Mathematics and Computer Science

The Department of Mathematics and Computer Science offers students numerous opportunities to develop quantitative reasoning, critical-thinking, problem-solving, and communication skills through its curriculum and extracurricular activities.

 

Honors in Mathematics or Computer Science

Requirements:

  1. Fulfillment of the requirements for the major.
  2. Honors Tutorial: 495 and 496.
  3. Approval by the department is required.

Students should consult with a faculty member about their intentions to pursue an honors project before the end of their Junior year.

 

Mathematics and Computer Science: Faculty and Staff

Associate Professors

Erin N. Bodine. 2010. B.S. and B.A., Harvey Mudd College; Ph.D., University of Tennessee, Knoxville. (Optimal control theory, mathematical ecology, differential equations, discrete difference equations, individual and agent based modeling.)
Eric Gottlieb. 1998. B.S., Antioch College; M.S., University of Washington; Ph.D., University of Miami. (Algebraic combinatorics.) 
Christopher Mouron. 2002. B.S., Lafayette College; M.S. and Ph.D., Texas Tech University. (Topology, continuum theory, discrete dynamical systems.)
Betsy Williams Sanders. 2007. B.S., Millsaps College; M.S. and Ph.D., Vanderbilt University. (Computer graphics and animation.)
Chris Seaton. 2004. Chair. E.C. Ellett Professorship of Mathematics and Computer Science. B.A., Kalamazoo College; Ph.D., University of Colorado at Boulder. (Differential geometry, differential topology, orbifolds, Lie groupoids, singular symplectic reduction, invariant theory.)

Assistant Professors

Ibrahim Abdelrazeq. 2015. B.S., Yarmouk University; M.S., New Mexico State University; Ph.D., University of Ottawa (Time series analysis, financial and actuarial mathematics, parametric and nonparametric goodness of fit tests.)
Sesha Dassanayake. 2017. B.A., Wabash College; M.S., University of Minnesota; M.S., University of Colorado Denver; Ph.D., University of Colorado Denver (Spatio-temporal methods for disease surveillance.)
Rachel M. Dunwell. 2005. B.Sc., Leeds University; M.Sc., Liverpool University, Ph.D., Heriot-Watt University. (Psychometrics.)
Phillip B. Kirlin. 2012. B.S., University of Maryland; M.S. and Ph.D., University of Massachusetts Amherst. (Artificial intelligence, machine learning, music informatics.)
D. Brian Larkins. 2015. B.S., M.S., Ph.D., The Ohio State University.(Parallel programming, programming languages, network security.)
Catherine E. Welsh. 2013. B.S., Ursinus College; M.S., Lehigh University; Ph.D., University of North Carolina-Chapel Hill. (Bioinformatics, computational genetics.)

Staff

K. Michelle Hammontree. Departmental Assistant. B.A., University of Southern Indiana, Evansville.

Planning a Major

Students considering a major in Mathematics or Computer Science should contact the Chair or another member of the department as early as possible to ensure progress is being made toward the major. More information can be found at the department’s web site: www.rhodes.edu/mathcs.
For reasonable progress toward a major in Mathematics, a student should begin the Calculus sequence (Math 121, 122 and 223) at the appropriate level in the first year, and complete the sequence before the Spring of the second year; complete Math 201 in the first year or second year; and complete Math 261 by the end of the second year.
For reasonable progress toward a major in Computer Science, a student should begin the introductory programming sequence (Computer Science 141, 142, 241) in the first year. In the second year, a student should complete Computer Science 172 in fall and Computer Science 231 in the spring. The Mathematics requirements should be completed by the end of the third year.

Requirements for a Major in Computer Science

A total of fifty-three (53) credits as follows:

  1. Computer Science 141, 142, 172, 231, 241, 330, 485, and 486.
  2. Computer Science 350 or 355.
  3. Mathematics 121 and one additional mathematics course.
  4. Three additional four-credit computer science courses numbered above 300, excluding 495 and 496.

Requirements for a Major in Mathematics

A total of forty-nine (49) credits as follows:

  1. Mathematics 121, 122, 201, 223, 261, 386, and four credits of 485 and/or 486.
  2. Six additional four-credit courses from among mathematics courses numbered above 200 or Computer Science 141, including at least four courses numbered above 300, excluding 460, 495, and 496.

Requirements for a Minor in Computer Science

A total of twenty-four (24) credits as follows:

  1. Computer Science 141, 142, 172, 231, and 241.
  2. One additional four-credit computer science course numbered above 300.

Requirements for a Minor in Mathematics

A total of twenty-four (24) credits as follows:

  1. Mathematics 121 and 122.
  2. Four additional four-credit mathematics course numbered above 200, including at least one course numbered above 300.