B.S.B.A., University of Arkansas.
Katie E. Frink. Associate Director of Admission. B.A., Rhodes College.
Lauren B. Sefton. Associate Director of Admission. B.A., Rhodes College.
Megan A. Starling. Associate Director of Admission. B.A., Rhodes College; M.S., Kennesaw State University.
Benjamin B. Wescott. Associate Director of Admission. B.A., Roanoke College.
Ali M. Hamilton. Senior Assistant Director of Admission. B.A., Centre College; M.Ed., University of Georgia.
Nyasha L. Hill. Assistant Director of Admission. B.A., Louisiana State University.
Joseph N. Thibeault. Assistant Director of Admission. B.A., Rhodes College.
Kristin A. Croone. Campus Visit Service Coordinator. B.A., Vanderbilt University; J.D., Case Western Reserve University.
Jo L. Gibbons. Campus Visit Data Coordinator.

Office of Communications

Vacant. Director of Communications.
D. Lynn Conlee. Associate Director of Communications/Editor of Rhodes Magazine. A.A., Northwest Mississippi Community College; B.S., Delta State University; M.F.A., University of Memphis.
Justin W. McGregor. Associate Director of Communications for Digital Services. B.S., Middle Tennessee State University.
Jana D. Files. Assistant Director of Communications. B.A., Rhodes College.
Charles W. Kenny. Assistant Director of Communications. B.F.A., University of Tennessee at Knoxville.
Dionne R. Chalmers. Media Relations Manager. B.A. and M.A., University of Memphis.
Matthew R. Cowgur. Web/Content Management System Developer. B.S., Taylor University.
Larry D. Ahokas. Graphic Designer. B.M.E., University of Nebraska.
Robert C. Shatzer. Graphic Designer. B.F.A., University of Memphis; M.F.A., Memphis College of Art.
Nicholas L. Wallace. Interactive Technology Manager. A.S., B.S., Arkansas State University.

Office of Data Services

Harold E. Robinson. Associate Director of Data Services. B.S., University of Memphis.
Jacob L. Church. Business Systems Analyst. B.A., Rhodes College.
Elisha J. Vego. Business Systems Analyst. B.S., University of Memphis.
Rachel A. Strug. Data and Communications Specialist. B.A., Rhodes College.

Office of Financial Aid

Michael D. Morgan. Director of Financial Aid. B.S., University of Kentucky. 
Stacey L. Duncan. Assistant Director of Financial Aid. B.A., University of Memphis.
Heather C. Walter. Assistant Director of Financial Aid. A.A., Pensacola Junior College; B.S., Park University.

The Bookstore (Managed by Follett Higher Education Group)

Shalinda Barthelmy. Store Manager. B.A., University of Memphis.
Betty A. Mohler. Assistant Store Manager. B.A., Christian Brothers University.
Jennifer Strickland. Course Materials. B.A., Rhodes College.
Susan Fagan. Sales Associate. B.A., Kent State.
Rose Mary O’Kelley. Sales Associate. B.A., Christian Brothers University.
Tara O'Quinn. Sales Associate. B.A., Tennessee State University.
Teresa Potter. Sales Associate. B.S., Memphis State University.
Elijah Smith. Sales Associate.
Turner Williams. Sales Associate. B.S., Jackson State University.
Kyanna Young. Student, Rhodes College.

 

College Sponsored Lecture Series

The academic life of Rhodes is enhanced considerably by annual sponsored programs which make it possible for authorities in various fields of study to come to the College and to participate in a variety of events with faculty and students.

The Lillian and Morrie Moss Endowment for the Visual Arts

Established in 1984, the Moss Endowment brings to the College each year guest lecturers and visiting scholars in the fields of art, art history, and criticism for the benefit of Rhodes students and the Memphis community. This series has attracted national attention for its roster of speakers selected from the world's leading experts in the fields of art and art history.

The Peyton Nalle Rhodes Physics Lecture Series

Annually since 1984, the Peyton N. Rhodes Physics Lecture Series has brought to the campus and community experts in the physical sciences and astronomy. Endowed by friends of the former physics professor, president and namesake of the College, the lecture series has acquainted students, faculty, and friends with new developments and changing interpretations of the physical world.

James F. Ruffin Lecture in the Fine Arts

Established in 2001, the James F. Ruffin Lecture in the Fine Arts brings to campus speakers and symposia focused on the visual arts. The lectures are funded by a 1999 bequest from the late James F. Ruffin, founder and operator of Ruffin's Import and Interiors.

The Springfield Music Lectures

The Springfield Music Lectures were established in 1991 by a bequest from the late John Murry Springfield, '51. Each year an outstanding musicologist, researcher, music historian or music theorist presents both formal and informal lectures that foster an increased appreciation of music as an academic discipline. These lectures are open to the public as well as to the Rhodes community.

The Mike Curb Concert Series

The Mike Curb Institute for Music at Rhodes College was founded in 2006 through a generous gift from the Mike Curb Family Foundation. Through the Curb Concert Series, the Institute brings significant musicians associated with Memphis and the surrounding region to campus for concerts and interactions with the Rhodes community. All concerts are free and open to the general public.

Corporation and Board of Trustees

Legal Title - Rhodes College

Board of Trustees

William J. Michaelcheck, Chair.
Morgan Carrington Fowler, Vice Chair.
Maria Farahani, Secretary.
William E. Troutt, President, ex officio.

Meri Armour. M.S.N./M.B.A. Memphis, Tennessee. President and CEO, Le Bonheur Children’s Hospital.
John J. Barker. B.A.,New Canaan, Connecticut. Managing Director, Neuberger Berman.
Stratton H. Bull. B.A., J.D. Natchez, Mississippi. Retired. Attorney, Phelps Dunbar.
Deborah Legg Craddock. B.A. Memphis, Tennessee. Vice President of Trading, Southeastern Asset Management, Inc.
Rogers L. Crain. B.A., J.D. Houston, Texas. Attorney, R. Lacy Services, Ltd.
Margaret Thomas Crosby. B.A. Memphis, Tennessee. Principal, PeopleCap Advisors.
Maria Farahani. B.A. Austin, Texas. Co-owner, Faracafe Coffee Company.
Morgan Carrington Fowler. B.A. Ph.D. Chair, Svalbard Global Seed Vault; Former Executive Director, Global Crop Diversity Trust.
Veronica Lawson Gunn. B.A., M.D. Whitefish Bay, Wisconsin. Vice President, Children’s Hospital and Health.
Daniel B. Hatzenbuehler. B.A., J.D. Memphis, Tennessee. Chairman and CEO, E. Ritter and Company.
Frances C. Henkel. B.A., M.B.A. Chicago, Illinois. Managing Director, J.P. Morgan.
R. Davis Howe. B.A. Memphis, Tennessee. Managing Director and CEO, Wolf River Capital LLC.
Steven R. Lainoff. B.A., L.L.M., J.D. McLean, Virginia. Principal-in-Charge, KPMG LLP’s Washington National Tax Practice.
William J. Michaelcheck. B.A., M.B.A. New York, New York. Chairman, Mariner Investment Group, Inc.
Ryan D. Mire. B.S., M.D. Franklin, Tennessee. Physician, St. Thomas Hospital.
Johnny B. Moore, Jr. B.A. Memphis, Tennessee. President and CEO, SunTrust Bank.
Vicki R. Palmer. B.A., M.B.A. Atlanta, Georgia. President, The Palmer Group.
Elizabeth R. Pearce. B.A., M.B.A. Atlanta, Georgia. Associate Campaign Director, Coxe Curry and Associates.
Gregory A. Peters. B.A. Austin, Texas. President & CEO, Zilliant Inc.
Randall R. Rhea. B.A., M.D. Roanoke, Virginia. Managing Partner, Carilion Family Medicine-Parkway Physicians.
William C. Rhodes. B.A., M.B.A. Memphis, Tennessee. President and CEO, Autozone, Inc.
Charles W. Robertson, Jr. B.S., PhD. Rockland, Delaware. Chief Technical Consultant, NanoDrop Technologies, LLC.
W. Reid Sanders. B.A. Memphis, Tennessee. Retired Executive Vice President, Southeastern Asset Management; President of Sanders Investment Company and Sanders Properties. 
Charlaine Harris Schulz. B.A. Granbury, Texas. Author.
Robert R. Waller. M.D. Memphis, Tennessee. President Emeritus and CEO, The Mayo Clinic.

Trustees Emeriti

Dunbar Abston, Jr. A.B., M.B.A., M.Phil. Memphis, Tennessee. President and Owner, Tract-O-Land Plantation and Abston Management Company; Partner, Abston Farms and AbstonNorfleet Realty Company.
Bruce E. Campbell, Jr. B.A., M.B.A. Memphis, Tennessee. Chairman of the Executive Committee and Chairman Emeritus of the Board, National Commerce Bancorporation.
Kenneth F. Clark, Jr. B.A., M.B.A., LL.B. Memphis, Tennessee. Counsel, Wyatt, Tarrant & Combs.
J. Lester Crain, Jr. B.A., LL.B. Memphis, Tennessee. Private Investor.
Lewis Donelson. B.A., LL.B. Memphis, Tennessee. Founder and Senior Partner, Baker, Donelson, Bearman, Caldwell and Berkowitz, P.C.
W. Neely Mallory, Jr. B.A. Memphis, Tennessee. President and Chief Executive Officer, The Mallory Group Inc.; Managing Partner, Mallory Farms; Chairman of EWR.
John B. Maxwell, Jr. B.A., J.D. Memphis, Tennessee. Former Counsel, Apperson, Crump, Duzane and Maxwell. 
Frank M. Mitchener, Jr. B.S. Sumner, Mississippi. President, Mitchener Planting Company.
Wayne W. Pyeatt. B.S. Memphis, Tennessee. Chairman Emeritus of the Board and President, National Bank of Commerce.
Elizabeth LeMaster Simpson. B.A. Memphis, Tennessee.

New Council of Emeriti Trustees

James H. Barton. A.B., J.D. Memphis, Tennessee. President and Treasurer, BArton Group, Inc.
Robert H. Buckman. B.S., M.B.A. Memphis, Tennessee. Chairman of the Executive Committee of the Board of Directors at Bulab Holdings, Inc.                                                                                                                                                                                                                                                              C. Williams Butler, III. B.A. Memphis, Tennessee. Retired First Vice President and Manager of the Commodity-International Division, SunTrust Bank                                                                                                                                                                                                                                      Joe M. Duncan. B.A., LL.B. Memphis, Tenessee. Partner, Burch, Porter and Johnson.                                                                                         William E. Evans. B.Sc., Pharm.D. Memphis, Tennessee. Endowed Chair in Pharmacogenomics, St. Jude Chilren's Research Hospital.  Phillip H. McNeill, Sr. B.S., J.D. Memphis, Tennessee. Chairman of the Board, Equity Inns, Inc. and president of McNeill Investment Co. Vicki G. Palmer. B.A., M.B.A, Atlanta, Georgia. Retired Executive Vice-President, Coca-Cola Enterprises, Inc.                                                Spence L. Wilson. B.A., M.B.A. Memphis, Tennessee. President, Kemmons Wilson, Inc.

Executive Committee

William J. Michaelcheck, Chair
Arthur W. Rollins, Vice Chair
Maria Farahani, Secretary
William E. Troutt, President of the College, ex officio
Deborah L. Craddock
Steven R. Lainoff
Randall R. Rhea
W. Reid Sanders
Robert R. Waller

 

Emeriti

Mary Ross Burkhart. Professor Emerita of English since 1982. B.A., Mary Washington College of the University of Virginia; M.A., University of Tennessee.
Angelo Margaris. Professor Emeritus of Mathematics since 1983. B.E.E., Cornell University; M.A., Syracuse University; Ph.D., Cornell University.
Jack R. Conrad. Professor Emeritus of Anthropology since 1984. A.B. and M.A., Emory University; Ph.D., Duke University.
Richard C. Wood. Professor Emeritus of English since 1988. B.A., Rhodes; M.A., Columbia University.
William L. Daniels. Professor Emeritus of English since 1990. B.A. and M.A., Vanderbilt University; Ph.D., Harvard University.
Frederic R. Stauffer. Professor Emeritus of Physics since 1990. B.S. and M.S., Bucknell University.
Johann Bruhwiler. Professor Emeritus of German since 1991. B.A., Carleton University (Canada); M.A. and Ph.D., University of Cincinnati.
Jack H. Taylor. Professor Emeritus of Physics since 1992. B.S., Rhodes College; Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University.
Robert G. Patterson. Professor Emeritus of Religious Studies since 1993. B.A., Washington and Lee University; B.D., Union Theological Seminary (Virginia); Ph.D., Yale University.
Lawrence K. Anthony. Professor Emeritus of Art since 1995. B.A., Washington and Lee University; M.F.A., University of Georgia.
Milton P. Brown, Jr. Professor Emeritus of Religious Studies since 1995. A.B., Birmingham-Southern College; B.D., Louisville Presbyterian Theological Seminary; Ph.D., Duke University.
Rebecca Sue Legge. Professor Emerita of Business Administration since 1995. B.B.A., M.B.A. and Ph.D., University of Mississippi.
Herbert W. Smith. Professor Emeritus of Psychology since 1995. B.A. and M.A., East Texas State University; Ph.D., Florida State University.
G. Kenneth Williams. Professor Emeritus of Mathematics and Computer Science since 1995. B.A.E. and M.A., University of Kentucky; Ph.D., University of Virginia.
F. Thomas Cloar. Professor Emeritus of Psychology since 1996. B.A., Rhodes College; M.A., University of Memphis; Ph.D., University of Alabama.
James W. Jobes, Jr. Professor Emeritus of Philosophy since 1996. B.A., St. John’s College; Ph.D., University of Virginia.
Donald W. Tucker. Professor Emeritus of Spanish since 1998. B.S., Davidson College; M.A. and Ph.D., University of North Carolina.
Edward A. Barnhardt. Associate Professor Emeritus of Physics since 1999. B.S., Rhodes College; M.S., Vanderbilt University.
James H. Daughdrill, Jr. President Emeritus since 1999. B.A., Emory University; M. Div., Columbia Theological Seminary; D.D., Davidson College.
Charles C. Orvis. Professor Emeritus of Economics since 2000. B.A., State University at Northridge, California; Ph.D., University of Minnesota.
Bobby R. Jones. Professor Emeritus of Biology since 2001. B.S., University of Arkansas; Ph.D., University of Missouri.
William L. Lacy. Professor Emeritus of Philosophy since 2001. B.A., Rhodes College; Ph.D., University of Virginia.
Robert M. MacQueen. Professor Emeritus of Physics since 2001. B.S., Rhodes College; Ph.D., The Johns Hopkins University.
F. Michael McLain. Professor Emeritus of Religious Studies since 2003. B.A., DePauw University; B.D., Yale Divinity School; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University.
Carolyn P. Schriber. Professor Emerita of History since 2004. B.S., Kent State University; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Colorado.
John L. Streete. Professor Emeritus of Physics since 2004. B.S., Rhodes College; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Florida.
Douglas W. Hatfield. Professor Emeritus of History since 2005. B.A. Baylor University; M.A. and Ph.D., University of Kentucky.
Robert G. Mortimer. Professor Emeritus of Chemistry since 2005. B.S. and M.S. Utah State University; Ph.D., California Institute of Technology.
Richard A. Batey. Professor Emeritus of Religious Studies since 2006. B.A., David Lipscomb College; B.D. and Ph.D., Vanderbilt University.
Horst R. Dinkelacker. Professor Emeritus of German since 2006. Staatsexamen, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen; Ph. D., Vanderbilt University
Diane M. Clark. Associate Professor Emerita of Music since 2006. B.M., Rhodes College; M.M., Indiana University; D.A., University of Mississippi.
James C. Lanier. Professor Emeritus of History since 2006. B.A., Stetson University; M.A. and Ph.D., Emory University.
Robert R. Llewellyn. Associate Professor Emeritus of Philosophy since 2006. B.A., Davidson College; M.A. and Ph.D., Vanderbilt University.
Marshall E. McMahon. Professor Emeritus of Economics and Business Administration since 2007. B.A., University of the South; Ph.D., Vanderbilt University.
J. Peter Ekstrom. Associate Professor Emeritus of Anthropology and Sociology since 2007. B.A., Beloit College; M.A. The American University; Ph.D., University of Illinois.
James. M. Vest. Professor Emeritus of French since 2009. A.B., Davidson College; M.A. and Ph.D., Duke University. 
Deborah N. Pittman. Associate Professor Emerita of Economics and Business since 2011. B.A. Rhodes College; M.S. University of Memphis; Ph.D. University of Memphis.
John F. Copper. Distinguished Professor Emeritus of International Studies since 2012. B.A. University of Nebraska; M.A. University of Hawaii; Ph.D. University of South Carolina.
Gail P. C. Streete. Professor Emerita of Religious Studies since 2012. B.A., M.A., and M.L.S. SUNY at Buffalo; M. Phil. and Ph.D. Drew University.
Robert J. Strandburg. Professor Emeritus of Psychology since 2013. B.A., Amherst College; M.A. and Ph.D., University of California at Los Angeles.
John S. Olsen. Professor Emeritus of Biology since 2014. B.S. and M.S. University of Illinois; Ph.D. University of Texas.
Gail S. Murray. Professor Emeritus of History since 2016. A.B., University of Michigan; M.S.E., University of Central Arkansas; and Ph.D., University of Memphis.
Bette J. Ackerman. Professor Emeritus of Psychology since 2016. B.A., Florida Presbyterian College; M.A. & Ph.D., University of Florida.
David Y. Jeter. Professor Emeritus of Chemistry since 2016. B.S., Texas A&M University; and Ph.D., University of North Carolina, Chapel Hill.
Julia Ewing. Professor Emeritus of Theatre since 2017. B.A., Sienna College; M.A University of Memphis.
Valeria Z. Nollan. Professor Emeritus of Russian Studies since 2017. B.A., University of Delaware; M.A.. & Ph.D., University of Pittsburgh. 

 

Endowments, Awards, and Memorials

Professorships and Faculty Fellowships

The Connie Abston Chair in Literature was created in 1998 by former trustee Dunbar Abston, Jr. in honor of his wife. Dr. Lori Garner, Associate Professor of English, holds the chair.

The Winton M. Blount Chair in Social Sciences was provided by the estate of Winton M. Blount, Chair of Rhodes' Board of Trustees 1988-92. Mr. Blount was a former U.S. Postmaster General and founder of Blount, Inc., an international construction firm based in Montgomery, Alabama. Dr. Marsha Walton, Professor of Psychology, currently holds the chair.

The L. Palmer Brown Chair of Interdisciplinary Humanities supports a professorship in the interdisciplinary course, “The Search for Values in the Light of Western History and Religion.” Dr. Tim Huebner, Professor of History, is the current holder of the Interdisciplinary Professorship.

The Neville Frierson Bryan Chair in African-American Literary & Cultural Studies was established in 2002 by former trustee and alumna Neville Frierson Bryan '58 of Chicago. An occupant will be named.

The Mertie Willigar Buckman Chair in International Studies was established in 1990 by trustee Robert H. Buckman to honor his mother. Dr. Andrew Michta, Professor of International Studies, holds the chair.

The Stanley J. Buckman Distinguished Professorship of International Studies, provided by trustee Robert H. Buckman, honors the founder of Buckman Laboratories and longtime friend and trustee of the college. The current occupant is Dr. Shadrack Nasang'o, Associate Professor of International Studies.

The Lester Crain Chair in Physics was established in 2002 by trustee and alumnus Lester Crain, Jr. '51. Dr. David Rupke, Assistant Professor of Physics, currently holds the chair.

The Albert Bruce Curry Professorship of Religious Studies was provided and sustained by Second Presbyterian Church of Memphis. Dr. Patrick Gray, Associate Professor of Religious Studies, is the current Curry Professor.

The Elizabeth G. Daughdrill and James H. Daughdrill, Jr. Professorships were provided by the Rhodes Board of Trustees in 1998 to recognize President and Mrs. Daughdrill's exemplary leadership and service to the college for 25 years. Dr. William Skoog, Professor of Music, is the current occupant of the Elizabeth G. Daughdrill Chair. The James H. Daughdrill, Jr. Chair is held by Dr. Mauricio Cafiero, Associate Professor of Chemistry.

The E. C. Ellett Professorship of Mathematics and Computer Science was created by Edward Coleman Ellett, Class of 1888. Dr. Chris Seaton is the current Ellett Professor.

The Fulmer Chair in Political Science for U.S. Presidential Studies was established in 2005 by Arthur Fulmer and the late Nancy Hill Fulmer '51, Rhodes trustee, to support work in the Department of Political Science. Dr. Michael Nelson, Professor of Political Science, currently holds the Fulmer Chair.

The Charles R. Glover Professorship of English Studies was provided by Mrs. Charles R. Glover and is occupied by Dr. Seth Rudy, Associate Professor of English.

The William Randolph Hearst Endowed Teaching Fellowship for Minority Graduate Students supports minority teaching fellows at Rhodes as they complete their dissertations, and is currently held by Raquel Baker.

The Ralph C. Hon Chair in Economics was provided by alumni who studied under Dr. Hon during his tenure as Professor of Economics. An occupant will be named.

The Joseph R. Hyde, III Professorship of Political Economy is an annually-funded position established in 2010 in the Department of Economics to support the study of Political Economy. It is provided by the J.R. Hyde, III Family Foundation and other anonymous donors. Dr. John E. Murray, Professor of Economics, is the current occupant.

The Robert D. McCallum Distinguished Professorship of Economics and Business was funded by the late Robert D. McCallum, Chairman Emeritus, Valmac Industries, Inc. and life trustee of Rhodes. Dr. Steven Caudill, Professor of Economics and Business, is the current occupant.

The J. J. McComb Professorship of History was provided by Mr. J. J. McComb and is occupied by Dr. Jeffrey Jackson.

The Irene and J. Walter McDonnell Chair in Greek and Roman Studies was established by trustee Michael McDonnell in memory of his parents. Dr. Susan Satterfield, Assistant Professor of Greek and Roman Studies, is the current occupant.

The Virginia Ballou McGehee Professorship of Muslim-Christian Relations was established by James E. McGehee, Jr. and Virginia Ballou McGehee '46 in 2007. Dr. John Kaltner is the current occupant of the McGehee Chair.

The W. J. Millard Professorship of Religious Studies was provided by his friends at Evergreen Presbyterian Church in Memphis and honors the late senior minister of the church. Dr. Mark Muesse, Associate Professor of Religious Studies is the current holder of the Millard Professorship.

The Plough Professor of Urban Studies was provided by an endowment grant from the Plough Foundation. Dr. Elizabeth Thomas, Associate Professor of Psychology, is the current holder of this professorship.

The Ellis W. Rabb Chair in Theatre was created through the estates of Clark and Carolyn Rabb to honor the memory of their son Ellis, one of the most accomplished stage actors and directors ever to emerge from Memphis. The Rabb Chair will support visiting artists-in-residence in the Theatre Department.

James T. and Valeria B. Robertson Chair in Biological Science was established in 2005 by James T. Robertson '53 and Valeria B. Robertson to support teaching and research in biology and related areas. Dr. Mary Miller, Associate Professor of Biology, holds the Robertson Chair.

The James D. Robinson Chair in Economics and Business Administration was created by the late Martha R. Robinson in memory of her husband. An occupant will be named.

The James F. Ruffin Professorship of Art and Archaeology was established by the late James F. Ruffin, Jr., founder and operator of Ruffin’s Imports and Interiors of Memphis. His mark can be found all around the Rhodes campus as well as the President’s home. The holder of the Ruffin Professorship is Dr. Victor Coonin, Associate Professor of Art.

The J. S. Seidman Fellowship in International Studies is supported by the estate of Rhodes trustee P. K. Seidman. Dr. Esen Kirdis, Assistant Professor of International Studies, is the current Seidman Fellow.

The P. K. Seidman Distinguished Professorship of Political Economy was provided by Robert H. Buckman and the late Mertie W. Buckman, in honor of their friend, the late P. K. Seidman. Dr. Steve Ceccoli, Associate Professor of International Studies is the current P.K. Seidman Distinguished Professor.

The Irma O. Sternberg Chair in History was established in 2012 with a gift from Mrs. Sternberg’s estate. Dr. Tim Huebner is the first holder of this chair.

The Van Vleet Fellowship was provided by The Van Vleet Foundation. The Fellowship, occupied by Dr. Shubho Banerjee, Associate Professor of Physics, provides for student research and strengthens the Physics Department.

The R. A. Webb Professorship of Religious Studies was provided by a friend of the college. Dr. Milton Moreland is the current Webb Professor.

The Spence L. Wilson Distinguished Chair in Humanities was established by trustee Spence L. Wilson, his wife Rebecca Webb Wilson, and the Kemmons Wilson Family Foundation. Dr. Jonathan Judaken, Professor of History, is the first holder of this chair.

The T. K. Young Professorship of English Literature was established by Idlewild Presbyterian Church in 1955 in honor of their senior minister. Dr. Rashna Richards, Associate Professor of English, currently holds the Young Chair.

Special Funds

The Batey Lecture Series honors New Testament scholar Dr. Richard Batey. It was provided by colleagues, family, and friends on the occasion of his retirement from Rhodes in 2005. The annual lecture is delivered by a visiting Biblical scholar.

The Frank and Marjo Benton Student Travel Fund was created in 2012 by Marjo and Frank Benton P'13 to support Math and Computer Science students when they attend professional meetings and conferences.

The Booth Cody Dortch Quinn Endowment for the Humanities was created in 2013 by Joan and John Quinn '58. The endowment will help bring nationally recognized leaders to campus to create special learning opportunities that will provide the foundation for community-wide dialogue.

The Boyle Endowment for the Study of Liberal Democracy was provided in 2008 by trustee J. Bayard Boyle, Jr. and his family. It is housed in the Department of Political Science to encourage and support teaching and research concerning the nature of constitutional government and the sources, principles, and practice of the institution of liberal democracy.

The Rosanna Cappellato Memorial Fund was established in 2013 through the estate of Rosanna Capellato and gifts from her friends.

The Charles P. Cobb '44 Endowment for Music, established in 2011 through his estate, provides discretionary funding for the Music Department to be used with the approval of the Dean of the Faculty. The Cobb Endowment may provide student fellowships or other support for the teaching and learning of music.

The Mike Curb Institute for Music was founded in 2006 by Mike and Linda Curb through the Mike Curb Family Foundation to foster awareness and understanding of the distinct musical traditions of the South and to study the effect music has had on its culture, history, and economy. Through the areas of preservation, research, leadership, and civic responsibility, the Institute provides support for faculty and facilitates opportunities for students to experience learning outside the classroom In partnership with the community.

The Pete Ekstrom Faculty Development Fund in Anthropology and Sociology was established in 2006 by an anonymous alumna. It will provide support for faculty to direct and mentor a student, pursue collaborative research, or develop enhancements to their programs. The chair of the department will determine the use of these funds.

The Jack D. Farris Visiting Writers Series was established in 2002 by a bequest from the Kathleen McClain '74 as a memorial to her beloved teacher, mentor and friend, Professor Jack D. Farris. Each year the Department of English will host published writers for readings and lectures.

The Julia Johnson Garrett '01 Library Collection Endowment was established in her honor by her parents, Edith H. and James R. Garrett, in 2001. Funds from the endowment are used to purchase rare or other books in the field of Art History, rare or other books in the field of Religious Studies, books in the field of Early Childhood Education, or if there is no need in those areas, where the need is greatest.

The Gerber-Taylor Fund was created by Meg and Charles Gerber in 2010 to provide funding for four years which will support student fellowships, programming, and staff in the Rhodes Learning Corridor. The Gerber-Taylor Fund will be used to provide an afterschool enhancement program and a community garden for nutritional education at the Promise Academy in the Learning Corridor.

The Martin-Kragh Faculty Development Fund for Biology and Chemistry was established in 2006 by former Rhodes trustee J. Stephen Martin and his late wife, Nancy Kragh Martin, parents of Stuart '08, to provide support for faculty in biology and chemistry to direct and mentor a student, pursue collaborative research, or develop enhancements to their programs.

The Michaelcheck Endowment for Faculty Support was created in 2000 by Rhodes Board Chair William J. Michaelcheck '69 and his wife Pam to provide funds for travel by faculty members to support their research and other academic endeavors.

The Iris A. Pearce Shakespeare Endowment was established in 2007 through the estate of Dr. Pearce '42. The endowment is used to enhance and enrich courses in Shakespeare, to provide guest speakers or visiting Shakespeare scholars and to fund research in the teaching of Shakespeare.

The Julian C. Nall '43 and Family Endowment for Faculty Support was established in 2011 by Julian C. Nall '43 and his family. It supports faculty professional development to help achieve career goals and better mentor students.

The Overend Endowment for Film Studies was created through the generosity of an alumnus in 2001. It provides support for guest speakers, films, books, and equipment purchases related to film studies.

The Rhodes Athletic Equipment Fund was established in 2013 in honor of Mike Clary '77 by Dr. and Mrs. James H. Daughdrill.

Rhodes CARES (Center for Academic Research and Education through Service), funded by a $6 million grant from the Robert and Ruby Priddy Charitable Trust of Wichita Falls, Texas, exists to strengthen undergraduate research and service tied to scholarship. The center encompasses programs such as Rhodes Institute for Regional Studies, Rhodes St. Jude Summer Plus research program, and Rhodes Learning Corridor. It also provides aid to students who have demonstrated experience in and commitment to community service.

Rhodes CODA (Center for Outreach in the Development of the Arts), established in 2005 through a $5 million grant from The Robert and Ruby Priddy Charitable Trust of Wichita Falls, Texas, enhances the college's program and curriculum offerings in the fine arts. The grant will provide a fine arts scholars program with 16 scholarship recipients–four per class–who will not be limited to fine arts majors but who will work either through performing a job, a service or a research project in the fine arts; an endowed chair for a permanent faculty position in the fine arts; and funding for curriculum and faculty development, student recruitment and mentoring, visiting artists, classroom and technology upgrades and other fine arts program enhancements.

The Richardson CODA Endowment was established by the late Kathleen Richardson in 2007. It provides programming and staff support for the Center for Outreach in the Development of the Arts at Rhodes. The program fosters leadership, vision, communications and innovation for future leaders in the fine arts.

The James R. Riedmeyer Collection was established in 1987 by Mr. Riedmeyer, then Senior Vice President, Federal Express Corporation. It is used to purchase books and periodicals in aviation, transportation, and communication.

The Riley Discretionary Endowment for Barret Library was created in 1998 by Dr. Robert I. Bourne, Jr. '54 and Anne Riley Bourne '54 in loving memory of Rev. Robert Quitman Riley, Class of 1894 (Anne’s grandfather); John Riley, Class of 1926 (Anne’s father); and Maclin Broadnax Riley, Class of 1930 (Anne’s uncle). It provides funds to be used at the discretion of the Director of Barret Library.

The Charles Robertson '65 Endowment for Student Research and Engagement in Physics was established in 2007 by Charles Robertson '65 to support research fellowships for students to work with Rhodes physics faculty. It will also support the students in activities that will engage them in the physics community and the community at large. Recipients are selected through an annual competitive application process.

The Jack U. Russell Collection was established in 1986 in his memory by his son Mark Russell. The Russell Collection is used to enhance the mathematics collection in honor of Dr. Russell's service at Rhodes as Professor of Mathematics 1954-1981.

The Herb Smith Endowment was established in 2010 to support Meeman Center classes that had been taught by Herb Smith, most notably “The Art of Conscious Living.”

The Paul Snodgrass '46 CODA Endowment was established through his estate. It provides programming and staff support for the Center for Outreach in the Development of the Arts at Rhodes. The program fosters leadership, vision, communications and innovation for future leaders in the fine arts.

The Helen Stauffer Memorial Library Fund was established in 2006 to provide funds to benefit the Paul Barret, Jr. Library.

The Irma Sternberg Faculty Support Fund in American History was established in 2009 through the estate of Irma Sternberg to support research and teaching in American history.

The White Family Regional Studies Endowment was created in 2007 through a bequest of John White '67. It will support students studying history through the Rhodes Institute for Regional Studies. Students selected for this opportunity are chosen through a competitive proposal process reviewed by the faculty of the institute.

The Spence Wilson Faculty Support in Religious Studies Endowment was established in 2012 by Spence L. Wilson, former Chair and current member of the Rhodes Board of Trustees. The recipient is Dr. Steven L. McKenzie.

Art Collections

The Robert I. and Anne Riley Bourne Collection was given in 1998 by the Bournes, both members of the Class of 1954. The photographic prints represent the work of distinguished photographer Edward J. Curtis and document life of Native Americans in the Pacific Northwest, circa 1905. Selected prints are periodically displayed in the Clough-Hanson Gallery and are used for teaching.

The Jessie L. Clough Art Memorial for Teaching was given to Rhodes in 1953 by sisters Floy and Etta Hanson in memory of their friend and first art teacher. The collection of Asian woodcut prints, porcelains, fabrics, and other objects forms the basis of the college's teaching collection. Selected objects are periodically displayed in the Clough-Hanson Gallery.

The Dorothy Seymour Harnden Collection in North American Native Art was given to Rhodes in 1990 in her memory by her husband, the late Robert C. Harnden. The Harnden Collection is on permanent display in Halliburton Tower and Buckman Hall.

The Harvey A. Pankin Collection was given in his memory by his son Jayson D. Pankin of Michigan in 1997. The prints, dating from 1960-80, document many of the styles or movements of those decades, including op art, hard-edged abstractions, figurative art, and photo-realism. Selected prints are periodically displayed in the Clough-Hanson Gallery and are used for teaching.

Awards

The Louise and Ward Archer, Sr. Award for Creativity, given by his late wife and his children, recognizes the student selected as having demonstrated the most creativity at Rhodes. The award honors the memory of Ward Archer, Sr. '39, founder of Ward Archer & Associates, now the public relations firm Archer/Malmo, and his wife Louise Thompson Archer '44, whose early career was in the advertising field in New York.

The Mac Armour Physics Fellows were established in 2015 in memory of Mac Armour '16 by Meri and Donald Armour.

The Anne Howard Bailey '45 Prize for Creative Writing was established by the estate of Anne Howard Bailey '45 in 2009 and given annually for excellence and merit in Creative Writing.

The J.Allen Boone '71 Award was established in 2013 by Dr. and Mrs. James H. Daughdrill. It is awarded to the Most Outstanding Student in Accounting.

The William Bruce '11 Award for Outstanding Paper in Art History was created in 2013 by Louise and Mike Bruce P'11 in memory of their son. This award is determined based on the review of student papers each spring by the Art History faculty.

The Ruth Moore Cobb Award in Instrumental Music was established by the late trustee Charles P. Cobb '44 in honor of his wife. The award is presented annually to the outstanding student instrumentalist in the Music Department as judged by the Music faculty.

The Estelle R. Cone Award is given annually to that student selected for outstanding service in an individual project through the Kinney Program. The award is in memory of Mrs. Cone, who was Kinney Program Director from its founding until 1975.

The Charlie Cook Award for Excellence in Political Science was established in 2013 by Lucy and Charlie Cook P'08. The scholarship is awarded to a senior who shows excellence in Political Science.

The J. Hal Daughdrill Award was established in 1986 by friends of Rhodes with memorial gifts to remember the eighteenth President's father. The award goes to the most valuable player of the football team.

The Clarence Day Award for Outstanding Teaching, established in 1981 by the late Clarence C. Day '52 of Memphis, is given annually to a full-time member of the teaching faculty at Rhodes to recognize excellence in teaching.

The Dean’s Award for Outstanding Research and Creative Activity was established by the late Clarence C. Day '52 of Memphis in 1981 to recognize a Rhodes faculty member for significant research and/or creative activity which has been brought to fruition in a public form, e.g. scholarly writing, public performances.

The CBIZ MHM Accounting Awards previously known as The Thompson Dunavant PLC Accounting Awards were established by Thompson Dunavant PLC in 2008. One award is given each year to an outstanding junior majoring in commerce and business to provide financial aid during the senior year. A second award is given to an outstanding senior majoring in commerce and business who will enter and use the award for financial aid in the Rhodes' Masters of Science in Accounting program the academic year immediately after graduation.

The Theodore William Eckels International Business Internships were established in 2010 by his wife Betty Eckels, her son Rick Eckels '70 and her daughter-in-law, Rhodes trustee Laila Adams Eckels '71. This internship outside the U.S. at an international business is restricted to deserving rising juniors and seniors majoring in commerce and business or economics with relevant foreign language skills.

The Garrott Award was established in honor of Thomas M. Garrott, III. Chosen by the Political Economy faculty members, this award recognizes a student who has demonstrated excellence in Political Economy.

The Donald J. Gattas Memorial Award is given annually to the student judged to be most outstanding in Middle Eastern Studies.

The Rebecca Rish Gay Most Outstanding Female Athlete of the Year Award was established in 1996 by Dr. and Mrs. James H. Daughdrill, Jr. in memory of her mother.

The Walter E. Gay Most Oustanding Male Athlete of the Year Award was established in 1996 by Dr. and Mrs. James H. Daughdrill, Jr. in honor of her father.

The Mel Grinspan Award for the Outstanding Intern was established in honor of the late Mel G. Grinspan, Professor Emeritus of Economics. The award recognizes a student who exemplifies excellence in achieving significant and measurable credit within the internship program.

The Sally Becker Grinspan Award for Artistic Achievement was established during his lifetime by Professor Emeritus Mel G. Grinspan to honor his wife. It is presented each year to a student majoring in art who produces that piece of art, in any medium, which is selected by a committee of artists and/or art curators as an outstanding creation.

The Michael E. Hendrick '67 Award in Organic Chemistry was established in his memory by his wife Martha S. Laurie '69 and their friends. It provides a summer stipend for outstanding students to conduct research in the field of organic chemistry.

The Ralph C. Hon Leadership Award recognizes a senior Commerce and Business major who has the highest achievement in the area of leadership.

The Hunter Award for Excellence in Neuroscience was established in 2006 through the estate of Arthur W. and Doris B. Hunter to recognize graduating neuroscience majors, who have been accepted into a graduate program in neuroscience or a related field, and who have excelled in the classroom and laboratory.

The Wasfy B. Iskander International Internship in Economics was provided by family and friends of the late economics professor. It provides an internship experience outside the U.S. for a rising senior majoring in economics.

The Jameson M. Jones Award for Outstanding Faculty Service continues a practice of recognizing faculty service first started by the Charles E. Diehl Society in 1988. The award, which honors a current faculty member who has rendered exemplary service and provided leadership to the Rhodes community, was provided in 2005 by Rhodes alumnus and trustee, John D. Gladney '74. Dr. Jameson M. Jones '36 served as professor of moral philosophy and dean of the college from 1955 to 1971.

The Jane Donaldson Kepple Writing Prizes are awarded annually to four students for excellence in writing as judged by a committee of faculty members. The awards are given in four categories: Freshman English Essay; Senior English Essay; Poetry, Fiction, and Drama; and Scholarly Essay. These prizes were established in 1985 by Thomas R. Kepple, Jr. in memory of his wife.

The Rose & Solly Korsakov Psychology Award was provided by Allan B. Korsakov '64 to honor his parents’ memory, foresight, wisdom, and sacrifices for their two sons. The Korsakov Award recognizes an outstanding student in the field of psychology.

The Morelle Legg International Internship for Women provides international internship opportunities with preference given to female economics or commerce and business majors.

The George Lapides Sportsmanship Award was established in 2014 by various donors. It will be awarded every spring at the Rhodes Athletic Banquet to the senior athlete who best exemplifies highest level of sportsmanship.

The Freeman C. Marr Track and Field Award is presented annually to the outstanding athlete who best exemplifies dedication to the principles of scholarship and athletics. This award honors Freeman C. Marr '48: athlete, scholar, coach and dedicated alumnus of the college.

The Robert D. McCallum Competitive Enterprise Award was established by Dr. Ben. W. Bolch, Professor Emeritus of Economics and Business Administration, in honor of the late Robert D. McCallum, a trustee of the college. It is awarded annually to a student who is deemed to have carried out the most significant entrepreneurial activity while at Rhodes.

The Mollie Royall McCord Memorial Prize in Bible was established by a bequest from Mollie R. McCord '36. It goes to a senior or rising senior who has shown promise in this area and is interested in a career as a church minister, missionary or medical missionary.

The Susan Tidball Means Award was created in 1991 to be awarded to a junior student and to assist in underwriting a project in Women's Studies.

The Fred Neal Freshman Prize is awarded to the outstanding student in the interdisciplinary course, “The Search for Values in the Light of Western History and Religion.” It was established by friends of Professor Neal during his lifetime.

The Lynn Nettleton Prize was created by Lynn N. and Olive Allen Hughes in memory of his grandfather and in honor of their daughter, Dixon Presswood Schultz '83. It is awarded to the senior who has written the year's most outstanding paper in economics or business.

The Cynthia Marshall Award was created in 2005 by family and friends of Professor Cynthia Marshall. The award is given to the most deserving senior majoring in English who is pursuing graduate studies in any field in the humanities.

The Memphis Panhellenic Association, in its desire to encourage scholarship, presents an award to the sorority woman of the graduating class at Rhodes College having the highest scholastic average for her entire college career.

The John Planchon Award for Excellence in Commerce and Business was established in 2013 by Dr. and Mrs. James H. Daughdrill. It is awarded to the Most Outstanding Student in Business and Commerce.

The Peyton Nalle Rhodes Phi Beta Kappa Award was created by members of the Rhodes Chapter of Phi Beta Kappa.

The Margaret R. & Rudolf R. Ruyl Award for Religious Studies was established in 1996 by The Ruyl Family Fund in memory of Margaret F. ′61 & Rudolf R. Ruyl. This annual award supports faculty development. 

The Jack U. Russell Awards in Mathematics were established by friends of Professor Jack Russell of Rhodes. They are awarded to outstanding mathematics students selected by the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science.

The Jane Hyde Scott Awards, established by a bequest from Jane Hyde Scott '30, are given to rising seniors for special academic activities in the summer prior to the senior year. Five awards are given annually: The Robert Allen Scott Award in Mathematics, The Joseph Reeves Hyde Award in Religious Studies, The Ruth Sherman Hyde Award in Music, The Margaret Ruffin Hyde Award in Psychology, and

The Jeanne Scott Varnell Award in Classical Languages.

The W. O. Shewmaker Memorial Fund was established by alumni and friends in memory of Dr. W. O. Shewmaker, Professor of Bible at Rhodes 1925-41. The income from this fund is used annually for an award of books to the student who attains the highest distinction in the interdisciplinary course, “The Search for Values in the Light of Western History and Religion.”

The Ida LeBlanc “Lee” Smith Foreign Studies Award was established in her memory by her family, friends and classmates. Lee '05 is remembered for her enhancement of her Rhodes experience through participation in the college's British Studies at Oxford program. This award helps to fund a study abroad opportunity for a student who might not otherwise be financially able to undertake such study.

The Spencer Prizes in Greek were established in memory of Mr. H. N. Spencer, Port Gibson, Mississippi. They are awarded to those students in each class who attain the highest distinction. In addition, a prize is awarded to the student who has attained the highest absolute, not merely relative, grade during four years of Greek courses.

The Algernon Sydney Sullivan Awards, a medallion and certificate provided by the New York Southern Society of the City of New York, are awarded to the man and woman students of the graduating class and to one outstanding citizen of the community who best exemplify Mr. Sullivan’s ideals of excellence in character and service to humanity.

The Spence Wilson Faculty International Travel Fund was established in 2007 by the Kemmons Wilson Family Foundation in honor of Rhodes trustee Spence L. Wilson. The funds will be used to fund faculty international travel opportunities including but not limited to conducting research outside the U.S.; collaborating with colleagues from throughout the world; traveling to retool or expand our curriculum; presenting papers at international conferences; and taking students abroad.

The Rob Wolcott '93 Endowed Internship was provided by family and friends to support an internship at the Church Health Center in recognition of Rob's commitment to service and health care for the poor and homeless.

Scholarships and Fellowships

The following listing of scholarships and fellowships is provided for informational purposes to showcase the rich scope of opportunities at Rhodes and to honor the generous benefactors who have provided these scholarships and fellowships. Please refer to the Financial Aid Application Procedures if you are interested in pursuing scholarship assistance at Rhodes. You should be aware that not every scholarship is available every year. Many of the scholarships listed here are renewable and are retained by the chosen recipients throughout their four years at Rhodes. You can be confident, however, that each aid applicant is automatically considered for every available scholarship and fellowship for which s/he qualifies.

The George I. Alden Trust Scholarship was funded by a challenge grant from the George I. Alden Trust and gifts from alumni and friends of the college. It is used for general scholarship aid for students with need.

The Elizabeth Alley Ahlgren Art Scholarship was established in 1987 by Dr. Frank R. Ahlgren of Memphis in honor of his wife for worthy students interested in painting or sculpture.

The Emerson A. and Emily Peale Alburty Scholarships were established by Mr. and Mrs. Alburty of Memphis during their lifetimes. Selection of the scholarship recipients is based primarily on financial need and preference will be given to Memphis and Shelby County residents.

The Mary Orme Amis Scholarships for Women were established by family members to honor their mother and are awarded to deserving female students.

The Catherine D. Anderson Scholarship was established by the late Ms. Anderson of Hughes, Arkansas.

The Walter P. Armstrong, Sr. Memorial Scholarship was established by Dr. Walter P. Armstrong, Jr., the law firm of Armstrong Allen, and friends.

The A. L. Aydelott Students Memorial Scholarship Fund was established by his daughter, the late Mrs. Josephine A. Johnson, Memphis.

The Mary Lowry Bacon Scholarship was established by her son, Henry W. Bacon, and her granddaughter, Barbara B. Henderson. It is awarded to a student of religion.

The John W. Baird M.D. and Florence D. Baird Scholarship was established in 1999 by Florence Baird '40. It provides aid to deserving students with demonstrated financial need.

The Minnie Lee Hamer Bales '35 CODA Scholarship was created in 2010 through her estate. It provides aid to deserving students participating in the Center for Outreach in the Development of the Arts at Rhodes. The program fosters leadership, vision, communications and innovation for future leaders in the fine arts.

The Leon T. Banakas '53 Scholarship was established by Mrs. Frances Mellen-Banakas in memory of her husband. It provides aid to deserving pre-medical students on the basis of academic promise and ability.

The Albert D. Banta Scholarships provide for Rhodes College one-third of the income from a trust created by the late Albert D. Banta, Shreveport, Louisiana.

The Donna Lorraine Barlett Scholarship, created by alumna Ms. Barlett '80, gives preference to students with financial need who are in foster care or who are from a single-parent household.

The Frank G. Barton Scholarship Fund was established by his wife, the late Mrs. Pauline C. Barton, Memphis.

The James H. and Carol P. Barton International Study Fellowship was established by Rhodes trustee James H. Barton in 2006. It provides financial aid for deserving students who desire to study abroad. Recipients are selected by competitive application.

The Adam P. Beeler Christian Service with Youth Scholarship was established by the family and friends of the late Adam Beeler '99. The scholarship is to be awarded to a deserving junior or senior who has demonstrated a commitment to Christian service in an under-resourced environment with preference given to students who have been active with STREETS Ministries and/or The Neighborhood School.

The Bellingrath Fellowships were established through the will of Walter D. Bellingrath. Consideration is by nomination only and the Bellingrath Scholars are chosen based on their academic and extracurricular records and an interview by a scholarship selection committee.

The BellSouth Mobility Scholarship was provided by BellSouth Mobility, now merged into AT&T, for a deserving student with demonstrated financial need. Preference is given to students from Memphis.

The Herman Bensdorf II Scholarship, established in 1988, is awarded to a junior from Shelby County with an interest in business and a 3.0 grade point average. The scholarship may be renewed in the recipient's senior year.

The Francis B. and Mildred Benton Scholarship was established in 2006 through the estate of Francis B. Benton '36 to aid deserving students participating in the Center for Outreach in the Development of the Arts at Rhodes. The program fosters leadership, vision, communications and innovation for future leaders in the arts.

The Jacque Hammett Betts and Margarette H. Wurtsbaugh Scholarship was established by the late Mrs. Betts, and Mr. and Mrs. Alfred D. Wilhelm of Little Rock, in memory of these sisters who were Mrs. Wilhelm's aunts.

The Herman W. Bevis Scholarship was created and later endowed in her lifetime by the late Mrs. Jenny Lyde Bevis in memory of her husband, Herman Bevis '30.

The Winton and Carolyn Blount Service Scholarship was provided in 2005 by the estate of Winton M. Blount, Chair of Rhodes' Board of Trustees 1988-92. Mr. Blount was a former U.S. Postmaster General and founder of Blount, Inc., an international construction firm based in Montgomery, Alabama. It provides financial aid for deserving students who have demonstrated experience and commitment to community service.

The Bonner Foundation Scholarships, funded by The Corella and Bertram F. Bonner Foundation, provide financial aid for deserving students who demonstrate experience and commitment to community service and have high financial need. Each student receives a grant for financial aid, a stipend to substitute for work study aid, and a summer living allowance.

The Eleanor and Millard Bosworth Scholarship was established in their memory by their daughter, the late Eleanor Bosworth Shannon. It is awarded annually to students with need.

The Elizabeth Bourne Webb '81 & John Riley Bourne Service Scholarship was established by Dr. and Mrs. Robert Irl Bourne, Jr., members of the class of 1954. The scholarship is awarded to students who demonstrate interest and involvement in community service as an applicant to Rhodes and while at Rhodes commit to engage in approximately ten hours of weekly community service.

The Dr. Robert Irl and Anne Riley Bourne Scholarship was established by the Bournes, both members of the Class of 1954, to be awarded to deserving students on the basis of academic promise and ability.

The Helen M. Bowld Scholarship is awarded each year to a student of religion in grateful memory of Miss Helen M. Bowld, a dedicated member of the college staff for many years.

The J. Bayard Boyle, Sr. Scholarship was created by the late Sam M. Fleming of Nashville to honor the memory of his good friend. Additional support was provided by Joanne Fleming Hayes and Toby S. Wilt. It is awarded to a student with financial need.

The Arabia Wooten Brakefield '42 and Betty Mae Wooten Michael Scholarship was established by their father, the late Mr. Hoyt B. Wooten, Memphis.

The Helen '51 and Denby Brandon '50 Scholarship was established in 1999 by Mr. and Mrs. Brandon in honor of their 50th class reunions.

The Theodore Brent Scholarship was established by Mr. Brent of New Orleans.

The C.A. and Louise Branyan Fellowship was established in 2009 by Carole Louise Branyan '67 in memory of her parents. This fellowship gives preference to female graduates from White Station High School, Memphis, TN who are of the Presbyterian faith.

The Charles and Helen Branyan Fellowship was created by Carole Louise Branyan '67 in 2009 to honor the memory of her aunt and uncle. This fellowship gives preference to female graduates from White Station High School, Memphis, TN who are of the Presbyterian faith.

The LeNeil McCullough Broach Scholarship was funded through the estate of Ms. LeNeil McCullough Broach '29.

The Brown Scholarship was established in 2006 by Susan E. Brown, parent of Clark Ruppert '10. The scholarship is awarded to residents of Shelby County, Tennessee, with demonstrated high financial need who have a willingness to be engaged in activities at Rhodes and who have potential for academic success.

The C. Whitney Brown Scholarship was established by friends and family of the late C. Whitney Brown to provide assistance to economically disadvantaged Shelby County students, not otherwise able to attend Rhodes, sponsored by any Memphis organization dedicated to improving the future of Memphis youths. Preference is given to Memphis Boys Club/Girls Club members.

The Enoch Brown Scholarship, established by the late Mrs. Enoch Brown, Franklin, Tennessee, in memory of her husband, is awarded to students from Shelby County or Williamson County, Tennessee.

The Jean Brown Scholarship was established through a bequest from the late Miss Jean Brown of Hot Springs, Arkansas.

The L. Palmer Brown Service Scholarship was founded in 2004 by Axson and Bryan Morgan in honor of L. Palmer Brown. This scholarship is awarded based on merit and financial need.

The Robert L. Brown Scholarship was provided through the estate of alumnus Robert L. Brown '35.

The S. Toof Brown Scholarship was established by Whit Brown in memory of his father.

The W. C. Brown Memorial Scholarship was established by the children of the late William Clark Brown, Sr., Stamps, Arkansas.

The John H. Bryan Scholarship was established during his lifetime by the late John H. Bryan, Sr., West Point, Mississippi, founder of Bryan Foods.

The Louise and John Bryan CODA Fellowship was established in 2007 by trustee John H. Bryan, III '83 and his wife Louise. It provides aid to deserving students participating in the Center for Outreach in the Development of the Arts at Rhodes. The program fosters leadership, vision, communications and innovation for future leaders in the fine arts.

The Annie Rose and Leslie H. Buchman Scholarship was established by Southern Fabricators, Inc., Mr. Paul Isbell, and the late Mrs. Buchman of Memphis.

The Mertie W. Buckman International Scholarships for Women are awarded annually to deserving junior and senior students with financial need to participate in Rhodes-sponsored programs abroad or in Rhodes' exchange programs. Preference is given to women students.

The Robert Buckman Scholarships for Study Abroad were established in 2003 by Rhodes trustee Robert H. Buckman and his wife Joyce Mollerup to enable qualified students to study abroad, either for a semester or for a complete academic year, and to then participate in the development of international awareness at Rhodes upon their return. Buckman Scholars must have completed at least two semesters at Rhodes at the time of the award and preference will be given to juniors or rising juniors. Demonstrated financial need may be a consideration in the granting of these scholarships. These scholarships are not available to students applying for summer program study. For more information, contact the Buckman Center for International Programs.

The Stanley Joseph and Mertie Willigar Buckman Scholarship was established by the late Mrs. Buckman to support students with need.

The Buntyn Presbyterian Church Scholarship was established to provide assistance to a student from Tennessee.

The Chloe Malone Burch Service Scholarship was created in 2010 through her estate. It provides financial aid for deserving students who have demonstrated experience in and commitment to community service.

The Mary Ross Burkhart Scholarship was established in 2013 by Pedie Pedersen '70 to honor former Rhodes Professor Mary Ross “Tara” Burkhart.

The Catherine W. Burrow Scholarship was established by the late Mrs. Burrow of Memphis.

The Kathryn Brown Butler Emergency Assistance Fund was established in 2011 by The Kathryn Brown Butler Family Foundation. It provides emergency aid beyond the normal financial aid to students who are active and successful members of the Rhodes community and demonstrate a need for emergency assistance.

The Betty Calandruccio Scholarship, established by Mrs. Calandruccio in memory of Dr. Peyton Nalle Rhodes, President Emeritus of the college, provides financial aid with preference given to female students who demonstrate financial need.

The Katherine Carter Service Scholarship was established in 2006 by Thomas L. Carter, Jr. and Eugenia Graves Carter, parents of Katherine '05. It is awarded to students who demonstrate financial need as well as experience with and commitment to community service.

The Samuel Craighead Caldwell Memorial Scholarship was established by First Presbyterian Church, Hazlehurst, Mississippi.

The Wheeler Carleton Scholarship was established in 1947 by the Women of the Church of the Synod of Alabama. Preference is given to a Presbyterian student from Alabama.

The Dr. and Mrs. Herbert V. Carson Scholarship was established by Mr. and Mrs. Herbert V. Carson, Jr. of Houston in memory of his parents.

The Christina Barham Caruthers Service Scholarship was established in 2006 through the estate of Christina Barham Caruthers. It is awarded to students who demonstrate experience in and commitment to community service.

The Fay Rye Caudle CODA Scholarship was established by Scott Rye '83 and Ruth Metcalfe Rye '84 in 2007. It provides aid to deserving students participating in the Center for Outreach in the Development of the Arts at Rhodes. The program fosters leadership, vision, communications and innovation for future leaders in the fine arts.

The CBJR Foundation Emergency Assistance Fund was provided in 2013 by the CBJR Foundation to provide support to students who find themselves in emergency financial need.

The Walter Chandler Scholarship was established by citizens of Memphis in honor of the former mayor of Memphis.

The Chapman Service Scholarship was established in 2005 by Christopher J. Chapman and Mary Beth Blackwell-Chapman, parents of Molly '05. It provides financial aid for deserving students who have demonstrated financial need as well as experience with and commitment to community service.

The Alice S. Christenson Scholarship was created in her honor by her son, Gray Stevens '82 and his wife Allison. It benefits students of high academic ability with demonstrated financial need. Preference is given to students from Alabama.

The Anne Marie Clark '12 Fellowship was established in 2012 by Ed Clark P'12 in honor of his daughter. The scholarship will provide support for one student's four years at Rhodes, provided s/he maintains satisfactory grades, carries a full-time course load, and takes advantage of at least one beyond-the-classroom learning opportunity that furthers his/her academic or career interests.

The Class of 1950 Scholarship was provided by alumni of the Class of 1950 in honor of their 50th Class Reunion in October, 2000.

The John Colby Service Scholarship was established in Barry Johnson '83 and Susanna Johnson in 2007 to support students with demonstrated financial need and commitment to community service and leadership.

The Jefferson K. Cole Scholarship was established by the late Mrs. Anna P. Cole of Memphis in memory of her husband.

The Elizabeth Williams Cooper '30 Scholarship was established by the late Mr. and Mrs. A. B. Cooper of Nashville in appreciation of the education that Rhodes provided Mrs. Cooper.

The James Leonard Cooper Scholarship was established by his late daughter, Miss Lula W. Cooper.

The Mrs. John S. Cooper Memorial Scholarship was established by Mr. Douglas Johnston of Memphis in memory of his mother.

The Robert Emmet Craig Scholarship was established by his late wife, Mrs. Robert E. Craig, and his daughters, Mrs. Amelia Craig Lane and Mrs. Samuel Sanders III, New Orleans, Louisiana.

The Serena Crawford Scholarship for Women was initiated by alumnae Sallie Brooks Clark '76, Donna Kay Fisher '71, Katherine Maddox McElroy '77, Carol Ellis Morgan '76, and Sara Jeannette Sims '76 in memory of their friend Serena '75. It provides assistance to women students with financial need.

The Jere Lawrence Crook, Jr. Scholarship was established by a generous gift of the late Mr. Crook, prominent Memphis real estate developer, world traveler and civic leader. Preference is given to international students.

The Patsy Braswell Culverhouse '54 Scholarship was created in her memory by her husband Cecil Culverhouse and their sons Ian and Rob. The scholarship benefits a young woman who would not be able to attend Rhodes without financial aid.

The Curran-Lydick Scholarship was established in 2013 by Chrissy and Walter Lydick ’68 .The scholarship is designed to challenge and graduate talented students from middle income families.

The James and Elizabeth Daughdrill Scholarship was established in 2014 by Robert H. Buckman and Joyce A. Mollerup. The scholarship will be awarded to a worthy student with need who has overcome significant obstacles on their path college.

The Ellen Davies-Rodgers Scholarship in Early Elementary Education was established by the late Dr. Ellen Davies-Rodgers. This scholarship is presented to an outstanding student with special interest in early elementary education.

The Dan W. Davis Service Scholarship was provided in 2005 through the estate of Dan W. Davis of Memphis. It provides financial aid for deserving students who have demonstrated experience and commitment to community service.

The Jefferson Davis Scholarship was established by the late Jefferson Davis and his widow, Jerdone, of Atlanta, Georgia, both alumni of the college, classes of 1931 and 1934. Mr. Davis served for many years as a member of the Board of Trustees.

The Davison Scholarship was established by Mr. W. F. Davison, Misses Ethel and Marjory Davison, and Mrs. J. D. Crosby in memory of their parents. Preference is given to qualified students from the area formerly known as the Synod of Alabama.

The Mary Robertson Day Scholarship was established by the Watauga Chapter of Daughters of the American Revolution.

The A. Clark and Mary Cooper Dean Scholarship was established in 1992 to assist deserving students in receiving a liberal arts education.

The Dickson Family Scholarship is provided by the late Dr. Bonnie Adair Dickson, the late Frederick L. Dickson, Jr. '38 and the late Elizabeth Blue Dickson '39.

The Charles E. Diehl Scholarship was established from the estates of Mrs. Lula Reese and Erma Reese Solomon.

The Charles I. Diehl Scholarship was endowed by a bequest from Charles I. Diehl '31, who served as Dean of Men and Professor of Education for the college. It is awarded to a deserving student with demonstrated financial need.

The Diehl Scholarship in Voice was established in memory of Mrs. Christiana Nolte Diehl and Mrs. Katherine Ireys Diehl by members of the Diehl family and friends. This scholarship is awarded to a student majoring in voice based on academic achievement.

The Katherine Ireys Diehl and Mary Pond Diehl Memorial Scholarship was established at Rhodes and supported through the generosity of Katherine Diehl's son, the late Mr. Charles I. Diehl, and the Association of Rhodes Women.

The Christina Zengel Dinkelacker Memorial Scholarship was funded by family and friends of Christina '70. The scholarship goes to a deserving female student to enable her to study abroad with preference for programs in art, languages, and literature.

The Hugo Dixon Scholarship was established through a gift from the George H. McFadden and Bro. Fund of Memphis in memory of Mr. Dixon who was Chairman of the Board of Valmac Industries, patron of the arts in Memphis and the Mid-South, and business and civic leader.

The Elizabeth Rodgers Dobell Scholarship was established through contributions from family members and friends in memory of Elizabeth Dobell '58.

The Janice Ost Donelson Scholarship was created by family and friends in 2010 to honor the late wife of Dr. Lewis Donelson '38.

The Joseph A. Dunglinson Scholarship was established by the First Presbyterian Church of Selma, Alabama, in honor of its minister.

The Paul and Frances Durff Scholarship was provided by Judith Simono Durff '66 and Thomas H. Durff '65 to honor his parents. The scholarship is awarded to students with need from a Memphis public school.

The David Burns and Blanche Butler Earhart Scholarship was established by Mrs. Blanche Butler Earhart of Memphis.

The John A. Edmiston, Jr. Scholarship was established by his parents, Mr. and Mrs. John A. Edmiston, Sr.

The J. S. and Capitola Edmondson Scholarship was established by the late Mr. and Mrs. J. S. Edmondson of Memphis to aid worthy students.

The Mark A. Edwards '79 Memorial Fund was created with memorial gifts from his family and friends.

The John Farley Scholarship was established in 1990 upon his death by the family and friends of John Farley '37, a noted lawyer in New York.

The Anna and Jack D. Farris Scholarship was created by alumni couple Mark '82 and Elizabeth Sheppard '84 Hurley. It honors Anna Farris, former Associate Dean of the British Studies at Oxford Program at Rhodes, and the late Jack Farris, Professor Emeritus of English.

The Joseph Peyton Faulk Memorial Fund was established by Robert W. Faulk in memory of his father to aid worthy students with need from Tipton County, Tennessee, who are pursuing a full-time course of study leading to a bachelors degree.

The Federal Express Scholarship was established by FedEx Corporation.

The Nancy Tanner & James Rodney Feild Scholarship was established by J. Rodney Feild. Preference is given to pre-medical students with need who serve in a hospital or clinic treating private patients.

The Files Sisters Memorial Scholarship was established by the late Miss R. M. Files, Shreveport, Louisiana.

The James O. Finley '26 Family Scholarship, created by Dr. James G. Finley '62 and his wife Mary Lou Carwile Finley '64, provides financial aid with preference for students from Middle Tennessee.

The First Presbyterian Church Memorial Scholarship was established by the First Presbyterian Church of Gallatin, Tennessee.

The Josie Millsaps Fitzhugh Scholarship was established by The Josephine Circle of Memphis, in honor of its founder, the late Mrs. Gutson T. Fitzhugh, Memphis.

The Sarah Mackenzie Flemister and Robert C. Flemister, Jr. Scholarship was established by the late Mr. and Mrs. Robert C. Flemister, Jr. '26 of Birmingham, Alabama, for deserving students with need.

The Amy and Cary Fowler Crossroads Fellowship was established in 2014. Students will collect and catalog historically important source materials which chronicle various aspects of the Civil Rights movement in the Memphis area.

The Cary Fowler Environmental Studies International Fellowship was established in 2012 by trustee Steve Lainoff and his wife, Riea. This fellowship will be awarded to a senior to work for the Global Crop Diversity Trust for at least one year following graduation from Rhodes College.

The Joseph A. and Morgan C. Fowler Scholarship Fund was established in 1957 with a gift from the Freemasons. Since then, the scholarship has grown through the generosity of the Lillian Goldman Charitable Trust, Cary Fowler '71, and Amy Goldman Fowler. The scholarship honors Cary's parents, and is awarded each year to a worthy student.

The Edgar Wiggin Francisco Scholarship and The Ruth Bitzer Francisco Scholarship were established by Dr. Edgar Wiggin Francisco, III '52 in honor of his father and mother.

The Fraser Lagniappe Scholarship Fund provides scholarship assistance to a nontraditional age student with financial need.

The John Chester Frist Memorial Scholarship was created by his brother, the late Dr. Thomas C. Frist, Sr. '28, a Rhodes trustee. John was a leader in many areas of campus life. He was a minister and leader in the Presbyterian Church until his death in 1959.

The Jennie Puryear Gardner Scholarship was established in 2007 by Mildred Puryear Marshall in honor of her sister, Jennie Puryear Gardner '31. Preference is given to women from the South with an interest in writing or literature.

The T.M. Garrott, Jr. and Lina H. Garrott Scholarship was created through their estates to assist deserving students from Mississippi selected on the basis of academic promise and ability. Their son, Rhodes trustee Thomas M. Garrott, III has increased the value of the Garrott Scholarship through additional gifts.

The Robert L. Gay Service Scholarship was provided in 2005 through the estate of alumnus Robert L. Gay '62. It provides financial aid for deserving students who have demonstrated experience and commitment to community service.

The Mary Snowden Treadwell Gee and Elisha Gee Scholarship, established in Mr. Gee's memory by Mrs. Gee during her lifetime, recognizes the many outstanding Rhodes College students who worked for Mr. Gee. The scholarship is awarded to students with need.

The Georgia Scholarships, endowed by an anonymous foundation, provide assistance to students with recognized leadership potential from middle-income Georgia families. Preference is given to members of the Christian faith.

The German Study Abroad Fellowship was established by an anonymous alumnus in 2008 to encourage students to adopt a minor or major in German and to learn the German culture. It is awarded to students who wish to study abroad in Germany and have demonstrated financial need.

The A. Benson Gilmore Memorial Service Scholarship was created by Rhodes trustee Vicki Gilmore Palmer '75 in honor of Dr. and Mrs. James H. Daughdrill, Jr., President Emeritus of the college and his wife, and in memory of Ms. Palmer's mother. It benefits minority students with financial need who have demonstrated experience in and commitment to community service.

The Sally Pettus Gold Scholarship was established by Dr. Edward A. Mohns of Portland, Oregon.

The Goldsmith Family Scholarship was established through a gift from the Goldsmith Foundation in memory of Jacob and Dora Goldsmith.

The C. M. Gooch Scholarships were established by the will of Mr. C. M. Gooch, prominent Mid-South lumberman and businessman.

The Abe Goodman Memorial Scholarship was established by his sons, Charles, Abe, and William Goodman, Memphis.

The Dan F. Goodwin, Jr. Scholarship was given in honor of Dan F. Goodwin, Jr., member of Rhodes Board of Trustees for eight years. Preference is given to children of ministers from the states of Louisiana and Texas and selection is based primarily on financial need.

The Margaret Gorman Scholarship was established by John F. Gratz, Jr., of Memphis, to be given annually to that student who, in the judgment of the faculty of the Music Department, presents the greatest proficiency in the understanding and performance of the classical and romantic periods of music on the piano or to a deserving student majoring in music composition

The Lorle and Neely Grant Scholarship was established by Lorle Grant, whose late husband, Neely, was a member of Rhodes Class of 1946. The scholarship is awarded to minority students with need.

The Fred R. Graves Scholarship was established by friends of the late Dr. Graves, longtime Presbyterian minister in Mississippi, and by Mr. and Mrs. Jere B. Nash, Jr., of Greenville, Mississippi. Income from the Fund is awarded each year on the basis of need and merit.

The Michael Grehl Scholarship was established in his memory by his late wife, Audrey, Scripps-Howard, family, and friends, to support deserving returning students who have financial need beyond the college’s financial aid package. Mr. Grehl was Editor of The Commercial Appeal, a Scripps-Howard newspaper.

The Hans and Frances Groenhoff Scholarship for Art and Art History Majors was established in memory of the world-famous photographer by his wife, the late Fran Groenhoff, and their friends. Recipients are limited to those students majoring in Art or Art History.

The Charles E. Guice Scholarship was established by members of the J.J. White Memorial Church and the Presbytery of South Mississippi.

The A. Arthur Halle Memorial Scholarship was established by trustees of the A. Arthur Halle Memorial Foundation, Memphis.

The James Hamilton Memorial Political Science Scholarship was established in his memory by gifts from Olivia Meyer Browne and is awarded to a deserving student.

The Hammond-Moore Scholarships were established by the late Mark B. Hammond, '39 and R. M. Hammond, Jr. in memory of their father, R. M. Hammond, and Dr. Moore Moore, both of Memphis.

The Dorothy Seymour Harnden Scholarship was established by the late Robert C. Harnden of Memphis in memory of his wife.

The Ethel Ashton Harrell '54 Scholarship, established by Dr. Harrell, gives preference to female students with documented financial need.

The Hassell Scholarship was provided through the estate of Pauline Hassell Nicholson to assist students from or near Wayne County, Tennessee.

The Rev. Robin R. and Daniel B. Hatzenbuehler Summer Ministry Fellowship for Social Justice was established in 2010 by this alumni couple of the class of 1971. It is awarded by competitive application in which students describe their interest and past involvement in ministry and social justice, as well as their aspirations for the impact of the fellowship and a proposed placement or project.

The William Randolph Hearst Scholarship, created by the William Randolph Hearst Foundation of New York, provides assistance to African-American students.

The Frank H. Heiss Scholarship Fund, established by the New York City law firm of Kelley Drye & Warren in memory of its distinguished law partner and 1928 alumnus of Rhodes, is supported by his daughter.

The Imelda and Hubert Henkel Scholarship was created in their memory by their four children, all of whom are Rhodes graduates: Mike '79 and Frances '79 Henkel, Tim Henkel '81, Keith '83 and Linda '83 Henkel, and Michelle Henkel '86.

The J. D. and Evelyn Henry Scholarship was established by the late Mr. J. D. Henry, Selma, Alabama, in grateful and loving memory of the family. His wife, the late Evelyn Henry, also provided support for this scholarship.

The Francis G. Hickman Scholarship was established by Edwyna Hickman, of Memphis, as a memorial to her husband. Preference is given to a student majoring, or intending to major, in the Department of Anthropology/Sociology.

The Harold “Chicken” High Scholarship honors this outstanding 1933 graduate of Rhodes and is funded by John S. and Tan Heslip Hille, '69, '69. Preference is given to an outstanding member of Pi Kappa Alpha.

The Chick and Andi Hill Service Fellowship was created in 2007 to provide aid to a student from Memphis with demonstrated financial need and commitment to community service and leadership.

The Hohenberg Foundation Scholarship is awarded to a student with financial need.

The Beth Bevill Hollingsworth Scholarship was established by her sons Cyril E. Hollingsworth '64 and Donald M. Hollingsworth '67 of Little Rock, Arkansas. Preference is given to a student with need.

The David Wills Hollingsworth Scholarship was established by The First Presbyterian Church, Florence, Alabama, to honor the memory of their longtime minister. Scholarships are awarded on the basis of financial need, with preference to students from Alabama.

The Emily How Holloway Scholarship was established in her memory by her husband, the late E. Thompson Holloway, Sr. '33, and children Emily H. Walker '64, and E. Thompson Holloway, Jr.

The Elizabeth Hart and Horace King Houston Memorial Scholarship was established by the Reverend Horace K. Houston, Jr. This scholarship is given to an active member of a Presbyterian Church who is a resident of Essex County, New Jersey; Washington County, Mississippi; or Shelby County, Tennessee.

The Gabriel and Mattie Houston Scholarship was established in 1955 by the late Mrs. Houston of Oxford, Mississippi.

The Margaret Mason Jones Houts and J. Thayer “Toto” Houts Scholarship was established by the late Mr. J. Thayer Houts '37 and his late wife, Mrs. Margaret Mason Jones Houts '40 of Memphis.

The Dave and Amy Howe Endowed Scholarship was established in 2016 by Amy and Dave Howe '83 P'19. This scholarship is awarded to students with financial need and selected on the basis of academic achievement and promise.

The Elizabeth J. Howard Scholarship was established by T. C. Howard of Covington, Tennessee, in 1937.

The S. Francis Howard Scholarship was established in 1979 by an anonymous donor in memory of Mr. S. Francis Howard '26.

The Thomas Percy Howard, Jr. Memorial Scholarship was established by members of the First Presbyterian Church of Tunica, Mississippi.

The John C. Hugon Scholarship was established by the late John C. Hugon '77 of Duncan, Oklahoma, during his lifetime to provide financial assistance to deserving students, perhaps in addition to that normally provided by the college. Additional funding was provided by McCasland Foundation, as well as family and friends.

The Joanne E. Hunt Memorial Scholarship was established by Mr. and Mrs. George B. Jones in memory of Mrs. Jones' daughter, an alumna of Rhodes, Class of 1960.

The Kristin D. and Vernon S. Hurst Scholarship for European Studies, established by alumna Kristin Dwelle Hurst '88 and her husband Vernon, provides aid for a Rhodes student participating in European Studies.

The Margaret Hyde Council International Scholarship for Women was established by the members of the Margaret Hyde Council to aid students in study abroad opportunities. It is also supported by alumnae and friends of Rhodes. Preference is given to women students.

The Margaret Hyde Leadership Scholarship was created by Margaret Hyde Council board members Theresa Cloys Carl '75, Susan Logan Huffman '83, and Joellyn Forrester Sullivan '77. It gives preference to upperclass women who have demonstrated leadership in campus organizations, community service, or academics.

The Wendy and Bill Jacoway Scholarship was created by alumnus William H. Jacoway '62 and his wife Wendy.

The Sarah Elizabeth Farris and Thomas Francis Jackson Scholarship was established by Mrs. Elizabeth Jackson Hall and her son, T. Francis Jackson, III '62.

The Reverend William Nathan Jenkins Scholarship was established by his wife, the late Pearl C. Jenkins and his daughter, Miss Annie Tait Jenkins of Crystal Springs, Mississippi, to honor Mr. Jenkins, a Presbyterian minister and a member of Rhodes Class of 1895.

The Jane and J. L. Jerden Service Scholarship was established by Jane and J. L. Jerden '59 of Atlanta, Georgia. It provides aid to students who have demonstrated experience in and commitment to community service.

The Johnson Family Scholarship, created by alumnus Barry Johnson '83 and his wife Susanna Johnson, gives preference for aid to a student who exhibits an interest in religious studies as a major or entering full-time Christian ministry following graduation.

The George R. Johnson Service Scholarship, was created by Susanna Johnson in 2005 as a gift to her husband, Barry D. Johnson '83, to honor his father who dedicated his life to serving others. The scholarship provides aid to students who have demonstrated experience in and commitment to community service.

The Marshall P. Jones '59 Scholarship, funded through a bequest from Lawrence & Carrie Jaseph, honors their late son-in-law and Rhodes Professor Emeritus. It is awarded to a student with financial need with preference given to a minority student. Mr. Jones’ widow, Lynn Jaseph Jones '59, also provides support for this scholarship.

The Paul Tudor Jones, M.D., Scholarship and The Annie M. Smith Jones Scholarship were established by the Jones family in memory of their parents.

The Walk C. Jones, Jr. Scholarship was established by Mrs. Walk C. Jones, Jr. of Memphis.

The Paul Tudor Jones III and Sara Shelton Jones Scholarship was established to honor the memory of his parents by the estate of the late Paul Tudor Jones IV '32, life trustee. Primary emphasis for selection of the recipients is based upon the student’s genuine religious nature and integrity of character.

The Henry M. and Lena Meyer Kahn Scholarship was created through the will of Jacob M. Meyer of Memphis.

The Estes Kefauver Memorial Scholarships were endowed by friends of Senator Kefauver, United States Representative, 1938-1948, and United States Senator, 1949-1963.

The Laurence F. Kinney Scholarship is named for the beloved Rhodes Professor of Religion. It was established in his memory by Mrs. Kinney.

The Edward B. Klewer Scholarship was established by Dorothy Hughes Klewer in memory of her husband.

The Hope Brewster Krushkov Memorial Scholarship in Music, created by her daughter Marli Krushkova, is awarded to a student in music.

The Riea and Steve Lainoff Fellowship was established in 2010 by trustee Steve Lainoff and his wife Riea. It is awarded annually to ten or more students through a competitive application process which includes a brief discussion of how the proposed domestic or international fellowship will advance the student’s experiential learning. Preference is given to juniors and seniors with at least two fellowships reserved for each of the Theatre and English Departments.

The Joseph S. Legg Memorial Service Scholarship was established in 2005 by Rhodes trustee Deborah Legg Craddock '80 and Robert E. Craddock, Jr. It provides financial aid for deserving students who have demonstrated financial need as well as experience with and commitment to community service.

The Edward B. and Elizabeth LeMaster Scholarship was provided in memory of her parents by trustee Elizabeth LeMaster Simpson '58 and her late husband David L. Simpson, III '58. It is awarded annually to students with financial need to participate in Rhodes-sponsored European Studies, in Rhodes' exchange programs, or approved programs in the U.S.

The Jackie & Herbert S. Liebman and Marjorie Liebman Scholarship was given by the Liebmans to provide aid for a student from Shelby County with financial need.

The Cornelia Loper Lipscomb Music Scholarship was established by Edward L. Lipscomb of Memphis, father of Nell Lipscomb Martin and alumnae Martha Lipscomb Whitla '57 and Lynda Lipscomb Wexler '60, in memory of his wife and their mother. Preference is given to a female music student from a Southern state.

The Edward H. Little Endowed Scholarship was provided by the E. H. Little Trust.

The Mahoney Family Student Emergency Assistance Fund was established in 2009 by Wendi and Robert Mahoney, parents of Alex Mahoney '08 and Nate Mahoney '11, to be awarded in the event of financial crisis to students who are active and successful members of the Rhodes community and who demonstrate a need for emergency assistance as determined and selected by college committee.

The Robert Mann '47 Scholarship was provided through a bequest to provide financial aid for music students.

The James J. and Ada Manson Memorial Scholarship was established by their daughter, the late Lucille Manson Tate of New Orleans, and the First Presbyterian Church of New Orleans.

The Roma and Jeff A. Marmon, Jr. Memorial Scholarships were established by Mr. and Mrs. George Mallouk of Garden City, New York, and other friends and relatives. He was a member of the Class of 1939.

The Edward C. Martin, Jr. Scholarship was funded through the estate of Mr. Martin '41. It is awarded to deserving students with financial need.

The Ireys Martin Scholarship, established by the Association of Rhodes Women, is awarded to a qualified female student.

The Lina Matthews Service Scholarship was established in 2006 through the estate of Lina Matthews. Preference is given to Presbyterian students studying for ministry or other work in the church and who have demonstrated experience in and commitment to community service.

The Mona Rice Matthews CODA Fellowship was funded by the estate of Mona Rice Matthews in 2007. It provides aid to deserving students participating in the Center for Outreach in the Development of the Arts at Rhodes. The program fosters leadership, vision, communications and innovation for future leaders in the fine arts.

The Maxwell Family Scholarship was established in memory of Mr. and Mrs. J. B. Maxwell of Dyersburg, Tennessee, by members of their family. Preference is given to students from Dyersburg or West Tennessee.

The May Scholarship of Second Presbyterian Church of Little Rock, Arkansas, is provided through the proceeds of the Ruth May Gibb Trust as administered by Second Presbyterian Church, Little Rock, Arkansas. Preference is given to Arkansas students, with consideration given to financial need, academic achievement, and educational goals of the student.

The Carolyn McAfee Annual Fine Arts Fellowship, established by Carolyn T. McAfee in 2008, is awarded to a student with talent or interest in the fine arts, with a preference for music. Preference is given to students from West Tennessee.

The Robert D. McCallum Scholarship was created in honor of the late Robert D. McCallum, life trustee of Rhodes, by his friend Julian Robertson. Preference is given to students with partial financial need, and awarded on the basis of the students' high ethical values, leadership ability, and academic performance. The purpose of the scholarships is to enable middle-income students who meet these criteria to get a Rhodes education.

The Gail McClay Scholarship was established in her memory by family, colleagues, and former students. Gail McClay was Associate Professor and Chair of the Education Department until her death in 1999. The scholarship benefits students in education with demonstrated financial need.

The William E. McClure '51 Service Scholarship was funded through the estate of William E. McClure '51. The scholarship is awarded to students who commit to performing ten hours of community service weekly.

The William '51 and Helen '51 McClure Study Abroad Fellowship was created in 2010 to honor her late parents by Dr.Catherine McClure Leslie and the Helen and William McClure Family Fund at the Community Foundation of Greater Memphis. It provides for assistance to an upperclass student majoring in commerce and business to study abroad in a Rhodes-approved program.

The Anna Leigh McCorkle Work Study Scholarship was established by her family and friends to provide on-campus employment of students.

The McCoy Service Scholarship was founded in 2004 by the McCoy Foundation.

The Seth and Mary Ann McGaughran Scholarship for Creative Writing, established by Mr. and Mrs. McGaughran, is awarded to a deserving student with interest and ability in creative writing and who resides within 150 miles of Memphis.

The McGehee Scholarship was established by James E. McGehee & Company, Memphis. Priority is given to residents of Shelby County. Achievement, rather than need, is the principal consideration.

The John H. McMinn Scholarship was established by alumnus John H. McMinn III '68 of Miami, Florida.

The Phillip H. McNeill Family Scholarship was established in 2005 by Rhodes trustee Phillip H. McNeill and Mabel McCall McNeill, parents of Hallie McNeill Ward '96. The scholarship provides opportunities to outstanding students who demonstrate strength of character and commitment to their faith through leadership and involvement in community, church, or school.

The Louise Howry McRae Fine Arts Scholarship was established in 2005 through the estates of Louise Howry McRae '43 and Robert McRae of Memphis. It provides financial aid for deserving students who are majoring in the fine arts and who have demonstrated experience and commitment to community service.

The Hilda Menke Scholarship was established by Milton and Elizabeth Picard and by Hubert and Stella Menke in memory of Mr. Menke's mother. The recipient is a deserving student from the Mid-South area.

The Frederick J. Menz Scholarship is supported by Douglas W. Menz '82 in memory of his father.

The Frances Jeter Michaelcheck Scholarship Program established in 2015 by William J. Michaelcheck '69 in honor of his mother seeks to enroll, challenge and graduate students who can contribute and take full advantage of Rhodes. Preference given to students from Western Tennessee who demonstrate high financial need, commitment to service and leadership in their school or community, and has a willingness to work hard and learn from difficult circumstances.

The Evelyn G. Millsap '47 Service Scholarship was created in 2005 through the estate of alumni Evelyn G. Millsap. It provides financial aid for deserving students who have demonstrated experience and commitment to community service.

The Kimberley S. Millsaps Scholarship was established by Mr. and Mrs. Kenneth E. Millsaps, with their family and friends, in memory of their daughter Kimberley Millsaps '90 who was Injured In a car accident during her senior year at Rhodes. The scholarship is awarded annually to a rising senior who is a member of the Alpha Omega Pi Sorority.

The Frank M. Mitchener, Sr. Scholarship was established during their lifetimes by his daughters, Frances M. Scott '33 and Mary Rose M. Wilds, and his wife, Mrs. Frank M. Mitchener, Sr. of Sumner, Mississippi.

The Edward A. Mohns Scholarship was endowed by the late Dr. Edward A. Mohns '24, Portland, Oregon, and his family to give financial support to students preparing for careers in the ministry or medicine.

The Pamela Palmer Montesi Scholarship for the Arts was a gift from Pamela Palmer Montesi '80 and her husband, Frederick Thomas Montesi, III, and their two children, Pamela Nicole Montesi and Frederick Thomas Montesi, IV '06 in honor of Pam's 25th Class Reunion in 2005. The scholarship aids students who demonstrate a love of the arts, regardless of academic major, with preference given to a student of music or the theatre. Primary emphasis for the selection of the recipients is based upon the student’s genuine religious nature and integrity of character.

The Lewis Matthew Moore Scholarship was created in 1947 by Ethel Dean Moore in memory of her son. Preference is given to a student from Alabama.

The Mayo Moore Scholarship was established by the Tunica County Rotary Club.

The Virginia Lee Moore Scholarship, established by a Rhodes staff member in memory of her mother, is awarded to students with need.

The Goodbar Morgan '31 Scholarship was established in 2006 through the estate of Terry Westbrook '66. Goodbar Morgan was Director of Alumni at Rhodes for 26 years prior to serving as the college archivist in his “retirement.” He and Dr. Westbrook were both members of Sigma Nu Fraternity and preference is given to the most qualified member of Sigma Nu Fraternity.

The William Insley Morris Memorial Scholarship was established by his sister Rosanna Morris '41. Mr. Morris served in the navy at various weather stations around the world.

The Norvelle Hammett and Adolphus B. Morton Scholarship was established by their daughter and son-in-law, Mr. and Mrs. A. D. Wilhelm, parents of alumnus Jack Wilhelm '75.

The Murfree Service Scholarship was established in 2005 by Rhodes trustee Katherine Davis Murfree. It provides financial aid for deserving students who have demonstrated financial need as well as experience with and commitment to community service.

The Sanford Alvin Myatt, M.D. Scholarship was established by Mrs. Lewis J. Myatt of Memphis in memory of her son, a member of the Class of 1966. Preference is given to a junior or senior pre-medical student.

The Fred W. Neal Scholarship was established by family and friends of the late Dr. Neal, Professor Emeritus of Religious Studies.

The Hugh M. Neely Scholarships were established by the late Mrs. Mary Sneed Neely, Memphis.

The Joe Neville Scholarships are sponsored by the Black Alumni Connection of the Rhodes Alumni Association in honor of Joe Neville, who worked in the Rhodes Physical Plant for 44 years. Mr. Neville was always there for Rhodes students with abiding friendship, encouragement and inspiration. The scholarship provides support for the emergency needs of minority students that exceed the college financial aid package.

The William Lucian Oates Scholarship was created in 1965 by the late Hugo N. Dixon of Memphis.

The 100 Club of Memphis Scholarship was endowed by the 100 Club of Memphis to assist Memphis and Shelby County law enforcement officers, firefighters, and their immediate family members.

The T. Russell Nunan and Cora Clark Nunan Scholarship was established in 2007 through the estates of Dr. and Mrs. Nunan. Preference is given to a student who is a member of the First Presbyterian Church of Greenville, Mississippi, or a student from Washington County, Mississippi.

The Edmund Orgill Scholarship was established by his friends in recognition of his outstanding church, civic, and educational services, and is awarded to students who have given evidence of interest in and concern for governmental processes.

The Ortmann-Cox Memorial Scholarship was established by the will of Bessie Cox Ortmann.

The John A. and Ruth C. Osoinach Memorial Scholarship was provided by the estate of Dr. Harrison Kirkland Osoinach '55 to support students of Native American ancestry or other minorities.

The George Marion Painter Memorial Scholarship was established by the First Presbyterian Church of Gallatin, Tennessee, and by Mrs. George M. Painter of Gallatin and Mrs. Priscilla Early of Memphis. Preference is given to students majoring in commerce and business, mathematics, or public education.

The P. Thomas Parrish '70 Service Scholarship was established in 2004 by his classmates and friends.

The May Thompson Patton Music Scholarship was established by Lynda Lipscomb Wexler '60 to honor her mother-in-law and is awarded to a student majoring in music.

The Elizabeth Roe Pearce '91 International Study Fellowship was established in 2008 by Elizabeth Roe Pearce '91. This fellowship will be awarded to students participating in a study abroad opportunity on the basis of demonstrated financial need with a minimum required grade point average of 2.75.

The Bettye M. Pedersen Scholarship was established by Martha I. Pedersen '70 in memory of her mother. Preference is given to students with need who are from small towns in Tennessee, have declared an art, music, or science major, and intend to teach at some level.

The Israel H. Peres Scholarship was established by the late Hardwig Peres, LL.D. of Memphis, and friends of the late Israel H. Peres, former Chancellor in Memphis’ Chancery Court. The scholarship is awarded to residents of Shelby County.

The Liz and Milton Picard Scholarship was created through gifts from Elizabeth Tamm Picard and her late husband.

The Mrs. Ruth C. Pickens Fellowship was established in 2007 by trustee Robert R. Waller and Sarah Pickens Waller '63 to support minority students who have potential for success at Rhodes. They must demonstrate financial need, show leadership potential and commit to participation in campus and/or community outreach activities.

The Clarence E. Pigford Scholarship was established by Mrs. Clarence E. Pigford of Jackson, Tennessee, to honor her husband who was a trustee of Rhodes College.

The Frances Pillow Memorial Fund was established in memory of Frances Pillow '72 by her family and friends. The fund is used to provide scholarships for Arkansas students.

The Olive Manson Pitcher Scholarship was established in her memory by Elizabeth O. Pagaud of New Orleans.

The Julia and Moses Plough Scholarships were established by the late Mr. Abe Plough in memory of his parents.

The William B. Power Scholarship was established by the Dixie Wax Paper Company of Memphis. Preference is given to students connected with DIXICO, as the company is now named, or to students from Canada.

The Mary Louise Pritchard '51 Scholarship was given at her 50th Class Reunion by Mrs. Pritchard in memory of Elizabeth Ann Pritchard and Patricia Barton Pritchard and in honor of Mary Louise Crawford.

The Morton D. and Elsie Prouty Scholarship was established by Mr. and Mrs. Morton D. Prouty of Florence, Alabama. Mr. Prouty was a member of Rhodes Board of Trustees.

The Schuyler Harris Pryor Scholarship was created by his mother, Mrs. Lutie Patton Shaw.

The Lynn Elizabeth Pyeatt Memorial Scholarship was established by her parents, Mr. and Mrs. Wayne W. Pyeatt, Memphis, Tennessee; her grandmother, Mrs. Lillian Pyeatt, Searcy, Arkansas; and by her friends. Income from the fund is awarded to women students majoring in music who have been nominated for this award by the Music Department and to a student majoring in mathematics.


The William C. “Razz” Rasberry '30 Scholarship was established by Doris Rasberry Jones '59 in honor of her father, Rhodes alumnus and life trustee. The scholarship is awarded to students with financial need.

The Red Shoes Service Scholarship was established by an anonymous alumna in 2006. It is awarded to students who demonstrate experience with and commitment to community service and leadership.

The Lieutenant Russell E. Reeves, Jr. Scholarship was established by his parents, Mrs. Russell E. Reeves and the late Mr. Reeves, Memphis. The income from this fund assists a worthy male student.

The Lorna Anderson Reimers Scholarship was established through her bequest. She was a Rhodes trustee from Jackson, MS.

The Linda Williams Rhea Scholarship was established by the late Herbert Rhea, Rhodes trustee emeritus, during his lifetime in honor of his wife.The Percy M. and Ramona R. Rhea Scholarship was created in honor of his parents by Rhodes trustee Randall R. Rhea '77. It benefits students of high academic ability with demonstrated financial need.

The Margaret Johnson Ridolphi '63 Scholarship was endowed by Meg and Scott Crosby in 2013 to honor Meg’s mother at her 50th Reunion. The scholarship is created to enroll, challenge and graduate students who can contribute and take full advantage of Rhodes.

The Alice Archer Rhodes Scholarship was established by the Association of Rhodes Women. Preference is given to a qualified female student.

Rhodes Service Scholarships are awarded to students who have demonstrated an exceptional record of leadership and service participation in their communities and who wish to become effective leaders who promote positive change in the world. They are provided through an endowment established by the Robert and Ruby Priddy Charitable Trust, Wichita, Texas.

The Rich Memorial International Scholarship, created by alumna Mary Jack Rich McCord '51, provides aid for study abroad to students with demonstrated financial need. Preference is given to women students.

The Richardson CODA Scholarship was established by the late Kathleen Richardson in 2007. It provides aid to deserving students participating in the Center for Outreach in the Development of the Arts at Rhodes. The program fosters leadership, vision, communications and innovation for future leaders in the fine arts.

The Kathleen Richardson Scholarship was provided in 2007 by the estate of Mrs. Richardson of Memphis. The scholarship serves to aid students with demonstrated financial need.

The Eleanor Richmond and Jessie Richmond Hooper Scholarship was established by family and friends. Ms. Richmond was a member of the Class of 1927 and Ms. Hooper the Class of 1935.

The Dr. and Mrs. F. Ray Riddle, Jr. CODA Scholarship was established by F. Ray Riddle, Jr. in 2007. It provides aid to deserving students participating in the Center for Outreach in the Development of the Arts at Rhodes. The program fosters leadership, vision, communications and innovation for future leaders in the fine arts.

The Lou Anna Robbins Scholarship was established by Jess H. Robbins of Dyersburg, Tennessee. Preference is given to a student from First Presbyterian Church, Dyersburg, or a student from Dyer County.

The Martha Robinson CODA Scholarship was established in 2007 through the termination of the Martha Robinson Charitable Remainder Trust. It provides aid to deserving students participating in the Center for Outreach in the Development of the Arts at Rhodes. The program fosters leadership, vision, communications and innovation for future leaders in the fine arts.

The John F. Rockett Scholarship was created in 1991 in his memory through gifts from family, business associates, and friends. The scholarship is awarded to a junior or senior athlete who plans to attend medical school.

The Anne L. Rorie/Chi Omega Scholarship was established in her memory by her parents, Dr. and Mrs. J. E. Rorie. and by her friends and fellow students. Anne was a member of the Class of 1982.

The William M. Rosson Scholarship in Physics was established in 1989 to honor Conwood Corporation President, William Rosson. The scholarship is awarded to a student majoring in physics.

The Lucy W. Rowe Scholarship was provided by the late Mrs. Lucy W. Rowe and her daughter, Mrs. William R. Carrington Jones, Memphis.

The Jules B. Rozier Scholarships were established by the late Mr. Jules B. Rozier, Memphis.

The Theo Matthews Hayden and Marjorie Matthews Russell Study Abroad Scholarship was funded by the estate of Marjorie M. Russell in 2008. The scholarship will be awarded to Rhodes students who wish to study abroad in Scotland.

The Theo Matthews Hayden and Marjorie Matthews Russell Scholarship was funded by the estate of Marjorie M. Russell in 2008. It is to be awarded to a student from Scotland who wishes to attend Rhodes College. If no student from Scotland qualifies in any given year, then the scholarship will be awarded to a student with demonstrated financial need.

The John Hunt Rutledge II Scholarship was provided by friends in memory of this outstanding leader from the Class of 1972.

The Schadt Foundation Scholarship is provided by the Schadt Foundation of Memphis to benefit a student with financial need.

The Billie J. Scharding Scholarship was established through a bequest of Mrs. Scharding.

The Mary Gideon Schillig '47 CODA Scholarship was funded by the estate of Mary Gideon Schillig in 2007. It provides aid to deserving students participating in the Center for Outreach in the Development of the Arts at Rhodes. The program fosters leadership, vision, communications and innovation for future leaders in the fine arts.

The Stephen J. Schmidt, Jr. Scholarship was provided for students with need by the late Mr. Schmidt, Class of 1972.

The Dr. and Mrs. Perry D. Scrivner Scholarship was established by the late Mrs. Lucretia H. Scrivner of Lawton, Oklahoma. This scholarship is to be awarded to a worthy student interested in education as a profession.

The Josephine Gilfillan Seabrook '42 and Conrad L. Seabrook CODA Scholarship was established in 2007. It provides aid to deserving students participating in the Center for Outreach in the Development of the Arts at Rhodes. The program fosters leadership, vision, communications and innovation for future leaders in the fine arts.

The Second Presbyterian Church, Memphis, Scholarships are funded by Second Presbyterian Church. Preference is given to members of Second Presbyterian Church and members of churches affiliated with the Evangelical Presbyterian Church.

A Service Scholarship was established in 2006 by an anonymous donor to support Bonner Service Scholars.

The Madhuri and Devchand Shah Scholarship was created in 2013 by Vimal Shah '94, in honor of his parents. The scholarship is awarded to a minority student from a lower income family.

The Elder L. Shearon, Jr. Scholarship was created by The Southern Company to honor its late president and goes to a student with financial need.

The Charles R. and Rebecca L. Sherman Service Scholarship was established in 2005 by Charles '35 and Rebecca '38 in memory of their respective parents, Charles Robert Sherman and Rosa Livingston Sherman, and Judge Harry Williamson Laughlin and Frances Weber Laughlin. The scholarship is awarded to students who demonstrate experience in and commitment to community service.

The Anne and Mary Shewmaker Scholarship was established through the estate of Mary Shewmaker in 2006 to aid students with demonstrated financial need. Preference is given to female graduates of Central High School, Memphis.

The Clare Orman Shields '73 Scholarship was initiated in her memory by Louise Allen ‘77 and Jan Cornaghie. Additional funding was provided by her late husband, Lynn Shields, as well as family and classmates. It provides aid to women students with financial need. Clare Shields was a great advocate for women, having been both a pioneer and a role model for women in the legal community.

The Shiland/Park Scholarship was established in 2013 by Patricia Shiland P'15 and James Park P'15 to enroll, challenge and graduate talented students from middle income families who demonstrate an entrepreneurial spirit.

The Charles M. Simmons '09 Fellowship was established in 2009 by his parents, Jan and Tom Simmons, and The Bea and Margaret Love Foundation. This scholarship supports a student from Texas with academic promise and a commitment to learning outside of the classroom through an internship, service, study abroad, or research experience.

The David L. Simpson III '58 Scholarship was established in 2009 in his memory by his wife, trustee Elizabeth LeMaster Simpson '58, to benefit students with need from middle income families.

The Robert and Seabelle Simono Scholarship was provided by Judith Simono Durff '66 and Thomas H. Durff '65 to honor her parents. The scholarship is awarded to students with need from Mississippi.

The Cindy and John Sites Scholarship was created by John Sites '74 and his wife Cindy of New York. This scholarship is awarded based on academic merit of the student.

The Leland Smith Emergency Assistance Fund was established in his memory by James N. Augustine '89 and his wife, Tanya Augustine, in 2008. The Fund provides emergency assistance to students beyond the college’s normal financial aid package.

The Katherine Hinds Smythe Scholarship was provided by Katherine Hinds Smythe '53 to assist deserving students who face financial crises which threaten their return to Rhodes. Preference is given to female students.

The Paul Snodgrass '46 CODA Scholarship was established through his estate. It provides aid to deserving students participating in the Center for Outreach in the Development of the Arts at Rhodes. The program fosters leadership, vision, communications and innovation for future leaders in the fine arts.

The William Spandow Scholarship in Chemistry was established by the late Mrs. Florence Gage Spandow, Memphis. This scholarship is awarded to a senior majoring in chemistry whose previous record indicates graduation with academic honors or with honors research.

The William Spandow Scholarship in Mathematics was established by the late Mrs. Florence Gage Spandow, Memphis. This scholarship is awarded to a senior majoring in mathematics who is a candidate for the degree with academic honors or with honors research.

The William Spandow Scholarship in Physics was established by the late Mrs. Florence Gage Spandow, Memphis. This scholarship is awarded to a senior majoring in physics who is a candidate for the degree with academic honors or with honors research.

The C. L. and Mildred W. Springfield Honor Scholarship was established by Mr. James F. Springfield '51 of Memphis to honor his mother and his father, who was for many years Comptroller of the college.

The James F. Springfield, Jr. '87 CODA Scholarship was established in 2006 by James F. Springfield, Sr. '51 in honor of his son. It aids deserving students participating in the Center for Outreach in the Development of the Arts at Rhodes. The program fosters leadership, vision, communications and innovation for future leaders in the arts.

The Virgil Starks, III '85 Memorial Scholarship was established in 2013 by his friends for students from the state of Alabama pursuing a career in medicine, law, teaching, or theology.

The Mark Lee Stephens Scholarship was established in his memory by his parents. This award goes to a rising sophomore majoring in Theatre. Mark was a member of the Class of 1988.

The Edward Norrel Stewart Scholarship, created by the late Dr. Ellen Davies-Rodgers, is awarded to a student in commerce and business.

The Tommye Virginia Stewart '53 Scholarship was established by the alumna's sister, Mrs. Dorothy Shepherd, for deserving students with need.

The Dr. Thomas E. and Peggy C. Strong Scholarship was established by family and friends on the occasion of his retirement from medical practice. Dr. and Mrs. Strong, members of the classes of 1954 and 1955, have subsequently increased the value of the Strong Scholarship through their own gifts. It is awarded to students with financial need selected on the basis of academic achievement and promise.

The Sudderth Scholarship, established by the friends and family of Dr. Brian Sudderth '77, is awarded to a student who demonstrates outstanding academic and leadership qualities as well as a desire to serve those in need through practice in the “learned professions” of medicine, law, and/or theology.

The Warren Ware Sullivan Memorial Scholarship was established by his father, Mr. H. P. Sullivan, Walls, Mississippi, and friends of the family.

The SunTrust Bank Fellowship is provided to support deserving students with financial need. Preference is given to Memphis students.

The Gene Dickson Symes Scholarship was established by members of Webster Groves Presbyterian Church, Webster Groves, Missouri, in honor of their Organist Emeritus, the late Gene Dickson Symes '45.

The Jack H. Taylor Fellowship in Physics was created in 2005 by alumnus Charles W. Robertson, Jr. '65 and his wife Patricia K. Robertson. From 1956 to 1992, Dr. Jack H. Taylor '44 served on the Rhodes faculty as Professor of Physics. Dr. Robertson was inspired by Dr. Taylor and pursued a very successful career in physics after graduation. The fellowship, restricted to students studying physics, is awarded through application and competitive process based on academic and scientific achievements as well as interest and aptitude for the study of physics.

The Jack H. Taylor Scholarship was established in 2000 by Harry L. Swinney '61 in honor of his Rhodes mentor, Jack H. Taylor '44, Professor Emeritus of Physics. The scholarship is restricted to students majoring in the physical and biological sciences.

The Mary Allie Taylor Scholarship was created through the will of Miss Taylor, Class of 1933.

The Tennessee Churches Scholarship was funded by the Presbyterian Churches of Tennessee and the Synod of Tennessee in the mid-1970's. Preference is given to a Presbyterian student.

The James H. Thomas III '62 Service Scholarship was established in 2005 by an anonymous alumnus to provide financial aid for deserving students who have demonstrated financial need as well as experience with and commitment to community service.

The Whit Thomas Scholarship was established in his memory by the Sigma Nu Fraternity Epsilon Sigma Chapter at Rhodes.

The Edward F. Thompson Scholarship Fund was established by the late Mr. Thompson, a member of Rhodes Class of 1929 and retired economist with Union Planters Bank of Memphis.

The Frances Tigrett Service Scholarship was funded through the estate of Frances Tigrett of Jackson, Tennessee. The scholarship is awarded to students who commit to performing ten hours of community service weekly.

The Elizabeth '04 and Sarah '07 Townsend Family Scholarship was established in 2008 by their parents Deborah and Darrell Townsend of Nashville, Tennessee. It is awarded to a student with demonstrated financial need.

The Bill and Carole Troutt Scholarship was established in 2007 by Dr. and Mrs. Troutt to support a middle-income student from West Tennessee who otherwise would be unable to attend Rhodes.

The Henry and Lynne Turley RIRS Fellowship was created by Henry and Lynne Turley in 2010 to support the Rhodes Institute for Regional Studies (RIRS) for four years. Each year, The Turley Fellowship will provide funding for one RIRS faculty member and will support three RIRS Fellows, including research and travel funds to aid these students in their individual research projects.

The Frank L. Turner '50 CODA Scholarship was funded in 2010 through his estate. It provides aid to deserving students participating in the Center for Outreach in the Development of the Arts at Rhodes. Theprogram fosters leadership, vision, communications and innovation for future leaders in the fine arts.

The UT Neuroscience Student Research Fellowship was established in 2006 by James T. Robertson '53 to support an outstanding student in the physical sciences who is selected to pursue summer research activities in neuroscience at the University of Tennessee Center for the Health Sciences.

The Douglas L. Viar Memorial Scholarship was established in 2013 by Michelle Viar '94 in memory of her father. The scholarship will provide critical aid to students who unexpectedly require financial help to complete their Rhodes education.

The Emma Dean Voorhies Boys Club Scholarship was established by the Boys Club of Memphis to provide assistance to a Boys Club member.

The Debby and John Wallace III '75 Service Scholarship was established by trustee John M. Wallace III '75 and his wife Debby. It provides aid to students who have demonstrated experience in and commitment to community service.

The Edith Wright Wallace '44 Scholarship was established in her memory by her mother, the late Ethel Winfrey Wright. It is awarded to students with need. Mrs. Wallace was a Latin teacher in the Memphis City Schools for 34 years prior to her death in 1978.

The Dr. Robert R. and Sarah Pickens Waller Scholarship was established by alumna Sarah Waller '63 and her husband, trustee Robert Waller.

The Harry B. Watkins, Jr. Memorial Scholarship was created by the First Presbyterian Church of Dyersburg, Tennessee.

The Henry C. Watkins Scholarship was established by Mr. Edmund Orgill, C.I.T. Financial Services, and C.I.T. executives.

The Dr. and Mrs. Paul McLauren Watson Scholarship was established with a gift during their lifetimes from Rose Lynn Barnard Watson '38 and Lauren Watson '37 of Memphis.

The Rev. Dr. Roy Edwards Watts '25 and Margaret Vincent Watts '25 CODA Scholarship was established by in 2007 through their estates. It provides aid to deserving students participating in the Center for Outreach in the Development of the Arts at Rhodes. The program fosters leadership, vision, communications and innovation for future leaders in the fine arts.

The Norma Webb Scholarship was created in 2013 by Norma Webb '52 to support students with need.

The Walker Wellford, Jr. Scholarship was established in his honor by his wife, the late Minnie Lundy Wellford '29, and is awarded to a deserving student. The late Mr. Wellford '29 was secretary of the Board of Trustees from 1957 to 1961.

The Terry E. Westbrook '66 Scholarship for International Study was established in 2006 through Dr. Westbrook's estate. It provides aid to deserving students with demonstrated financial need to engage in study abroad.

The Gordon White Scholarship was established by his sister, the late Mrs. Lizzie Gordon White Hood, Nashville, Tennessee.

The Mary Kennedy Lane White Scholarship was established by Mrs. Alice B. Buell. It is restricted to a student from Giles County, Tennessee.

The Thomas J. White, Jr. '39 Scholarship, established in 2011 through his estate, provides need-based aid to deserving students.

The Lettie Pate Whitehead Scholarships are awarded on an annual basis by the Lettie Pate Whitehead Foundation of Atlanta. These scholarships are awarded to deserving female students from nine southern states named by the Foundation.

The Charles B. Wiggin and Aileen Smith Wiggen Scholarship was established in 2004 through the estate of Aileen N. Wiggin of Meridian, Mississippi. Preference is given to students who are Mississippi residents.

The Russel S. and Theresa L. Wilkinson Scholarship was established by a friend of Mr. Wilkinson to provide scholarship assistance to students attending Rhodes.

The Anne Marie Williford Emergency Aid Fund was established in 2009 by an anonymous alumna to provide aid in the event of financial crisis to students who are active and successful members of the Rhodes community and who demonstrate a need for emergency assistance as determined and selected by college committee.

The Jane Wittichen Williams and Ernest B. Williams III Scholarship, provided by alumna Mrs. Williams '52 and her husband, gives preference for aid to upperclassmen who exhibit a commitment to community service.

The M. J. Williams Scholarship honors the former Director of Finance at Rhodes.

The Jim and Jackie Williamson Scholarship was created by James C. Williamson '50 and Jacqueline Newman Williamson '52 in honor of their 50th class reunions.

The Kemmons Wilson Family Foundation Service Scholarship was established in 2006 by The Kemmons Wilson Family Foundation. Selection is based on the student’s academic performance, leadership ability, and involvement in his or her high school community. As part of scholarship requirements, recipients will participate in community service and leadership programs while enrolled at Rhodes.

The Spence L. Wilson Service Scholarship was created in 2005 by the then Chair of Rhodes Board of Trustees, Spence L. Wilson and his wife Rebecca Webb Wilson. It provides financial aid for deserving students who have demonstrated financial need as well as experience with and commitment to community service.

The B. Oliver Wood Scholarship was established by Mr. and Mrs. B. Oliver Wood, Jr. of Midland, Texas, in memory of his father, an alumnus in the Class of 1915.

The Marjorie '39 and Al '39 Wunderlich Scholarship was established in 2008 by Al Wunderlich and his late wife, Marjorie Jennings Wunderlich. It is awarded to a deserving student with demonstrated financial need.

The Mrs. Grey S. Wurtsbaugh Scholarship is awarded to a student with financial need with preference given to students from Shreveport, Louisiana.

The John Thomas Wurtsbaugh Scholarship was established by Mrs. John Thomas Wurtsbaugh of Shreveport, Louisiana, in memory of her husband.

Faculty

The Faculty

Rhodes’ strength as a distinguished college of the liberal arts and sciences is dependent on an exceptionally able student body and a faculty of effective teachers and committed scholars. College planning, including curriculum and academic facilities, is done with the objective of making it possible for students and faculty to create an imaginative and challenging learning experience.

Rhodes recruits faculty members who demonstrate excellent teaching and who show promise of continued and significant scholarly activity. The College also depends on the Faculty to provide leadership not only in academic development for the College but also in the overall governance of the institution. In the section of this bulletin titled “The Educational Program”, the members of each academic department are named with year of appointment, area specialties, and additional educational background information.

The College is justifiably proud of the accomplishments of its Faculty. In particular, the Clarence Day Award for Outstanding Teaching, the Clarence Day Award for Research and Creative Activity, and the Jameson M. Jones Outstanding Faculty Service Award are given to those individuals judged as deserving of special recognition. Award winners have been as follows:

Clarence Day Award for Outstanding Teaching

1981 Dr. Jack U. Russell, Mathematics
1982 Dr. Marshall E. McMahon, Economics
1983 Dr. William Larry Lacy, Philosophy
1984 Dr. James M. Vest, French
1985 Dr. Fred W. Neal, Religious Studies
1986 Dr. E. Llewellyn Queener, Psychology
1987 Dr. Rebecca Sue Legge, Business Administration
1988 Dr. Terry W. Hill, Biology
1989 Dr. F. Michael McLain, Religious Studies
1990 Dr. Cynthia Marshall, English
1991 Dr. William T. Jolly, Classics
1992 Dr. G. Kenneth Williams, Mathematics
1993 Dr. Jennifer Brady, English
1994 Dr. Horst R. Dinkelacker, Modern Languages and Literatures
1995 Dr. Carolyn R. Jaslow, Biology
1996 Professor Julia Ewing, Theatre
1997 Dr. Bradford D. Pendley, Chemistry
1998 Dr. Ellen T. Armour, Religious Studies
1999 Dr. Michael R. Drompp, History
2000 Dr. Brian W. Shaffer, English
2001 Dr. Stephen R. Haynes, Religious Studies
2002 Dr. Marshall Boswell, English
2003 Dr. Brent Hoffmeister, Physics
2004 Dr. Timothy S. Huebner, History
2005 Dr. Stephen J. Ceccoli, International Studies
2006 Dr. Tina Barr, English
2007 Dr. Patrick Shade, Philosophy
2008 Dr. Mark W. Muesse, Religious Studies
2009 Dr. P. Eric Henager, Modern Languages and Literatures
2010 Dr. Gordon Bigelow, English
2011 Dr. Bernadette McNary-Zak, Religious Studies
2012 Dr. Luther D. Ivory, Religious Studies
2013 Dr. Thomas Bryant, Music
2014 Dr. Teresa Beckham Gramm, Economics
2015 Dr. Loretta Jackson-Hayes, Chemistry
2016Dr. Scott Newstok, English

Clarence Day Award for Research and Creative Activity

1981 Dr. John F. Copper, International Studies
1983 Professor Jack D. Farris, English
1984 Dr. Richard D. Gilliom, Chemistry
1985 Dr. David H. Kesler, Biology
1986 Professor Tony Lee Garner, Theatre
1987 Dr. James M. Olcese, Biology
1988 Dr. John F. Copper, International Studies
1989 Dr. Alan P. Jaslow, Biology
1990 Dr. Jack H. Taylor, Physics
1991 Dr. Marcus D. Pohlmann, Political Science
1992 Dr. Steven L. McKenzie, Religious Studies
1993 Dr. Robert J. Strandburg, Psychology
1994 Dr. Andrew A. Michta, International Studies
1995 Dr. Brian W. Shaffer, English
1996 Dr. Cynthia A. Marshall, English
1997 Dr. Stephen R. Haynes, Religious Studies
1998 Dr. Robert M. MacQueen, Physics
1999 Dr. Gail P. C. Streete, Religious Studies
2000 Dr. Susan M. Kus, Anthropology/Sociology
2001 Dr. Michael Nelson, Political Science
2002 Dr. Lynn B. Zastoupil, History
2003 Dr. Natalie K. Person, Psychology
2004 Dr. David P. McCarthy, Art
2005 Dr. Daniel G. Arce, Economics
2006 Dr. Ming Dong Gu, Modern Languages and Literatures
2007 Dr. Marshall Boswell, English
2008 Dr. Mary Miller, Biology
2009 Dr. Christopher Mouron, Mathematics and Computer Science
2010 Dr. Terry Hill, Biology; Dr. Darlene Loprete, Chemistry
2011 Dr. Jeffrey Jackson, History
2012 Dr. Shadrack W. Nasong’o, International Studies
2013 Dr. Patrick Gray, Religious Studies
2014 Dr. Katherine White, Psychology
2015 Dr. Christopher Seaton, Mathematics and Computer Science
2016 Dr. Carole Blankenship, Music

 

Diehl Society Award for Service

1988 Dr. Harold Lyons, Chemistry
1989 Dr. John S. Olsen, Biology
1990 Professor David Ramsey, Music
1991 Dr. David Y. Jeter, Chemistry
1992 Dr. Gail C. McClay, Education
1993 Dr. Robert L. Llewellyn, Philosophy
1994 Dr. Douglas W. Hatfield, History
1995 Dr. Rebecca Sue Legge, Business Administration
1996 Dr. Charles C. Orvis, Economics
1997 Dr. Donald W. Tucker, Modern Languages and Literatures
1998 Dr. Kathryn L. Wright, Modern Languages and Literatures
1999 Dr. Marcus D. Pohlmann, Political Science
2000 Dr. F. Michael McLain, Religious Studies
2001 Dr. Michael P. Kirby, Political Science
2002 Dr. Robert J. Strandburg, Psychology
2003 Dr. Marsha D. Walton, Psychology
2004 Dr. Joseph A. Favazza, Religious Studies

The Jameson M. Jones Outstanding Faculty Service Award

2005 Dr. Ellen T. Armour, Religious Studies
2006 Dr. Timothy S. Huebner, History
2007 Dr. John C. Kaltner, Religious Studies
2008 Dr. Gail P. C. Streete, Religious Studies
2009 Dr. David Kesler, Biology
2010 Dr. Steve Ceccoli, International Studies
2011 Professor David Jilg, Theatre
2012 Dr. Milton Moreland, Religious Studies
2013 Dr. Rebecca S. Finlayson, English
2014 Dr. John Planchon, Commerce and Business
2015 Dr. Bernadette McNary-Zak, Religious Studies
2016 Dr. Judith Haas, English

Historical Summary

Rhodes had its origin in the Clarksville Academy, founded in 1837. The Academy conveyed its property in 1848 to the Masonic Grand Lodge of Tennessee and was merged into the new Masonic University of Tennessee, a degree-granting institution of higher education located in Clarksville, Tennessee. This institution became Montgomery Masonic College in 1850, and in 1855 its name was again changed, to Stewart College, in honor of its president, William M. Stewart. Under President Stewart’s leadership the operation of the College passed from the Masonic Lodge to the Presbyterian Synod of Nashville.

Under the Plan of Union of 1873, the Presbyterian Church reorganized Stewart College after the Reconstruction Era to operate it as the single Presbyterian college for the entire area which was at that time considered to be the Southwest.

In 1875 Stewart College became Southwestern Presbyterian University, developing alongside the undergraduate curriculum a School of Theology, under the leadership of Dr. Joseph Wilson, father of Woodrow Wilson. The School of Theology remained in operation until 1917.

Under the leadership of President Charles E. Diehl, the College moved to Memphis in 1925 and adopted as its name Southwestern, denoting a liberal arts college. In 1945, the official college name became Southwestern At Memphis.

On July 1, 1984, the name of the College was changed to Rhodes College in honor of Peyton Nalle Rhodes, president from 1949 to 1965, who joined the faculty in 1926 and served the institution until his death in 1984. John David Alexander served as president from 1965 to 1969; William Lukens Bowden, from 1969 to 1973; and James Harold Daughdrill, Jr., from 1973 to 1999. William Earl Troutt became the nineteenth president of the College on July 1, 1999.

Intellectual Property

Rhodes College is a college of liberal arts whose mission is to maintain a community of inquiry, discourse, and experiment in which it is clear that scholarship and teaching are parts of a single enterprise. In the course of education there is an expansion of knowledge and understanding, whether in the arts, social sciences, natural sciences or humanities. Among the activities in the study and expansion of knowledge and understanding are the creation of works in the literary, dramatic, musical and visual arts; and of research in the social and physical sciences potentially producing innovation and technology. The intellectual endeavors and activities of Rhodes faculty, staff, or students may result in products of a tangible nature for which the College and the faculty, staff, or student may deem it advantageous to enter these products into commerce. These products may be the subject of a patent application or a copyrightable work or other tangible material and are known collectively as “Intellectual Property.”

It is the policy of Rhodes College to encourage, support and recognize the contributions of the faculty, and the student body where significant works are created. Likewise it is a policy of the College to honor the legal rights of authors and inventors, as well as the funding entities supporting varied works. In order to recognize the potentially overlapping rights in the complex support structure for the College’s activities, the college has issued this policy on Intellectual Property for the guidance of all participating in the mission of the College.

This policy is intended to:

  • provide an incentive to creative intellectual effort and the advancement of knowledge.
  • insure that the respective interests of the College, and supporting sponsor (if any) are considered and protected through the development of fair contracts and procedures.
  • assist the Staff and the College to realize tangible benefits from Intellectual Property, and advance and encourage further research within the College with whatever funds accrue to the College from Intellectual Property resulting from College research.

Definitions

  • “College” shall mean Rhodes College.
  • “Staff” shall mean any member of the faculty, administration, staff, student body, postdoctoral fellow, or visiting scientist, whether or not they receive all or any part of their salary or other compensation from the College.
  • “Inventor” shall mean any Staff member who shall conceive or reduce to practice an invention while engaged in College activities.
  • “Author” shall mean any Staff member who prepares any College copyrightable work.
  • “Contributor” shall mean any Staff member who shall have contributed substantially to the existence of any item of Intellectual Property.
  • “College Activities” shall mean activities engaged in by a member of the Staff by: (a) written assignment of the College administration; (b) contractual agreement with the College or any sponsor; (c) material use of facilities (other than its libraries), or other resources of the College.
  • “Intellectual Property” shall mean inventions, College copyrightable works, and tangible results of research.
  • “Invention” shall mean”…any new and useful process, machine, manufacture or composition of matter or any new and useful improvement thereof…” as defined under the Patent Laws of the United States.
  • “College Copyrightable Work” shall mean copyrightable works owned by the College.
  • “Tangible Results of Research” shall mean a physical embodiment of the research effort, including physical embodiments of any invention, or College Copyrightable Work which results from College Activities by any member of the Staff. Such Tangible Results of Research shall include, but not be limited to antibodies, cell lines, new microorganisms, plant lines or progeny thereof; recombinant or other biological materials; integrated circuit chips, computer software, engineering prototypes and drawings, chemical compounds; devices; machines; and models.
  • “Sponsor” shall mean any individual or organization that by written agreement with the College shall finance in whole or part any College Activities.
  • “New Revenue” or “Annual New Royalty” are defined as revenues received from the licensing and developing of an Intellectual Property after deduction of all costs reasonably attributable to the protection and distribution of such Intellectual Property, including any reasonable expense of patent or copyright prosecution, maintenance, interference proceedings, litigation, marketing or other dissemination and licensing. Net revenues from the following sources are subject to distribution: option fees; up-front licensing fees; licensing payments; milestone payments; or proceeds from the sale of stock or other equity in the licensee company.

Coverage

These policies shall apply as a condition of appointment or employment by the College to every member of the Staff who during the period of their appointment or employment by the College shall: (a) conceive or first reduce to practice actually or constructively, any Invention; (b) prepare any College Copyrightable Work; or (c) contribute substantially to the existence of any Tangible Result of Research.

Disclosure of Intellectual Property

Every Staff member shall, in writing and in reasonable detail, give the Dean of the Faculty prompt notice of any: (a) Invention; (b) College Copyrightable Work; or (c) Tangible Result of Research which he or she shall desire to have patented, copyrighted or made available to the investigators or the public by commercial or other means, or shall believe or have reason to believe is patentable, copyrightable, or of value to other investigators or the public, or otherwise of commercial value.

Ownership

Inventions. The rights of ownership to all Inventions which result from College Activities shall be the property of the College; provided, however, that:

  • Within the ninety (90) days next following disclosure of an Invention to the College under the preceding Section on Disclosure of Intellectual Property (or such further period of time as may be agreed upon by the Inventor and the Dean of the Faculty), the Dean of the Faculty shall determine, and advise the Inventor in writing, whether such rights shall be retained by the College, conditionally retained by the College or shall be released to the inventor; and
  • The rights of ownership to every Invention conceived by any Staff member while engaged in other than College Activities shall be the property of that person.

Copyrightable Works. The rights of ownership to all copyrightable works prepared while the Staff member is engaged in College Activities shall be the property of the College; provided however that:

  • Within the ninety (90) days following disclosure of College copyrightable Work to the College under the preceding Section on Disclosure of Intellectual Property (or such further period of time as may be agreed upon by the Author and the Dean of the Faculty, the Dean of the Faculty shall determine, and advise the Author, in writing, whether such rights shall be retained by the College, conditionally retained by the College or shall be released to the Author; and
  • Copyrightable works prepared by a Staff member while engaged in activities other than College activities shall be the property of the Author.

Tangible Results of Research. All Tangible Results of Research shall be the property of the College.

Sponsorship of Intellectual Property

The rights of ownership to each item of Intellectual Property produced during activities conducted pursuant to any agreement between the College and any Sponsor shall be determined in accordance with such agreement; however, it shall be the policy of the College to retain title to Intellectual Property whenever possible under state or federal law. Any agreement with a Sponsor pertaining to the ownership of Intellectual Property and assignment thereof shall be made between the College and the Sponsor in advance of the research or other activity that produces the Intellectual Property.

Disagreements

The President shall appoint a Committee on Intellectual Property composed of both faculty members and administrative officers (the Dean of the Faculty shall serve ex officio). The creator of any Intellectual Property that is or might be covered under this Policy (see above for Patents) cannot be a voting member of this Committee. This Committee shall be the body to whom appeals may be made. Whenever legal protection for Intellectual Property is anticipated all persons engaged in such creative activity are encouraged to keep regular notebooks and records, preferably in the form of bound notebooks that are regularly signed and dated by the Inventor(s) as well as periodically signed by one or more witnesses.

Seeking a Patent or Copyright

Whenever the Provost shall determine to seek the patenting or copyrighting of any Invention or College Copyrightable Work, the College shall, without expense to the Inventor or Author provide such professional services as it shall deem to be necessary or desirable for such purpose, and which may include the services of an independent patent organization. The Inventor or Author is obligated to cooperate fully in such effort, including his or her execution of all necessary or desirable agreements, applications, and other forms and instruments. If, at any time subsequently, the College shall terminate its effort to seek such patent or copyright, it shall promptly give written notice thereof to the Inventor or Author who thereupon to the extent allowed by law or any sponsorship agreement shall be free at his or her expense to develop, license, and otherwise use the Invention, patent application, patent or copyright. In this event the Inventor or Author shall receive all benefits of any development, licensing or other use of the Invention, patent application, patent or copyright except that the College shall be entitled to recovery of associated costs.

Transfer or Sale of Tangible Results of Research

Tangible Results of Research may not be transferred or sold to any party outside the College before: (a) a disclosure of the Tangible Results of Research has been submitted to the Provost and (b) the Contributor(s) has been notified by the Office of the Dean of the Faculty of any required conditions of such transfer or sale. Such notification shall be made within thirty (30) days following the disclosure of Tangible Results of Research.

Promotion and Licensing

In interpreting and applying these policies, the College shall, by such means as it shall deem to be most effective and appropriate in each case, act to bring to the public all Intellectual Property to which the College has rights of ownership in whole or part. Such means may include, but shall not be limited to, agreements for the development, patenting, copyrighting, promotion, licensing, printing, distributing or manufacturing of any Intellectual Property; and in every case the College shall advise the Inventor, Author, or contributor of the terms of any such proposed agreement. No agreements will be entered into by the College without the review of all Inventors, Authors or contributors. Any disagreement between the College and the Inventor(s), Author(s) or contributor(s) concerning a proposed agreement will be resolved in a timely fashion by the Committee on Intellectual Property.

Proceeds from Distribution of Intellectual Property

Invention Proceeds. Subsequent to the College’s recovery of funds that were invested in patenting, marketing or developing Intellectual Property, the Contributor(s) and the College will share in the net revenue received from the Contributor’s Intellectual Property(ies) owned by and licensed from the College. The Contributor(s) will receive 50% of the net revenues, and the College will receive 50%. It is understood that one-half of the College’s portion will be for the primary purpose of advancing and encouraging further research and intellectual property development within Rhodes College.
In the case of multiple Inventors, the Inventors’ share will be distributed among the Inventors in accordance with a written agreement signed by all Inventors; or, if there is no such agreement, all Inventors will receive an equal share.

If inventorship is shared among College Inventors and inventors at one or more other institutions, the College will negotiate with the one or more other institutions concerning exclusive licenses and distribution of revenues. College net revenues from such agreements will be distributed to inventors at the College using the distribution formulae discussed above.

Copyright Proceeds. These will follow the same distribution and stipulations as Inventions listed above.

Tangible Results of Research Proceeds. To the extent allowed by law, where any Tangible Result of Research is not within the scope of the claims of a patent, patent application, or copyright, each Contributor shall share in any net revenue or annual net revenue to the same extent a Contributor shares in proceeds listed above for Inventions and Copyrights.

Sponsors: Other Organizations

If and when any conflict shall arise between these Policies and any condition or conditions of (a) any proposed grant from or contract with any organization offering to act as a Sponsor or (b) the patent, copyright or intellectual property policies and procedures of any other organization to which any joint appointment or any affiliation or consulting agreement is made, such conflict shall be referred to the Committee on Intellectual Property. Following consideration of the conflict the Committee shall recommend a course of action to the College administration. It is incumbent on the College to take all reasonable steps, including but not limited to appropriate legal action, to protect and advocate issues on its behalf and those of the Inventor, Author or Contributor in the event of a conflict with a Sponsor.

Release of Rights Ownership

The Office of the Dean of the Faculty may, for reasons and upon terms deemed to be satisfactory by its office, release on behalf of the College at any time any Invention, patent, patent application, College Copyrightable Work, copyright or right of ownership to Tangible Results of Research to its Inventor, Author or Contributor.

Copyright

Within higher education, it has been the prevailing academic practice to treat the faculty member as the copyright owner of works that are created independently and at the faculty member’s own initiative for traditional academic purposes. Examples include, but are not limited to, class notes and syllabi, books and articles, works of fiction and nonfiction, poems and dramatic works, musical and choreographic works, pictorial, graphic, and sculptural works, computer programs, computer-generated works, and educational software (commonly known as “courseware”). This practice has been followed for the most part, regardless of the physical medium in which these “traditional academic works” appear, that is, whether on paper or in audiovisual or electronic form. This practice should also ordinarily apply to the development of courseware for use in programs of distance education. Situations do arise, however, in which the College may fairly claim ownership of, or an interest in, copyright in works created by faculty members. Three general kinds of projects fall into this category: special works created in circumstances that may properly be regarded as “made for hire,” negotiated contractual transfers, and joint works” as described in the Copyright Act.

Works Made for Hire. Although traditional academic work that is copyrightable—such as lecture notes and courseware, books, and articles—cannot normally be treated as works made for hire, some works created by College faculty members do properly fall within that category, allowing the institution to claim copyright ownership. Works created as a specific requirement of employment or as an assigned institutional duty that may, for example, be included in a written job description or an employment agreement, may be fairly deemed works made for hire. Even absent such prior written specification, ownership will vest with the college or university in those cases in which it provides the specific authorization or supervision for the preparation of the work. Examples are reports prepared by a dean or by the chair or members of a faculty committee, or college promotional brochures prepared by a director of admissions. The Copyright Act also defines as a “work made for hire” certain works that are commissioned from one who is not an employee but an “independent contractor.” The institution will own the copyright in such a commissioned work when the author is not a College employee, or when the author is such a faculty member but the work to be created falls outside the normal scope of that person’s employment duties (such as a professor of art history commissioned by the institution under special contract to write a catalog for a campus art gallery). In such situations, for the work-made-for-hire doctrine to apply there must be a written agreement so stating and signed by both parties; the work must also fall within a limited number of statutory categories, which include instructional texts, examinations, and contributions to a collective work.

Contractual Transfers. In situations in which the copyright ownership is held by the faculty member, it is possible for the individual to transfer the entire copyright, or a more limited license, to the College or to a third party. As already noted, under the Copyright Act, a transfer of all of the copyright or of an exclusive right must be reflected in a signed document in order to be valid. When, for example, a work is prepared pursuant to a program of “sponsored research” accompanied by a monetary grant from a third party, a contract signed by the faculty member providing that copyright will be owned by the College will be enforceable. Similarly, the College may reasonably request that the faculty member—when entering into an agreement granting the copyright or publishing rights to a third party—make efforts to reserve to the institution the right to use the work in its internally administered programs of teaching, research, and public service on a perpetual, royalty-free, nonexclusive basis.

Joint Works. Under certain circumstances, two or more persons may share copyright ownership of a work, notably when it is a “joint work.” The most familiar example of a joint work is a book or article written, fully collaboratively, by two academic colleagues. Each is said to be a “co-owner” of the copyright, with each having all the usual rights of the copyright owner provided that any income from such uses is shared with the other. In rare situations it may be proper to treat a work as a product of the joint authorship of the faculty member and the College, so that both have a shared interest in the copyright. Whoever owns the copyright, the College may reasonably require reimbursement for any unusual financial or technical support. (“Unusual financial or technical support” is defined as follows: Extensive un-reimbursed use of major College laboratory, studio, or computational facilities, or human resources. The use of these facilities must be important to the creation of the intellectual property; merely incidental use of a facility does not constitute substantial use, or does extensive use of a facility commonly available to all faculty or professional staff (such as libraries and offices), nor does extensive use of a specialized facility for routine tasks. Use will be considered “unusual” and facilities will be considered “major” if similar use facilities would cost the creator more than $5,000 (five thousand dollars) in constant 1984 dollars if purchased or leased in the public marketplace. Creators wishing to reimburse the College for the use of its facilities must make arrangements to do so before the level of facilities usage for a particular intellectual property becomes substantial as defined.) That reimbursement might take the form of future royalties or a nonexclusive, royalty-free license to use the work for internal educational and administrative purposes. This means that the course developer and the College must reach an understanding about the conditions of portability and commercialization of faculty work developed using substantial College resources. Ordinarily, such an understanding will be recorded in a written agreement between the course developer and the College on a course-by-course basis.

Rhodes Presbyterian History and Liberal Arts Heritage

Rhodes’ relation to the Presbyterian Church has remained close and unbroken since 1855. The most recent expression of the College’s relationship to the Church may be found in a covenant statement between Rhodes and the Church, summarized as follows:

Rhodes is a liberal arts college associated with the Presbyterian Church (U.S.A.). The College has a covenant relationship with the Synod of Living Waters (Tennessee, Mississippi, Alabama, Kentucky).

Rhodes, as a church-related college whose primary mission is to educate, guarantees freedom of inquiry for faculty and students. The College, without pressing for acceptance, maintains a climate in which the Christian faith is nurtured. The curriculum includes a variety of courses in Bible and religion that explore the Judeo-Christian heritage and its implications for the whole of life. Students are required to study the Bible and its relationship with history and culture as a part of their college work. As an academic community founded on Christian ideals, Rhodes expresses personal concern for students, provides opportunities for corporate worship, and maintains a commitment to social justice and human mercy.

More specifically, the educational purpose of the College is expressed in its maintenance of an environment for the pursuit of truth in which it is ensured that the Christian faith is clearly articulated, that its formative role in Western civilization is carefully considered, and that honest intellectual and moral questions are articulated and responded to intelligently and sensitively.

This commitment is made clear in a resolution adopted by the Board of Trustees of the College: It is the intention of the Board that the College substantially complies with requiring twelve credits of sound and comprehensive study of the Bible for the granting of a degree. In keeping with this resolution and with the mission of the College, the foundations requirement is structured so that there are two ways available to students to complete this part of the degree program. Students may choose the course The Search for Values in the Light of Western History and Religion or the Life: Then and Now Program.

The Campus

The following alphabetical listing of Rhodes buildings includes functions of these facilities and the names of those who made the buildings possible. Thirteen campus buildings and two permanent gateways are listed on The National Register of Historic Places.

The Alburty Swimming Complex, given through the generosity of the late E. A. (Bob) and Emily Beale Alburty, was dedicated May, 1977.

The Ashner Gateway* is a memorial to I. W. and Sallie Ashner, established by Mrs. Julius Goodman and Mrs. Ike Gronauer of Memphis.

Bailey Lane, the north campus drive between Snowden Street and Charles Place, was named in 1998 for Memphian Edgar H. Bailey, Rhodes life trustee, and his wife Ann Pridgen Bailey, Class of 1947, in grateful appreciation of their vision, generosity and devoted service to Rhodes.

The Paul Barret, Jr. Library is a state-of-the-art facility, made possible by a major gift from the Paul Barret, Jr. Trust. The Library opened during the summer of 2005. Paul Barret, Jr., a graduate of the class of 1946 who died in 1999, was the nephew of Mr. and Mrs. A.K. Burrow, who provided for the construction of the 1953 Burrow Library.

Bellingrath Residence Hall* was dedicated October 18, 1961, in memory of Dr. Walter D. Bellingrath, Mobile, Alabama, a long-time friend and benefactor of the College.

Blount Hall, a residence hall completed in 1986, was dedicated on October 17, 1996 in recognition of Carolyn and Wynton Malcolm Blount as distinguished leaders, benefactors and friends of Rhodes.

Boyle Court, provided by the employees of Boyle Investment Company in memory of Chairman Emeritus J. Bayard Boyle, Sr., was dedicated January 23, 1997. In 1998, as part of the 150th Anniversary celebration of Rhodes, a time capsule was buried in Boyle Court, to be opened in 2048.

Thomas W. Briggs Hall, previously the Thomas W. Briggs Student Center, was provided through the generosity of the late Mr. and Mrs. Thomas W. Briggs of Memphis, augmented by gifts of parents and other friends, and dedicated May 2, 1966. It houses the Computer Science department and campus-wide meeting spaces.

The Bryan Campus Life Center, dedicated January 23, 1997, was given in honor of Catherine Wilkerson Bryan by her four children, John Henry Bryan, Jr. '58, Caroline Bryan Harrell, family of Catherine Bryan Dill, George Wilkerson Bryan and by Bryan Foods of West Point, Mississippi, co-founded by her husband, the late John Henry Bryan, Sr. The Center encompasses a performance gymnasium, a three-court multiuse gymnasium, racquetball and squash courts, a state of the art fitness room, an indoor jogging track and accommodations for student social events, lectures and other campus occasions. Other activity areas include:

  • The L. Palmer Brown Lynx Lair, a student recreation area housing the snack bar, billiards and other game rooms, TV viewing and lounge areas.
  • The Brenda and Lester Crain Reception Hall provides elegant accommodations for campus social events and other special occasions.
  • The Dunavant Tennis Complex, the gift of Dr. Tommie S. and William B. Dunavant, Jr., includes ten lighted courts and stadium seating built to NCAA National tournament standards.
  • The William Neely Mallory Memorial Gymnasium is the site of Rhodes’ intercollegiate athletic events. It was dedicated December 10, 1954, in memory of Major William Neely Mallory, Memphis, who was killed in an airplane crash in Italy on February 19, 1945. Major Mallory became a member of the Board of Directors of Rhodes in 1937, and in 1938 became Treasurer of the College, which office he held at the time of his death.
  • The McCallum Ballroom is named in honor of Virginia J. and Robert D. McCallum, Chair of Rhodes Board of Trustees from 1969 to 1981.
  • The Ruth Sherman Hyde Gymnasium, made possible by gifts of the J. R. Hyde family, was dedicated March 17, 1971. It now houses three racquetball courts and an aerobics/dance studio.
  • Crain Field, home of the Rhodes football and lacrosse teams, was recently renovated with state-of-the-art FieldTurf provided by a gift from Brenda and J. Lester Crain, Jr. '51. The field was dedicated in 2012 in honor of his father, J. Lester Crain, Sr. '29.
  • Fargason Field, the original athletic playing fields on campus, was the gift to the College of about 15 acres of land owned by Mr. John T. Fargason and his sister Mrs. Mary Fargason Falls. Their generosity and name are now reflected in the collection of fields for varsity sports located to the north of the William Neely Mallory Gymnasium.
  • Jerden Field for intramurals and club sports is named In honor of Jane and J.L. Jerden '59.
  • Mason Field for Field Hockey was dedicated in 2013 thanks to the generosity of the Mason family.
  • Solomon Field which serves as a practice field, was dedicated in 1994 in memory of the winning college football player and all-round outstanding athlete Craig R. Solomon '79.
  • Stauffer Field at Irwin Lainoff Stadium, home of the Rhodes varsity baseball team, was named in 1977 in honor of Frederic R. Stauffer, professor of physics for 26 years and college baseball coach for 10 years. Renovations completed by the 2009 season gave the College one of the finest baseball facilities in NCAA Division III, including the Irwin Lainoff Stadium, thanks to Riea and Steven Lainoff and other donors.
  • The Winston Wolfe Track and Field Complex was dedicated in 2010 in honor of Winston Wolfe, an entrepreneur, athlete, philanthropist, and loyal friend of Rhodes College.

Buckman Hall was named in honor of Mertie W. Buckman and the late Stanley J. Buckman and their family. It houses the departments of International Studies, Economics and Business Administration, Political Science, Language Laboratory, and the Wynton M. Blount Lecture Hall. The building features Daughdrill Tower, which honors President and Mrs. James H. Daughdrill, Jr. and was provided anonymously by an alumna-trustee of the College. The building was dedicated October 24, 1991.

Adrienne McMillan Burns Memorial Labyrinth, given in 2005 in memory of the Class of 1988 alumna.

Burrow Hall,* formerly the College library, was given through the generosity of the late Mr. and Mrs. A. K. Burrow, Memphis, and dedicated October 8, 1953. It was renovated in 1988 and again in 2008 when it reopened as the Burrow Center for Student Opportunity. Burrow Hall contains the Alburty Room, named in honor of Rhodes Trustee the late E. A. Alburty, and the Pearce Conference Room for Career Services, International Education and Fellowships, provided by Elizabeth Roe Pearce '91.

The Catherine Burrow Refectory named in honor of the late Mrs. A. K. Burrow, Memphis, is the College’s main dining facility. It encompasses:

  • The Davis Room, named in honor of the late Thomas B. Davis of Memphis.
  • The Hugh M. Neely Hall,* the original dining hall on campus, dedicated on November 13, 1928. It was provided through the generosity and affection of the late Mrs. Mary Sneed Neely as a memorial to her husband Hugh M. Neely, a heroic soldier and public-spirited citizen.
  • The Margaret Ruffin Hyde Hall,* built in 1958 and dedicated in 1993 in honor of the late Dr. Margaret R. Hyde, Class of 1934, benefactor and Trustee of the College.
  • Rollow Hall, built in 1987, and dedicated on Oct 26, 2002, by Ann Rollow Ross '52 in memory of her parents, John ’26 and Louise Mayo Rollow '30, and her sister Lisa Rollow Justis '55.
             Renovations to Burrow Refectory, completed in 2012 provided 19,000 square feet of additional space. The expanded facility includes a spacious exhibition-style servery, three new private dining rooms, including The President's Dining Room, given by Dr. Randall R. Rhea '77, in honor of President and Mrs. William Troutt and:
  • The Lillian Goldman Hall provided by the Lillian Goldman Charitable Trust, Amy Goldman Fowler and Cary Fowler '71. 
  • The Wilson Fireside Lounge, provided through the generosity of Becky and Spence Wilson.

The S. DeWitt Clough Hall, erected in memory of S. DeWitt Clough of Chicago, houses the Departments of Anthropology/Sociology and Psychology. The Clough-Hanson Gallery and the Department of Art are located in the Hugo H. Dixon Wing. Clough Hall was dedicated October 14, 1970. A major renovation was completed in August 2013 to provide additional classrooms and office space.

Claire Markham Collins Meditation Garden, given 2005 by the family of Garnet J. Caldwell '05 in memory of the Class of 1981 alumna.

Craddock Quad, a gift of he Craddock family, was named in 2014. The quad is bounded by West Village, Glassell Hall, Catherine Burrow Refectory and Moore Moore Infirmary.

Dan Davis Court was named in 2004 in memory of Rhodes benefactor and friend Dan W. Davis, 1923-2002. The court is bounded by Robb Hall, Catherine Burrow Refectory and Berthold S. Kennedy Hall.

James H. Daughdrill, Jr. Meditation Garden, dedicated April 28, 1999. Located to the south of Fisher Garden, the Daughdrill Meditation Garden is a gift of the students of Rhodes.

Diehl Court, dedicated on October 8, 1983, was provided by the Class of 1933 in gratitude to Charles E. Diehl, President 1917-1949, and to his devoted administrative assistant Erma Reese Solomon. The sculpture of President Diehl is by the artist Edwin Rust.

East Village, consisting of Buildings A and B, was opened in August 2001, and provides apartment-styled living areas for juniors and seniors. East Village includes a Lodge that provides space for recreation and meetings.

Ellett Residence Hall* was dedicated December 18, 1956, in memory of Dr. E. C. Ellett, Memphis, an alumnus of Rhodes.

The Frazier Jelke Science Center, housing the Department of Biology, was dedicated October 19, 1968, in memory of Mr. Frazier Jelke of New York. The plaza atop the Frazier Jelke Science Center was re-landscaped in 2015.

The Hubert F. Fisher Memorial Garden was provided in 1941 by Mrs. Hubert F. Fisher as a memorial to her husband, Congressman Fisher. The garden with its permanent stone stage is the scene of commencement exercises and other college functions.

Alfred C. Glassell Residence Hall was dedicated May 2, 1968, in memory of Alfred C. Glassell of Shreveport, Louisiana, an alumnus of Rhodes and a member of its Board of Trustees 1929-1938 and 1943-1958.

Gooch Hall,* was erected in 1962 and dedicated on October 22, 1981, in memory of Boyce Alexander and Cecil Milton Gooch. The building adjoins Palmer Hall and the Richard Halliburton Memorial Tower and houses the Office of Finance and Business Affairs, the Offices of the Academic Deans, and Greek and Roman Studies.

The Richard Halliburton Memorial Tower,* provided by the late Mr. and Mrs. Wesley Halliburton, Memphis, parents of the distinguished world traveler and author, was dedicated October 17, 1962.The first floor reception area formerly contained cases for exhibits selected from the Jessie L. Clough Art Memorial for Teaching. A portion of the funds required for its construction was provided by the late S. DeWitt Clough and his wife, Rachel Clough, of Chicago. On October 11, 2011, the renovated reception area was dedicated as The Nancy Hill Fulmer President's Office, named in honor of the 1951 alumna and former Trustee.

The Frank M. Harris Memorial Building,* provided by the generosity of the late Mrs. Nannie P. Harris, Memphis, as a perpetual memorial to her beloved son, Frank M. Harris, was dedicated June 6, 1938. The building currently houses The Mike Curb Institute for Music, founded in 2006 through a generous gift from the Mike Curb Family Foundation.

Hassell Hall, housing the Music Department, was a gift of the Hassell Family of Clifton, Tennessee, and other friends and alumni of Rhodes. It contains the Tuthill Performance Hall, dedicated in 2003 and named in memory of Burnet C. Tuthill, the College’s first Director of Music. The building was dedicated on April 27, 1984.

The Hunt Gateway* is a memorial to Captain William Ireys Hunt, M.D., Class of 1934. The gift of the First Presbyterian Church, Greenville, Mississippi, this memorial was dedicated on May 31, 1948.

Berthold S. Kennedy Hall,* erected in 1925, was remodeled in 1968 to house the Department of Chemistry. It was dedicated on October 19, 1968 in honor of Rhodes alumnus Dr. Berthold S. Kennedy, of Anna Maria, Florida.

Dorothy C. King Hall, formerly the national headquarters for Pi Kappa Alpha Fraternity, is named in honor of Rhodes’ long-time friend and benefactor and houses the Meeman Center for Lifelong Learning and the Offices of Development and Alumni. In 2014, the Southwest Room was renamed the Edmund Orgill Room, in honor of the former Memphis Mayor and College Trustee.

The Edward B. LeMaster Memorial Gateway, a symbol of the close ties between the College and the city of Memphis, was dedicated in 1983 to the memory of the prominent Memphian who was instrumental in the College’s move to Memphis.

The McCoy Theatre, given by the McCoy Foundation, established by the late Harry B. McCoy, Jr., Memphis, in memory of his parents, Minetry and Harry McCoy, was dedicated on January 21, 1982. Renovations which began in 2005 doubled the McCoy Theatre in size, adding the McCoy Studio which is a second black-box theatre, and provided set construction, wardrobe design and storage space, as well as classrooms and theatre faculty offices. The new construction officially opened on September 7, 2006. Originally converted from a Zeta Tau Alpha sorority house, the intimate McCoy Theatre was named in honor of the late Harry McCoy, a Memphis real estate developer who died in 1966. The Harry B. McCoy Foundation funded the original renovations as well as the new addition.

The Moore Moore Infirmary,* made possible through a bequest of the late Dr. Moore Moore, Sr., beloved College Physician and Secretary of the Board of Directors from 1925 until his death June 28, 1957, was dedicated June 2, 1962, as a memorial to his wife, Ethel Shirley Moore.

Ohlendorf Hall, erected in 1968, was dedicated July 2, 1996, in honor of Rhodes Trustee Harold F. Ohlendorf, Class of 1931, and his wife Bruce in grateful appreciation of their service to the College. The building houses the Department of Mathematics and Computer Science and the Buckman Mathematics Library, dedicated October 19, 1968, the gift of the late Dr. Stanley Buckman and his associates at Buckman Laboratories, Inc.

Palmer Hall,* erected largely by contributions from the people of New Orleans in memory of Dr. Benjamin Morgan Palmer, for many years pastor of the First Presbyterian Church, New Orleans, was dedicated November 27, 1925. Palmer Hall is home to classrooms, administrative offices and the Hardie Auditorium. In 2010, after extensive renovation, Palmer became the home of all faculty who teach courses in languages and literatures.

Phillips Lane, the front entrance to the campus, was named in 1994 in honor of Weetie and Harry Phillips of Memphis and in grateful appreciation of their vision, generosity and devoted service to Rhodes.

The Peyton Nalle Rhodes Tower, erected in 1968, is named in honor of Rhodes Professor of Physics (1926-1949), President (1949-1965) and President Emeritus (1965). The building houses the Department of Physics and was dedicated on April 23, 1981. A complete renovation was begun in 2014 and the building was reopened in May, 2015. The renovations include The Brenda and J. Lester Crain,Jr. '51 Astronomy and Astrophysics Laboratory. In addition, The Gladney Lounge and The Taylor-Hopper Seminar Room, were given through the generosity of Dr. John Gladney '74.

The Physical Plant Building, erected in 1999, houses Physical Plant offices and the Purchasing Department. The Frances Falls Austin Conference Room and Office Complex, given in memory of his mother by Memphis business and civic leader Falls Austin, was dedicated in December, 2003.

Robb Residence Hall* was named in memory of Lt. Col. Albert Robb, attorney, who was a member of the Board of Directors of Stewart College at the time the Presbyterian Church assumed control of Montgomery Masonic College in 1855. In 1859, he donated the land on which the first residence for male students was erected in Clarksville, Tennessee, where Rhodes was located until 1925.

Robertson Hall, completed in 2017, was dedicated in honor of Lola ’33 and Charles Robertson, Sr. ’29 in appreciation of the generosity of Patricia and Charles Robertson, Jr. ’65. It houses the Biology and Chemistry departments.

Robinson Hall, completed in 1985, also serves as one of the College’s primary summer conference residence facilities and contains space for 84 residents. It was dedicated on December 17, 1989, in memory of James D. Robinson, Memphis business leader, founder of Auto-Chlor, Inc.

The Rollow Avenue of Oaks, dedicated in 1976, were planted south of Palmer Hall as seedlings brought from the Clarksville campus by alumnus and college engineer John A. Rollow, class of 1926.

Spann Place, completed in 1987, was named in honor of the late Jeanette S. Spann, Class of 1930 and Honorary Trustee of the College. This complex comprises five townhouses for innovative student housing.

Stewart Residence Hall, formerly a faculty residence, is a student residence hall which was most recently renovated in 2001. The building is named for William N. Stewart, a former president and important leader in the early history of Rhodes College.

Thomas Lane, between Ashner Gateway and Kennedy Hall, was named in 1997 to honor Nancy and James A. Thomas III, class of 1962, in recognition of their generosity and service to Rhodes.

Margaret Townsend Residence Hall was dedicated June 3,1961, in honor of Margaret Huxtable Townsend, a member of the Rhodes faculty from 1918 to 1954, and who was Rhodes’ first Dean of Women, serving in that capacity from 1925 to 1952. A Conservatory for meetings and recreation was added in 2002 and is located in a courtyard formed by Townsend, Trezevant and Voorhies Halls.

Suzanne Trezevant Residence Hall, given by Edward H. Little in memory of his wife, Suzanne Trezevant Little, was dedicated on November 18, 1966.

The Bill and Carole Troutt Quad, honoring the College’s 19th President and First Lady, was dedicated in 2017. The quad is bounded by the Paul Barret, Jr. Library, Robertson Hall, Briggs Hall, and Hassell Hall.

Voorhies Residence Hall, provided through the generosity of the late Mrs. Emma Denie Voorhies, Memphis, was dedicated April 10, 1948.

Lee B. Wailes Court, bounded by Halliburton Tower, Robb Hall, White Hall and Ashner Gateway, is named in grateful recognition of the generosity of Lee B. Wailes, class of 1929, and was dedicated September 23, 1988.

West Village Rhodes newest residence hall, was opened in August, 2012. West Village houses 141 upper-class students in twenty-two deluxe suites.

Gordon White Residence Hall,* a memorial to Dr. Gordon White, established by his sister, the late Mrs. Lizzie Gordon White Hood, Nashville, Tennessee, was dedicated November 13, 1947.

The Williams Prayer Room, an intimate chapel in Voorhies Hall, was given in memory of John Whorton and Anna Fletcher Williams by their children Sallie P. and Susan Fletcher Williams. It was dedicated on April 10, 1948.

Anne Marie Caskey Williford Residence Hall, erected in 1969, was dedicated April 23, 1980, in memory of Anne Marie Williford, class of 1952, who was Dean of Women (1968-1975) and Dean of Students from July 1, 1975, until her death July 19, 1979.

* Listed on The National Register of Historic Places, the official Federal list of districts, sites, buildings, structures, and objects significant in American history, architecture, archeology, engineering, and culture.